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(Bloomberg)   Sending spacecraft to mine asteroids might seem like an improbable ambition best left to science fiction. But it's inching closer to reality. Bruce Willis, Owen Wilson, Ben Affleck, Michael Clarke Duncan unavailable for comment   ( bloomberg.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Space exploration, Outer space, asteroid mining, asteroids, NASA, Deep Space Industries, Asteroid, valuable known asteroid  
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596 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Mar 2018 at 11:11 AM (27 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-03-08 09:30:52 AM  
Sadly, Michael Clarke Duncan is the only one who is unavailable for comment. RIP

Recognize his girlfriend that supposedly tried to save him with CPR?
img.fark.netView Full Size


/threadjack out
 
2018-03-08 10:12:55 AM  
Armageddon is one of the worst movies ever.
 
2018-03-08 10:17:36 AM  
I have extensive training in reducing asteroids to manageable size. Sign me up!

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-08 10:23:51 AM  

Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the ^ best worst movies ever.


FTFY
 
2018-03-08 10:44:49 AM  

slackananda: I have extensive training in reducing asteroids to manageable size. Sign me up!

[img.fark.net image 840x525]


Great. Now I have a non-song earworm for the day ...

dun dun, dun dun, dun dun, PEW PEW PEW, dun dun, dun dun
 
2018-03-08 11:01:08 AM  
Good luck finding anyone willing to go mine asteroids now that Frontier has removed the mining missions.

/Obscure?
 
2018-03-08 11:16:29 AM  
Not as long as we have President Dipshiat and his Vanishing Administration we don't.

Get back to us when a Democrat's in office.
 
2018-03-08 11:17:32 AM  

Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the worst movies ever.


"Let's split this asteroid the size of Texas in two by drilling 800 feet into it and dropping a nuke. That'll surely work!"
 
2018-03-08 11:18:57 AM  
Everyone who laughed at the 'high frontier' ideas that were published in the 60s and 70s can STFU now.  Turns out we were just waiting for much better computers, composites, and a few other technologies, so we could do advanced manufacturing, detailed simulations, and really good flight controls.

Bezos, Allen, Branson, Musk, Rutan, et alia are characters right out of Heinlein or Pournelle.
 
2018-03-08 11:19:14 AM  
I knew all my hours in KSP would pay off.
 
2018-03-08 11:21:23 AM  

slackananda: I have extensive training in reducing asteroids to manageable size. Sign me up!

[img.fark.net image 840x525]


and updated
img.fark.netView Full Size

/some nights mining asteroids is the right amount of monotony to de-stress with at the end of the day
//that is until you hear 'programming limpet drone' in your head... repeatedly
 
2018-03-08 11:22:16 AM  

Petey4335: slackananda: I have extensive training in reducing asteroids to manageable size. Sign me up!

[img.fark.net image 840x525]

and updated
[img.fark.net image 850x531]
/some nights mining asteroids is the right amount of monotony to de-stress with at the end of the day
//that is until you hear 'programming limpet drone' in your head... repeatedly


Sure, but with mining missions removed how are you making any real money from it?
 
2018-03-08 11:23:38 AM  
The companies involved will have to lie about inventory in order to maintain prices, it's going to be De Beers IN SPAAAAAACE
 
2018-03-08 11:24:51 AM  

whidbey: Not as long as we have President Dipshiat and his Vanishing Administration we don't.

Get back to us when a Democrat's in office.


So they can cut more space exploration programs?
 
2018-03-08 11:27:39 AM  

Saiga410: whidbey: Not as long as we have President Dipshiat and his Vanishing Administration we don't.

Get back to us when a Democrat's in office.

So they can cut more space exploration programs?


Because of Republicans. Which we also need to vote out.

The simple fact is we need a one party rule for about 50 years to clean up the damage your party's caused, dude.
 
2018-03-08 11:29:29 AM  

redoctober65: Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the ^ best worst movies ever.

FTFY


You are wrong. So very, very wrong. How goes it feel to wake up every day being so wrong?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-08 11:31:48 AM  

whidbey: Saiga410: whidbey: Not as long as we have President Dipshiat and his Vanishing Administration we don't.

Get back to us when a Democrat's in office.

So they can cut more space exploration programs?

Because of Republicans. Which we also need to vote out.

The simple fact is we need a one party rule for about 50 years to clean up the damage your party's caused, dude.


What the fark does that have to do with space exploration? Democrats have defunded NASA even more than Republicans have.

Politics tab is --------------------------------------​-------------------------^
 
2018-03-08 11:32:09 AM  

Dimensio: Good luck finding anyone willing to go mine asteroids now that Frontier has removed the mining missions.

/Obscure?


Wait.  3.0 removed my de-stressing cash cow?  Mother Q@#@#.  It was bad enough I read somewhere my Osmium hunting grounds in 20 Opiuchi are no longer pristine reserves.  I used to be able to make a few mil and hour on Osmium missions @Artsebarsky.  I've been busy with ancient and guardian sites along with engineering to mine in the past week.
 
