If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Nola.com)   Despite what the big brown doey eyes of the therapy peacock tell you, it's time to ban emotional support animals   ( nola.com) divider line
    More: Sad  
•       •       •

5923 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2018 at 1:13 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



160 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-03-13 01:16:25 AM  
The rare headline that asks a question for which the answer is "YES!!!"
 
2018-03-13 01:16:45 AM  
Then however will I endure being in public?

s.yimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-13 01:17:43 AM  
Service animals have been around for a long time in the form of seeing-eye dogs for the blind.

If you're going to say that depression or anxiety is a disease, then it flows from that that service animals ought to be allowed for someone who needs it regardless of their disease, as long as the animal is there for assistance and not just as a pet.
 
2018-03-13 01:18:01 AM  
Are fake emotional support animals really a thing? Sure, I am aware that people will try to game the system. I even knew a guy who did that (got a hilariously untrained "handicap-assistance" dog when my apartment complex had banned pets.) But, is it big enough of a problem to warrant any kind of broad ban against them? It seems like it would be something less common than welfare fraud, another thing that certain parties wring their hands over.
 
2018-03-13 01:20:49 AM  
Great. Now my emotional support swarm of locusts are all abuzz and I have to calm them down. Oh, the irony.
 
2018-03-13 01:22:28 AM  
What about those of us who need a support animal for our lack of emotions?
 
2018-03-13 01:23:57 AM  
I intend to stand firm and let the peacocks multiply, for I am sure that, in the end, the last word will be theirs. -- Flannery O'Connor
 
2018-03-13 01:29:08 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Service animals have been around for a long time in the form of seeing-eye dogs for the blind.

If you're going to say that depression or anxiety is a disease, then it flows from that that service animals ought to be allowed for someone who needs it regardless of their disease, as long as the animal is there for assistance and not just as a pet.


Real service dogs get years of training. We are talking tens of thousands of doĺlars worth of training if someone had to pay it. Getting a note from your doctor to let you have a pet that might not even be trainable is making a mockery of the system.
 
2018-03-13 01:29:26 AM  
I'd have shot myself in the face by now if it weren't for my dog and even I think this stuff is bullshiat. Quit taking advantage of laws meant to help people that actually need the help.
 
2018-03-13 01:29:31 AM  
Emotional support animals should have some sort of training and regulation.  An "emotional support" peacock should be required to go through training and exposure to strange situations for some form of certification.

I don't think emotional support animals need the same training as actual service animals, but there has to be a happy medium.
 
2018-03-13 01:29:34 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Service animals have been around for a long time in the form of seeing-eye dogs for the blind.

If you're going to say that depression or anxiety is a disease, then it flows from that that service animals ought to be allowed for someone who needs it regardless of their disease, as long as the animal is there for assistance and not just as a pet.


There's a big difference between trained service animals and "emotional support" animals with Comic Sans "I'm working" badges.
 
2018-03-13 01:29:53 AM  
Yeah, we should just dope people up to their eyeballs with benzos the way nature intended!
 
2018-03-13 01:31:32 AM  

LoneWolf343: Are fake emotional support animals really a thing? Sure, I am aware that people will try to game the system. I even knew a guy who did that (got a hilariously untrained "handicap-assistance" dog when my apartment complex had banned pets.) But, is it big enough of a problem to warrant any kind of broad ban against them? It seems like it would be something less common than welfare fraud, another thing that certain parties wring their hands over.


Yes.  The abuse needs to be stopped.
 
2018-03-13 01:35:12 AM  
Along with children under 16 years of age.
 
2018-03-13 01:36:14 AM  
Isn't every pet an emotional support animal? If the definition of "emotional support animal" is an animal that makes me feel better, then we have two options. We can either allow pets on planes, in stores, restaurants, movie theaters, etc. and be done with it, or we can redefine the term to only include animals that are trained to, if nothing else, know how to behave in public places.

Personally I'm sick to death of hyperactive nervous ratdogs who clearly have no training whatsoever passing off as support animals because some entitled boomer with less common sense than a stick will raise an unholy stink if anybody says anything.
 
2018-03-13 01:39:44 AM  

wingedkat: Emotional support animals should have some sort of training and regulation.  An "emotional support" peacock should be required to go through training and exposure to strange situations for some form of certification.

I don't think emotional support animals need the same training as actual service animals, but there has to be a happy medium.


My dog is an emotional support animal with the doctor's note to show it.  I got her while going through a deep depression and she helps me deal with agoraphobia and social anxiety.  She is also well on her way to canine good citizenship and competes in a mature agility.

