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(CBS News)   Americans waste 150,000 tons of food a day. Although you sure couldn't tell by looking   ( cbsnews.com) divider line
    More: Stupid, Nutrition, higher quality diets, food waste, Eating, co-author Meredith Niles, average daily calories, Vermont assistant professor, low quality diets  
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422 clicks; posted to Business » on 20 Apr 2018 at 11:45 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-04-20 09:58:53 PM  
"Every day in the United States, consumers throw out nearly a pound of food each, according to new research."

I would have guessed it's more than that.
 
2018-04-20 10:08:27 PM  

slackananda: "Every day in the United States, consumers throw out nearly a pound of food each, according to new research."

I would have guessed it's more than that.


Some of us were raised to be members of the clean plate club, tyvm.
 
2018-04-20 10:40:02 PM  
I was raised poor, and one thing stuck with me. Waste not, want not. I am a *thrifty* person.

Also have done time helping in food banks.

IMHO, no one deserves to go hungry. The issue is logistical.

As Kinnison said..............
 
2018-04-20 10:46:49 PM  

ThomasPaineTrain: slackananda: "Every day in the United States, consumers throw out nearly a pound of food each, according to new research."

I would have guessed it's more than that.

Some of us were raised to be members of the clean plate club, tyvm.


I used to do restaurant work. The amount of waste was appalling.
 
2018-04-20 10:51:16 PM  
You sure that's not waist 150 tons, Subby?
 
2018-04-20 10:54:10 PM  
I've always been a bit confused about the concept of food waste. If we don't crack open the bones and suck out the marrow, is that food waste? If not, why not?

"Just because a banana has a bruise on it, doesn't mean we have to throw it away," Niles said, "and we can repurpose it," Niles said.

Here's an idea, Niles: shove it up your ass.
 
2018-04-20 10:56:47 PM  

slackananda: ThomasPaineTrain: slackananda: "Every day in the United States, consumers throw out nearly a pound of food each, according to new research."

I would have guessed it's more than that.

Some of us were raised to be members of the clean plate club, tyvm.

I used to do restaurant work. The amount of waste was appalling.


Yeah, it's like water usage. I see the statistics claiming "Americans use blah, blah, blah amount of water per day each, OMFG THE HORROR!1" Is that just per capita and includes industrial usage? If so it's a useless statistic.
 
2018-04-20 11:30:16 PM  
Between 2007 and 2014, U.S. consumers wasted nearly 150,000 tons of food per day.

Subby must have thought that using 3 more zeros in the headline was a waste.
 
2018-04-20 11:59:43 PM  
Math
 
2018-04-21 12:18:41 AM  

RJReves: I was raised poor, and one thing stuck with me. Waste not, want not. I am a *thrifty* person.

Also have done time helping in food banks.

IMHO, no one deserves to go hungry. The issue is logistical.

As Kinnison said..............


I volunteer with a small (a dozen people) non-profit in Maryland that rescues food that would otherwise be tossed, and distributes it to needy families and homeless shelters.

Picking up from just TWO large local grocery stores on Saturday and Sunday, we rescued about 65,000 pounds of food in the last 12 months.

And that's just the stuff good enough to save. Probably a tenth of what they pull from the shelves every week.
 
2018-04-21 12:40:53 AM  

MrBallou: Probably a tenth of what they pull from the shelves every week.


^this^
A huge amount of "wasted" food in the US is based on the lunatic-capitalist idea that if you have something with an expiration date that it's better to let it spoil, or even intentionally ruin it when it reaches that date, rather than give it to a poor person or reduce the price as it nears the expiration.  Because if you do that - in theory - everyone would just wait to buy nearly expired things every time and the market price of your thing would forever decrease in a never ending spiral until it was worthless.
 
2018-04-21 01:04:14 AM  
This can only be labeled as a public health service. Can you imagine if they DIDN'T waste all this food ?!
 
2018-04-21 01:07:09 AM  
I rarely toss food out as I like making leftovers into other meals. but in the past week I had to throw out a dozen eggs and a bag of salad (Romaine lettuce) because of recent food recalls. And it seems like the recalls are happening more frequently.
 