2018-03-08 11:35:29 AM  
Good luck bridging the miners with the deep pockets needed for this.  Best bet: find a high platinum asteroid and get Toyota on board.  Toyota has invested a lot of face (and presumably money) into fuel cells, which doesn't appear too likely unless an abundant catalyst is found.  Solution: make platinum abundant.  This has the advantage in that is doesn't have to be *all* that economical, just enough to make Toyota cough up the dough to avoid admitting that fuel cells will never happen.
/difficulty: platinum asteroids appear mythical
//of course, if there was a vein in a planet that later broke up...
///but presumably the thing broke up while still molten (thus are mostly well mixed nickle and/or iron).
 
2018-03-08 11:37:35 AM  

yet_another_wumpus: Good luck bridging the miners with the deep pockets needed for this.  Best bet: find a high platinum asteroid and get Toyota on board.  Toyota has invested a lot of face (and presumably money) into fuel cells, which doesn't appear too likely unless an abundant catalyst is found.  Solution: make platinum abundant.  This has the advantage in that is doesn't have to be *all* that economical, just enough to make Toyota cough up the dough to avoid admitting that fuel cells will never happen.
/difficulty: platinum asteroids appear mythical
//of course, if there was a vein in a planet that later broke up...
///but presumably the thing broke up while still molten (thus are mostly well mixed nickle and/or iron).


With our luck, the platinum would be on one of Jupiter's most scenic moons, and they'd have to totally fark it up to get to it.
 
2018-03-08 11:37:55 AM  
All snark aside-why would we NOT mine asteroids, or the moon, or Mars, or many of the other moons in our solar system? It isn't exactly like we've been hesitant to carve into the one planet that we actually LIVE on.

Maybe we're not quite there, yet, but the tech is certainly getting us closer every day. There are billions of metric tons of a variety of ores literally floating around and available once we can reach it and make it cost effective to either bring it back, or to use it to build and develop outside our atmosphere.
 
2018-03-08 11:37:59 AM  

Petey4335: Dimensio: Good luck finding anyone willing to go mine asteroids now that Frontier has removed the mining missions.

/Obscure?


Wait.  3.0 removed my de-stressing cash cow?  Mother Q@#@#.  It was bad enough I read somewhere my Osmium hunting grounds in 20 Opiuchi are no longer pristine reserves.  I used to be able to make a few mil and hour on Osmium missions @Artsebarsky.  I've been busy with ancient and guardian sites along with engineering to mine in the past week.


The measure is supposed to be temporary until Frontier can fix an exploit that the revision in mission templates created with mining missions. Specifically, they need to find a way to avert this:

Elite:Dangerous - Cash for Gold
Youtube 4W5Jx2uc40w
 
2018-03-08 12:08:51 PM  

capn' fun: All snark aside-why would we NOT mine asteroids, or the moon, or Mars, or many of the other moons in our solar system? It isn't exactly like we've been hesitant to carve into the one planet that we actually LIVE on.

Maybe we're not quite there, yet, but the tech is certainly getting us closer every day. There are billions of metric tons of a variety of ores literally floating around and available once we can reach it and make it cost effective to either bring it back, or to use it to build and develop outside our atmosphere.


You'd be surprised at how little tech is still needed to mine asteroids.  Certainly harpooning, pushing is unknown (Philae failed to work, I can't remember anyone trying since).  Some form of power needed (or stick to asteroids far inside the asteroid belt and solar, but I suspect that wide solar reflectors would work just fine.  Nuclear [not RTG, the big stuff] if you are willing to deal with the political fallout).  Landing the thing is also an issue: shape the thing or just chuck a mostly round asteroid down onto the Outback/Siberia? I imagine Russians will be easier to deal with laws, especially if you buy their launch services.
 
2018-03-08 12:09:59 PM  
 
2018-03-08 12:13:27 PM  
The very first company (it will not be a country) to mine the first asteroid and utilise the result will rule the solar system from that point onward.

They will have so much available cash they will just dominate everything on Earth financially. In addition, they will have the first access to resources like metals, hydrogen, and oxygen without having to drag it out of our gravity well.

Elon Musk might yet turn out to be scorpio...
 
2018-03-08 12:18:22 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: capn' fun: All snark aside-why would we NOT mine asteroids, or the moon, or Mars, or many of the other moons in our solar system? It isn't exactly like we've been hesitant to carve into the one planet that we actually LIVE on.

Maybe we're not quite there, yet, but the tech is certainly getting us closer every day. There are billions of metric tons of a variety of ores literally floating around and available once we can reach it and make it cost effective to either bring it back, or to use it to build and develop outside our atmosphere.

You'd be surprised at how little tech is still needed to mine asteroids.  Certainly harpooning, pushing is unknown (Philae failed to work, I can't remember anyone trying since).  Some form of power needed (or stick to asteroids far inside the asteroid belt and solar, but I suspect that wide solar reflectors would work just fine.  Nuclear [not RTG, the big stuff] if you are willing to deal with the political fallout).  Landing the thing is also an issue: shape the thing or just chuck a mostly round asteroid down onto the Outback/Siberia? I imagine Russians will be easier to deal with laws, especially if you buy their launch services.