I can't imagine a situation in which I'd try to take her on a plane.  I think I'd have to drug her and it seems cruel.  I can take my own drugs to deal with the plane.
 
2018-03-13 01:41:13 AM  
hopefully, these emotional support animals will ease the pain of banning emotional support animals
 
2018-03-13 01:43:23 AM  
Buy them a seat and keep them crated for the duration of the flight.

Otherwise, no way Jose.

I have flown back and forth every six weeks for three years.

I have never been on a flight with an animal in the passenger cabin.
 
2018-03-13 01:50:04 AM  

LoneWolf343: Are fake emotional support animals really a thing? Sure, I am aware that people will try to game the system. I even knew a guy who did that (got a hilariously untrained "handicap-assistance" dog when my apartment complex had banned pets.) But, is it big enough of a problem to warrant any kind of broad ban against them? It seems like it would be something less common than welfare fraud, another thing that certain parties wring their hands over.


Fake animals aren't the problem. It's fake pet owners who are the problem. I live in the SF bay area and people totally abuse it here. It's not unusual to see more than one dog in the supermarket in one visit. It doesn't bother me, but no way they're all support animals. Stores are getting tired of it and putting up large signs at the entrances saying NO PETS!!! The signs suggest to me that customers are complaining.

In a weird somewhat related note, my bro in SF said the city went through Golden Gate park last week confiscating unfixed pit bulls from homeless people. Pit bulls are far and away the favorite breed for homeless people there and the city has rules against unfixed bigger dogs. He said they got eight or nine.
 
2018-03-13 01:50:28 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-13 01:51:42 AM  
No. Would you want to ban this...?
telegraph.co.ukView Full Size
 
2018-03-13 01:53:03 AM  

wingedkat: Emotional support animals should have some sort of training and regulation.  An "emotional support" peacock should be required to go through training and exposure to strange situations for some form of certification.

I don't think emotional support animals need the same training as actual service animals, but there has to be a happy medium.


It's commonly understood that your pet therapy animal is a great way to get exposed to some strange.
 
2018-03-13 01:53:26 AM  
There are scads of dogs and cats that want your love out there right now. I don't care if it's an "emotional suport" or not, they still need you!

My dog just friggin showed up one day. She had been gored by hogs, let alone been severely abused by her previous owners. I would rather have a cat, but I got a dog. She needs me more than I need her, and I'm fine with that.

But if you want or need a pet, please go adopt from your local animal shelter! My ex and I adopted two loving cats, and I'm not living with her but they still love me, and I get updates on how their doing. It's really nice!
 
2018-03-13 01:54:04 AM  
You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.
 
2018-03-13 01:55:03 AM  
As usual, animals are fine.

People are still dicks.
 
2018-03-13 01:57:08 AM  

GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.


Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.
 
2018-03-13 01:59:54 AM  
What's worse is when they keep it off leash in the stores.
 
2018-03-13 02:00:09 AM  

Weatherkiss: Yeah, we should just dope people up to their eyeballs with benzos the way nature intended!


Benzos are for pussies.  Speedballs, barbituates, XTC and DMT, let the good times roll.

Also, what if my emotional support animal is a human, and I always had her on a leash in public?  That should be totally mainstream by now.
 
2018-03-13 02:04:16 AM  

GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.


Many emotional support animals are untrained messes, that's true - it doesn't mean we need to ban emotional support animals.  It means that as you said, we need to come up with a training and certification program - probably the same one seeing eye dogs and other animals get as far as how to act.  In other words, about half the typical training program for other support animals.  They usually come with the instincts to move in and support an upset owner by being there, that doesn't require much training.  If your animal can pass that program and get certed, I don't give a flying fark what it is - good for you, bring it with you.  If it cannot, then you're going to have to stay home.  No cert, no animal.
Much like everything else in the world - because some people are assholes we cannot rely on the owner's word.  Even when some owners train the living hell out of their animals, and they behave perfectly.  Because for every one of those people, there are probably 6 or 7 dipshiats that just want to bring their pooping, noise-making, ruckus-raising whatever everywhere they go.
 
2018-03-13 02:05:19 AM  

Makh: What's worse is when they keep it off leash in the stores.


Did you know support animals eat free at Whole Foods?
 
2018-03-13 02:07:32 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Service animals have been around for a long time in the form of seeing-eye dogs for the blind.

If you're going to say that depression or anxiety is a disease, then it flows from that that service animals ought to be allowed for someone who needs it regardless of their disease, as long as the animal is there for assistance and not just as a pet.