2018-04-21 01:29:36 AM  
RJReves:  As Kinnison said..............

"Pee pee hurt, time to die"?
"HEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHE"?
"YOU BIIIIIAAAAATTCCCH YOU BROKE MYHEARTYOULYINGWHOOORRE"?
 
2018-04-21 01:55:12 AM  
Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.
 
2018-04-21 02:11:02 AM  
Each?
 
2018-04-21 02:16:59 AM  

morg: Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.


Well we have learned something about you but personally I do not eat shiat for breakfast
 
2018-04-21 02:46:13 AM  

morg: Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.


What if you are already running a razor thin margin at the price you sell the perfect shiat?  A varying rate based on quality would mean you are shipping the imperfect stuff for next to nothing.  Then people who WOULD have bought the perfect pack buy your cheap stuff instead and you just lost your own money.
 
2018-04-21 03:51:11 AM  

omnimancer28: morg: Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.

What if you are already running a razor thin margin at the price you sell the perfect shiat?  A varying rate based on quality would mean you are shipping the imperfect stuff for next to nothing.  Then people who WOULD have bought the perfect pack buy your cheap stuff instead and you just lost your own money.


That's what I'm getting at. It costs the same to process and ship the imperfect product but you need to sell it for less. I don't know if that's really the case but whatever it is I just want to stop seeing these articles blaming consumers for throwing out food. They're talking about stuff that is never delivered to consumers. Investigate the process.
 
2018-04-21 04:41:21 AM  
I think they have their statistics confused. I'm fairly certain the statistics they're referring to count all waste, everything from the farm down to the consumer, so about half of that happens long before the food even reach people.

As far as my house, I doubt I throw away more than 2-3 pounds per month, unless they count scraps like the fat I trim off meat, fruit peals, or other such things.
 
2018-04-21 04:59:42 AM  

morg: Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.


You're not the first person to realize this - Imperfect Produce bases their entire business model on that premise.
 
2018-04-21 06:31:31 AM  
My roommate was real bad with waste when she was drinking.  She would go drunk shopping, buy a bunch of fresh stuff and eat some of it. One time I dumped out the crisper when it turned to a black sludge. It took forever to clean , she got mad at me but I had pictures.
 
2018-04-21 07:15:05 AM  

FormlessOne: morg: Once again I believe that they are talking about food that is never presented to consumers.
Is it more cost effective to produce a bunch of shiat, throw away the imperfect shiat during initial processing, then sell the perfect shiat for top dollar than it is to produce less, process, ship, and charge a varying rate based on quality? I think people would buy imperfect shiat if the price fit.

You're not the first person to realize this - Imperfect Produce bases their entire business model on that premise.


Quick plug for one of my wife's old students who has started a business making juice from ugly fruit.

Misfit Juicery
 
2018-04-21 07:35:41 AM  

ThomasPaineTrain: slackananda: "Every day in the United States, consumers throw out nearly a pound of food each, according to new research."

I would have guessed it's more than that.

Some of us were raised to be members of the clean plate club, tyvm.


Food only gets thrown out here if it goes bad. Otherwise it gets recycled for leftovers for another day or, if it's a small quantity, gets given to the dogs. I just cannot understand throwing out food like that. You're throwing away money you morons.
 
2018-04-21 07:39:49 AM  

ReapTheChaos: I think they have their statistics confused. I'm fairly certain the statistics they're referring to count all waste, everything from the farm down to the consumer, so about half of that happens long before the food even reach people.

As far as my house, I doubt I throw away more than 2-3 pounds per month, unless they count scraps like the fat I trim off meat, fruit peals, or other such things.


They probably count fat, and edible peels like apple and potato.
 
2018-04-21 07:55:20 AM  
I remember when I worked as a bus boy for a while in a restaurant there was something they called a pig bucket.

It was where we scraped all the uneaten food before tossing the dishes to the dishwashers.

That farker filled up fast.
 
2018-04-21 08:28:13 AM  
I work for a company which supplies both restaurants and grocery stores with produce. Any waste that is still edible (close dated salads, damaged cases, etc) are distributed to a couple local food pantries, any food in other conditions, (bruises, mold, damaged produce) are donated to a local pig farmer.
Over the last decade, we have made an effort to cut down on our waste.
 
