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(Some Guy)   IBM introduces the world's smallest computer. FYI ... the keyboard is useless   ( coolhunting.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Computer, IBM Think, tech company, Computer program, computing power, blockchain applications, release date, data source  
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2563 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Mar 2018 at 12:08 AM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-03-21 11:35:48 PM  
At IBM Think 2018, the tech company unveiled what they claim is the world's smallest computer. The machine (smaller than a grain of sea salt) cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip. That's enough for it to be "a data source for blockchain applications," according to Mashable, who notes that its purpose will be to "monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data" pertaining to bitcoin.

Oh, FFS.
 
2018-03-21 11:43:49 PM  
Nvidia puts 4000-5000 GPU cores into one card. The fact you can put a full x86 machine into a grain of sand is a start, they'll need to put thousands of them into chips and cards and make them addressible before they're useful.
 
2018-03-22 12:15:21 AM  
FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.
 
2018-03-22 12:27:02 AM  
So a news aggregator is now linking to a news aggregator posing as a news site?  How meta.
 
2018-03-22 12:29:34 AM  
I hope they don't cost too much because they are going to be VERY easy to lose.
 
2018-03-22 12:30:32 AM  

Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.


My guess would be a 386.
 
2018-03-22 12:35:22 AM  

Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.


"Old 16-bit piece of shiat" doesn't sound as "techy."
 
2018-03-22 12:47:33 AM  

Sid_6.7: At IBM Think 2018, the tech company unveiled what they claim is the world's smallest computer. The machine (smaller than a grain of sea salt) cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip. That's enough for it to be "a data source for blockchain applications," according to Mashable, who notes that its purpose will be to "monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data" pertaining to bitcoin.

Oh, FFS.


I am ineluctably reminded of the later part of the story of "slow glass", where the whole word was being dusted with minute bits of it, so everything everywhere was under surveillance.
 
2018-03-22 12:48:41 AM  

IHadMeAVision: Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.

"Old 16-bit piece of shiat" doesn't sound as "techy."


But can it run Linux?
 
2018-03-22 12:48:48 AM  

Sid_6.7: At IBM Think 2018, the tech company unveiled what they claim is the world's smallest computer. The machine (smaller than a grain of sea salt) cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip. That's enough for it to be "a data source for blockchain applications," according to Mashable, who notes that its purpose will be to "monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data" pertaining to bitcoin.


P.S. FTA "Right now there's no release date and the application of it, well that's up to the imagination."
               Fourth and final sentence of the "article".
               Note: Link to mashable contains slightly more content.
 
2018-03-22 12:50:26 AM  
As the world makes the shift from fiat currencies to cryptocurrencies, devices like this will become very important in the maintenance of the blockchain.

I mean, imagine a Beowulf cluster of these.
 
2018-03-22 12:51:26 AM  
Can I play "Red Baron" on it?

If so, I'm sold.
 
2018-03-22 01:07:28 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: As the world makes the shift from fiat currencies to cryptocurrencies


The world is not doing this.
 
2018-03-22 01:15:26 AM  

wildcardjack: Nvidia puts 4000-5000 GPU cores into one card. The fact you can put a full x86 machine into a grain of sand is a start, they'll need to put thousands of them into chips and cards and make them addressible before they're useful.


Those are just cores, though.

I don't know anything about this that's not in the article, but if what the article is saying is true, that they've fit a whole computer of comparable power to an 8086 into a grain of sand, that's a little trickier than just a processor core.  It would have to have memory (presumably around 512K, "all anyone will ever need", if it's comparable to an x86), provisions for input and output.  I'm assuming input and output is just voltages on pins, kind of like a microcontroller, but who knows--it could have Ethernet.

Network a bunch of these computers and you could have a decent special-purpose parallel machine.  It would different from GPU cores since each computer run its own program, suitable for certain problems.  (Presumably bitcoin operations.)
 
2018-03-22 01:21:59 AM  

itcamefromschenectady: I am ineluctably reminded of the later part of the story of "slow glass", where the whole word was being dusted with minute bits of it, so everything everywhere was under surveillance.


See also: Vernor Vinge
 
2018-03-22 01:24:11 AM  
All we are is bitcoins in the wind...
 
2018-03-22 01:54:56 AM  

IHadMeAVision: Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.

"Old 16-bit piece of shiat" doesn't sound as "techy."


I'm fairly certain these are at least 32 bit.
 
2018-03-22 01:57:30 AM  
Articles like this make me want to get my framed Comp Sci diploma out of storage and smash it over TFA's head.
 
2018-03-22 02:00:38 AM  
Installing my computer be like ...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-22 02:05:31 AM  
Just find a way to plug this one in:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-22 02:06:01 AM  

Sid_6.7: At IBM Think 2018, the tech company unveiled what they claim is the world's smallest computer. The machine (smaller than a grain of sea salt) cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip. That's enough for it to be "a data source for blockchain applications," according to Mashable, who notes that its purpose will be to "monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data" pertaining to bitcoin.

Oh, FFS.


But will it run Doom on a 9600 baud modem?
 
2018-03-22 04:47:01 AM  

Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.


Sandy Bridge
 
2018-03-22 04:51:24 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: As the world makes the shift from fiat currencies to cryptocurrencies, devices like this will become very important in the maintenance of the blockchain.

I mean, imagine a Beowulf cluster of these.


lol

Are there any goods and services that can be traded for cryptocurrencies anymore?

Or is it all now just a method of turning real money into data and *hopefully* back again so you can buy something? You know, like regular everyday internet banking, except with risk.
 
2018-03-22 04:52:16 AM  

itcamefromschenectady: Sid_6.7: At IBM Think 2018, the tech company unveiled what they claim is the world's smallest computer. The machine (smaller than a grain of sea salt) cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip. That's enough for it to be "a data source for blockchain applications," according to Mashable, who notes that its purpose will be to "monitor, analyze, communicate, and even act on data" pertaining to bitcoin.

Oh, FFS.

I am ineluctably reminded of the later part of the story of "slow glass", where the whole word was being dusted with minute bits of it, so everything everywhere was under surveillance.


Or "Dust" in Endless Space.
 
2018-03-22 05:36:21 AM  

dyhchong: AverageAmericanGuy: As the world makes the shift from fiat currencies to cryptocurrencies, devices like this will become very important in the maintenance of the blockchain.

I mean, imagine a Beowulf cluster of these.

lol

Are there any goods and services that can be traded for cryptocurrencies anymore?

Or is it all now just a method of turning real money into data and *hopefully* back again so you can buy something? You know, like regular everyday internet banking, except with risk.


Not risk...Excitement! Roller coasters are fun, remember? It's adrenaline in your wallet.
 
2018-03-22 07:28:31 AM  
wtf is coolhunting.com?  Looks like a zergnet-style click-farm.

Why not link to the original article?
 
2018-03-22 10:04:27 AM  

Ghastly: FTFA: cost less than 10 cents to manufacture and has the computing power of an old x86 chip.

Computing power of an x86? Is that a 8086? 186? 286? 386? 486? Kinda makes a difference.


Will they all have turbo buttons?
 
2018-03-22 11:04:59 AM  
It seems you will not have to worry about finding a tiny power supply, they are solar powered.
 
2018-03-22 11:13:04 AM  
Yet another MCU.
 
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