If there were any real, peer reviewed science showing that therapy animals actually helped all that much, it would make sense. But that's not the case. Service animals are trained to perform a specific task, and there are penalties for lying about the status of a service animal. Support animals are not trained, and often pose a risk to those around them as a result because really, they're just pets. I love my cat. I suffer from anxiety and depression. Sometimes my cat makes it better. Sometimes he's an ahole and bites me. Because he's a cat.
 
2018-03-13 02:08:19 AM  

Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.


If you have a bad enough problem with something, not reacting is not an option unfortunately.  You will, even if you're hiding it pretty well - and that animal will know it.  Sucks but there ya go.  Stuff that approaches phobic level isn't really a controllable reaction for many

/thankfully, properly trained animals will ignore the hell out of your reaction, unless it's something that makes the owner feel truly threatened.
//even then almost all properly trained animals will simply interpose themselves between the threat and their person, and leave it at that
///when they do, I'd suggest giving them room if at all physically possible
 
2018-03-13 02:08:39 AM  
There is a distinct difference between an "emotional support animal" and a "service dog".  A service dog is defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) "Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person's disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA."(Note that ONLY dogs can become a true "service animal".
Further more:  "Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the individual's disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls."http://www.ada.gov/
 
2018-03-13 02:09:11 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Service animals have been around for a long time in the form of seeing-eye dogs for the blind.

If you're going to say that depression or anxiety is a disease, then it flows from that that service animals ought to be allowed for someone who needs it regardless of their disease, as long as the animal is there for assistance and not just as a pet.


I grew up in San Francisco and they had Peacocks wandering around on the same paths as the visitors. They were fine. Then I moved to a place many years later where my neighbors had their own Peacocks. They were assholes (the Peacocks, not the neighbors). They'd escape and fly up into a tree right outside my bedroom window and make this godawful cry that if you didn't know better sounded like a woman being murdered (this was in the middle of the night). The only way to get them to leave was with a BB gun pointed at their ass. Don't worry, I cleared it with my neighbor first and it was only three pumps (they have really thick feathers back there). That would chase them off for the night but they'd be back a day or two later. I don't think that Peacocks are very smart... even for birds.

/I once joked with the neighbor that Peacocks might make for good eating
//What? He kept chickens and cows
///yes it was a pretty rural area
 
2018-03-13 02:11:11 AM  

Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.


When you're instinctual impulse is to cringe, thats a hard sell.  Saying it is easy.

This is the trained reaction of a 4-year old who got mauled.  Saying "Don't react" is bullshiat.

I know how to handle myself around dogs.  I ignore them if possible.  They still know I dont like them, and their attitude quickly changes to match.
 
2018-03-13 02:11:14 AM  

zepillin: Buy them a seat and keep them crated for the duration of the flight.

Otherwise, no way Jose.

I have flown back and forth every six weeks for three years.

I have never been on a flight with an animal in the passenger cabin.


You probably have and just didn't notice. Most airlines allow cats and small dogs in the cabin, as long as they fit in a carrier under the seat.   Regular pets even, with or without with fake credentials.    Most airports even have pet-relief areas for the traveling dogs.
 
2018-03-13 02:11:20 AM  
I tell you what, peacocks are an absolute bugger to flush down an airplane toilet
 
2018-03-13 02:12:10 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Then however will I endure being in public?

[s.yimg.com image 500x333]


Wait. That's a BOY MOOSE! PERVERT!!!!!
 
2018-03-13 02:13:20 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.

If you have a bad enough problem with something, not reacting is not an option unfortunately.  You will, even if you're hiding it pretty well - and that animal will know it.  Sucks but there ya go.  Stuff that approaches phobic level isn't really a controllable reaction for many

/thankfully, properly trained animals will ignore the hell out of your reaction, unless it's something that makes the owner feel truly threatened.
//even then almost all properly trained animals will simply interpose themselves between the threat and their person, and leave it at that
///when they do, I'd suggest giving them room if at all physically possible


This is true, but knowledge is power. You must be cognizantly aware of your own shortcomings and remedy them in real time when the situation arises.
 
2018-03-13 02:13:44 AM  

LoneWolf343: Are fake emotional support animals really a thing?


Yes.  Many, many years ago I worked at a Kinkos, and one of my co-workers had an "emotional therapy dog," and that thing was completely untrained.  I love dogs, and normally would consider a workplace dog an awesome thing, but this dog would bark at customers, growl at me and other co-workers, it was a total pain in the ass.  The weirdest part is it was a chocolate lab, and every single other chocolate lab I've ever met was a total sweetheart.  But not this jerk ass dog.