I would imagine that if we can figure out a cost effective way to get to an asteroid, all you'd need is a crew of 3-5 to oversee the mission and the robots doing all the actual work. And "robots" doesn't have to mean more than industrial arms, diggers, and grabbers. Bring it back to orbit in containers with built-in inflatables (which could be launched folded and then unfolded and loaded on-site), splash them, and then inflate to bring them to the surface. Send out a ship with an appropriate crane, and you've got yourself asteroid ore. The crew can splash down, too, land in a capsule as they do now, or land in a re-usable (like the shuttle or the new SpaceX re-usables).
 
2018-03-08 12:47:07 PM  
Phssthpok eagerly awaits our arrival
 
2018-03-08 12:47:12 PM  

redoctober65: Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the ^ best worst movies ever.

FTFY


Have to agree with this. The movie is demonstratively horrible, yet I could watch it over and over for some stupid reason.
 
2018-03-08 12:53:50 PM  

Cortez the Killer: redoctober65: Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the ^ best worst movies ever.

FTFY

Have to agree with this. The movie is demonstratively horrible, yet I could watch it over and over for some stupid reason.


Kind of like "The Day After Tomorrow."
 
2018-03-08 01:14:37 PM  
whidbey:
Kind of like "The Day After Tomorrow."

God I remember getting dirty looks in the theater as I am laughing throughout the movie.  Great film.
 
2018-03-08 01:19:48 PM  

Saiga410: whidbey:
Kind of like "The Day After Tomorrow."

God I remember getting dirty looks in the theater as I am laughing throughout the movie.  Great film.


I love it when all the wolves show up.
 
2018-03-08 01:37:33 PM  
cinema52.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-08 02:56:52 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: The companies involved will have to lie about inventory in order to maintain prices, it's going to be De Beers IN SPAAAAAACE


I seem to recall reading an article that theorized the amount of precious metals in even one asteroid would be enough to completely flood the world markets, sending prices through the floor.  If they want to avoid that they will absolutely need to artificially restrict availability --which I'm uncomfortable with just on principle.
 
2018-03-08 03:10:59 PM  
Hmm, The article says they are sending a probe, Osiris-Rex, to collect samples from an asteroid.

From the graphic explaining the mission:
When Osiris-Rex is in place above Bennu's surface, it will extend an articulated arm with a device to collect samples, the Touch-and-Go Sample Acquisition Mechanism (TAGSAM).

Finally, TAGSAM's arm will put the sampler head into a capsule that will stay sealed until it is opened by scientists back on Earth.


We've all seen some version of this movie before. None of the outcomes bode well for mankind.
 
2018-03-08 03:30:40 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: capn' fun: All snark aside-why would we NOT mine asteroids, or the moon, or Mars, or many of the other moons in our solar system? It isn't exactly like we've been hesitant to carve into the one planet that we actually LIVE on.

Maybe we're not quite there, yet, but the tech is certainly getting us closer every day. There are billions of metric tons of a variety of ores literally floating around and available once we can reach it and make it cost effective to either bring it back, or to use it to build and develop outside our atmosphere.

You'd be surprised at how little tech is still needed to mine asteroids.  Certainly harpooning, pushing is unknown (Philae failed to work, I can't remember anyone trying since).  Some form of power needed (or stick to asteroids far inside the asteroid belt and solar, but I suspect that wide solar reflectors would work just fine.  Nuclear [not RTG, the big stuff] if you are willing to deal with the political fallout).  Landing the thing is also an issue: shape the thing or just chuck a mostly round asteroid down onto the Outback/Siberia? I imagine Russians will be easier to deal with laws, especially if you buy their launch services.


The whole goal of mining in space is having raw materials in space.  The cost of launching a pound into space is around $10,000 (citation citation).  Reusable rockets (SpaceX) will reduce that cost, but it will still be pretty high.  If you can get a few satellites up in space mining the raw materials, to stay in space, you will reduce the overall costs of manufacturing and maintaining things in space by quite a lot.  But grabbing a space object and pulling it back to earth, that's not nearly as cost effective as mining what's already on earth, or recycling what has already been mined.
 
2018-03-08 05:09:47 PM  

Keeve: Hmm, The article says they are sending a probe, Osiris-Rex, to collect samples from an asteroid.

From the graphic explaining the mission:
When Osiris-Rex is in place above Bennu's surface, it will extend an articulated arm with a device to collect samples, the Touch-and-Go Sample Acquisition Mechanism (TAGSAM).

Finally, TAGSAM's arm will put the sampler head into a capsule that will stay sealed until it is opened by scientists back on Earth.

We've all seen some version of this movie before. None of the outcomes bode well for mankind.


Species, The Andromeda Strain and 2001 immediately come to mind.
 
2018-03-08 06:55:30 PM  
You just automate it. Belts, robots, drills. Maybe not in that order. But that's how Factorio does it.
 
2018-03-08 08:03:09 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-08 08:40:32 PM  
I thought Steve Buscemi was the brains of that operation.
 
2018-03-08 09:35:25 PM  
I'm seeing comments about splashdown and such.  Wouldn't it be more useful to have it already outside of a planet's gravity well?  Considering the fuel costs to get things back up there?

/DNRTFA
 
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