2018-04-21 08:38:19 AM  
When I worked for the football concession stands in college, one of the hard parts was gauging the amount to toss on the grill at the end of the game. Anything sealed could be frozen for the next game, but cooked food couldn't. It was a bit of a balance- how much to cook, versus what I was going to have to dispose of (and we would pay for). We got pretty good- it wasn't uncommon to only have a few dozen burgers/hot dogs left, and those we gave away or kept since we were paying for them anyway. No sense in wasting them. I did make a six-tier burger for a guy. Basically an In n Out 6x6 (pound and a half precooked), free since we were closing up.
 
2018-04-21 08:57:56 AM  

Sid_6.7: I've always been a bit confused about the concept of food waste. If we don't crack open the bones and suck out the marrow, is that food waste? If not, why not?

"Just because a banana has a bruise on it, doesn't mean we have to throw it away," Niles said, "and we can repurpose it," Niles said.

Here's an idea, Niles: shove it up your ass.


Do not GIS that
 
2018-04-21 09:38:53 AM  
150,000 tons of food is what the politics tab call a snack
 
2018-04-21 01:20:50 PM  

MrBallou: RJReves: I was raised poor, and one thing stuck with me. Waste not, want not. I am a *thrifty* person.

Also have done time helping in food banks.

IMHO, no one deserves to go hungry. The issue is logistical.

As Kinnison said..............

I volunteer with a small (a dozen people) non-profit in Maryland that rescues food that would otherwise be tossed, and distributes it to needy families and homeless shelters.

Picking up from just TWO large local grocery stores on Saturday and Sunday, we rescued about 65,000 pounds of food in the last 12 months.

And that's just the stuff good enough to save. Probably a tenth of what they pull from the shelves every week.


So I wonder how much of it is individual food waste versus restaurant/grocery store food waste
 
2018-04-21 01:39:19 PM  

RJReves: As Kinnison said..............


"Chest pains, AHHHHH!"
 
2018-04-21 02:06:43 PM  
It is Gresham's Law of Food:  Bad food drives out good.

Try the experiment. Put some left-over junk food in the refrigerator and add some fresh veggies and fruit.

Have you ever noticed that valid rules of thumb can be applied to a remarkably disparate collection of things and situations?

Evolution, for example, is not just the key doctrine of biology. It works for economics and everything.
 
2018-04-21 02:08:43 PM  
I have super-chocolaty chocolate-coated ice cream bars in the freezer. Guess what percentage of the carrots I will eat today. For experts only: guess what percentage of ice cream will be in icecream cones with peanuts or almonds.
 
2018-04-21 02:09:25 PM  
Super-advanced riddle: what percentage of my nuts will be a) peanuts and b) cashews?
 
2018-04-21 05:52:24 PM  
Wife buys prepackaged food, eats a couple of things from it, then it gets shoved to the back of the refrigerator or pantry by newer stuff - where it sits until we do a clean out. I find things I didn't know we had and gladly would have eaten.
 
2018-04-21 07:47:45 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Sid_6.7: I've always been a bit confused about the concept of food waste. If we don't crack open the bones and suck out the marrow, is that food waste? If not, why not?

"Just because a banana has a bruise on it, doesn't mean we have to throw it away," Niles said, "and we can repurpose it," Niles said.

Here's an idea, Niles: shove it up your ass.

Do not GIS that


Like some sort of "Ass Smoothie" for instance?

/do it
/you know you want to
 
2018-04-21 11:19:00 PM  

brantgoose: Super-advanced riddle: what percentage of my nuts will be a) peanuts and b) cashews?


A peanut is not a nut.
 
2018-04-22 06:40:42 AM  
In my Logic course I call this one the "Fallacy of the Long Lever" - take some insignificantly tiny number and multiply it by a really big number to come up with something that sounds click baity. It's the kind of "logic" that claims that email wastes so many hours of work per year and such. Fifteen thousand tons of food divided by the population of the USA is an ounce or so per person.
 
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