Eventually enough of us complained to the boss and he told her she would need to provide some kind of documentation that a doctor had prescribed the dog.  Suddenly, no dog at work.
 
2018-03-13 02:15:07 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.

If you have a bad enough problem with something, not reacting is not an option unfortunately.  You will, even if you're hiding it pretty well - and that animal will know it.  Sucks but there ya go.  Stuff that approaches phobic level isn't really a controllable reaction for many

/thankfully, properly trained animals will ignore the hell out of your reaction, unless it's something that makes the owner feel truly threatened.
//even then almost all properly trained animals will simply interpose themselves between the threat and their person, and leave it at that
///when they do, I'd suggest giving them room if at all physically possible


BINGO!  Thats what I said..  trained service animals are *trained* to ignore bad reactions like the one I involuntarily give.
 
2018-03-13 02:15:21 AM  

Radioactive Ass: I grew up in San Francisco and they had Peacocks wandering around on the same paths as the visitors.


I forgot to add that this was inside the SF Zoo. They seemed to like the non-poo flinging elephants and giraffes most of all.
 
2018-03-13 02:16:14 AM  

darkmythology: If there were any real, peer reviewed science showing that therapy animals actually helped all that much...


Umm - there is.  A fair amount of it.  A quick google and there ya go.  Not claiming that means we have to let anything run amuck because someone says it's a service animal - see my post a bit upthread.  All for licensing, training, etc.  But there really is plenty of actual science supporting (hah) the concept of support animals - that ship's docked and unloaded already.
Now we need to regulate it properly, like we do for pretty much every other sort of medical condition support.  Zero clue why we haven't already, frankly.  You wouldn't want a company making wheelchairs, or catheters with no standards, inspections, or safety requirements - why the heck is it ok that emotional support animals should be?

/at least I'd hope no one would want unregulated medical support items - mental or physical
//sure, set your own standards for drugs, surgical appliances, etc - surely the free market would prevent any abuse
///that was really, REALLY hard to type with a straight face
 
2018-03-13 02:18:31 AM  

GrogSmash: Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.

When you're instinctual impulse is to cringe, thats a hard sell.  Saying it is easy.

This is the trained reaction of a 4-year old who got mauled.  Saying "Don't react" is bullshiat.

I know how to handle myself around dogs.  I ignore them if possible.  They still know I dont like them, and their attitude quickly changes to match.


A dogs love or trust must be earned. Don't turn them away, because some of them have true intentions and just want to be your friend. My dog is a biatch and nothing I've done so far can shy her away from wanting human affection for everyone. I've never once seen her act aggressive in any way towards a human, and she sure as fark better not in my presence without cause. But dogs are gonna act that way.

I don't blame you or think I'll of you for feeling the way you do, not one bit. But if you are gonna be in their presence you have to adapt to what they are comfortable with. If you are gonna be all sketchy and sullen, they will pick up on that and react defensively. If anything, give them your hand, and let them sniff or bite it. I'd already got my scars from letting a pit sniff my hand and he went to bite down instead. It happens more than it should, but it does.
 
2018-03-13 02:19:48 AM  

Stibium: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.

If you have a bad enough problem with something, not reacting is not an option unfortunately.  You will, even if you're hiding it pretty well - and that animal will know it.  Sucks but there ya go.  Stuff that approaches phobic level isn't really a controllable reaction for many

/thankfully, properly trained animals will ignore the hell out of your reaction, unless it's something that makes the owner feel truly threatened.
//even then almost all properly trained animals will simply interpose themselves between the threat and their person, and leave it at that
///when they do, I'd suggest giving them room if at all physically possible

This is true, but knowledge is power. You must be cognizantly aware of your own shortcomings and remedy them in real time when the situation arises.


You try having something try to rip your farking face off at the age of 4.

And deal with someone like you saying it's your shortcomings that are the problem.

Remove your head from your ass.  I dont have a problem with dogs.  I avoid them.  I dont have a problem with service animals.  They are well trained enough to ignore my involuntary reaction.  I have a problem with pets that are labelled as service animals that have no training.
 
2018-03-13 02:19:51 AM  
I'm fine with the "emotional support animal" thing, as long as it means that I can emotionally abuse anyone that brings their support animal with them in public places. I mean...they should be able to take it, right? That's what the animal is for.

"Hey, that's a really nice emotional support animal. Does it help you to deal with being so stupid and ugly and fat and generally unlikable? And how old were you when your stepdad touched you in your naughty place? Can your support animal call the suicide hotline for you when you just can't take living your miserable life anymore?"

That kind of thing.
 
2018-03-13 02:20:46 AM  
If any person is so emotionally unstable as to require an animal constantly providing support, should that person really be out alone in public?

Wouldn't an emotional support fellow human being be more effective?

Would the person be better off seeing an emotional support psychiatrist?
 
2018-03-13 02:22:00 AM  

Stibium: This is true, but knowledge is power. You must be cognizantly aware of your own shortcomings and remedy them in real time when the situation arises.


This is not possible for most people at a level that will fool most animals.  100% not possible at all.  Sure, many people can control major, visible reactions, and not run around the room screaming "OMG it's gonna kill us all!" - but very, very few people in the world can control emotional reactions on the level that an animal will not notice.  You'd have to be a farking zen master with a cyberpunk chill implant.  Animals can smell the chemical changes that take place when the fear response kicks in, even if you play it off cooler than Superfly.  They will know.

/some can't even not run around screaming
//some reactions ARE THAT BAD - really
///regardless of therapy, medication short of complete sedation, and anything else you can think of.  Some people just can not do it
 
2018-03-13 02:22:11 AM  

GrogSmash: Stibium: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Stibium: GrogSmash: You want that animal for support, fine.  Train and certify it.

I ...  do not like dogs.  I have a couple of fun scars on my face that I keep clean shaven to hide (stark white against the brown) where an abused dog tried its damnedest to rip my lips off, but it got its fangs hooked under my lower jaw, so it just shock me like a rag doll until it was shot by my father.

I react poorly to dogs, they know it, and its a vicious cycle now.

A trained service dog doesn't raise my hackles, and its trained to ignore raised hackles.  It sits there when not serving while on duty and doesn't bother snyone (except those with allergies).

These emotional support animals..  are pets.  No training, get freaked out in weird situations, attack people...  and all the owner has to say is "It's a support animal!".

fark that with a bag of hammers.

Don't react to dogs. Just don't. If you react with anything but indifference they will take that as a sign to come closer to you.

I'm sorry you had to go through what you did. If it's any consolation, my dog got cut up by feral hogs, and her scars are also white against her brown fur.

If you have a bad enough problem with something, not reacting is not an option unfortunately.  You will, even if you're hiding it pretty well - and that animal will know it.  Sucks but there ya go.  Stuff that approaches phobic level isn't really a controllable reaction for many

/thankfully, properly trained animals will ignore the hell out of your reaction, unless it's something that makes the owner feel truly threatened.
//even then almost all properly trained animals will simply interpose themselves between the threat and their person, and leave it at that
///when they do, I'd suggest giving them room if at all physically possible

This is true, but knowledge is power. You must be cognizantly aware of your own shortcomings and remedy them in real time when the situation arises.

You try having something try to rip your farking face off at the age of 4.

And deal with someone like you saying it's your shortcomings that are the problem.

Remove your head from your ass.  I dont have a problem with dogs.  I avoid them.  I dont have a problem with service animals.  They are well trained enough to ignore my involuntary reaction.  I have a problem with pets that are labelled as service animals that have no training.


Remove thine own head from thy ass. Very few dogs want to rip your face off, even fewer when you don't present your face as a target. Just be cool and the vast majority of dogs will react in kind.

I'm not judging you. I am saying you are being super defensive and that's part of why dogs are weirded out by you. I don't even like dogs and I know this.
 
2018-03-13 02:23:36 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Stibium: This is true, but knowledge is power. You must be cognizantly aware of your own shortcomings and remedy them in real time when the situation arises.

This is not possible for most people at a level that will fool most animals.  100% not possible at all.  Sure, many people can control major, visible reactions, and not run around the room screaming "OMG it's gonna kill us all!" - but very, very few people in the world can control emotional reactions on the level that an animal will not notice.  You'd have to be a farking zen master with a cyberpunk chill implant.  Animals can smell the chemical changes that take place when the fear response kicks in, even if you play it off cooler than Superfly.  They will know.

/some can't even not run around screaming
//some reactions ARE THAT BAD - really
///regardless of therapy, medication short of complete sedation, and anything else you can think of.  Some people just can not do it


I've weirded my amygdala and burnt out all other instinctive responses, so I'm about as close as a zen master as I can. Give my left hand to sniff, and my right hand near my blade to kill. That sort of thing
 
Displayed 50 of 160 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report