Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Eat Sip Trip)   Despite what trendy diets are telling you not all probiotics are good for your gut health   ( eatsiptrip.10best.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Probiotic, beneficial probiotic bacteria, probiotic foods, Gut flora, Lactobacillus, new probiotic foods, Leuconostoc Cremoris bacteria, prominent probiotic player  
•       •       •

1343 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Mar 2018 at 9:15 PM (32 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-03-07 04:01:48 PM  
My philosophy has been that a person gets what they need from consuming everyday foods.
 
2018-03-07 05:08:10 PM  

Merltech: My philosophy has been that a person gets what they need from consuming everyday foods.


Having tried probiotics, I can attest they have a beneficial impact on my overall energy levels. I make a cost effective version of lemon + cayenne Kevita at home using powder from gel caps bought at GNC that works just as well as the $3.50/bottle stuff at the store and I eat a pretty damned healthy diet of stuff made from scratch
 
2018-03-07 08:11:26 PM  
All I know is that I tried this one weird trick and I was able to make $4500/month letting Obama erase my mortgages! Click here to found out how you can too!
 
2018-03-07 08:19:05 PM  
I've always been suspicious of the probiotic trend.

Scientists/doctors: "The gut biome is incredibly complex and incredibly important. Everyone has their own unique blend of thousands of different kinds of bacteria that work together to impact a person's health."

Yogurt company: "Eat our yogurt with one strain of bacteria and your gut biome will be as healthy as it can be!"
 
2018-03-07 09:35:22 PM  
Those are expensive. I prefer amateur biotics.
 
2018-03-07 09:39:16 PM  
I use a reputable brand when I start to feel like I'm coming down with an illness. Also good after having to use antibiotics. Otherwise I don't take them.
 
2018-03-07 09:43:02 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


Just a friendly reminder of which way the poop goes.
 
2018-03-07 09:43:59 PM  
But they have the word "pro" right in them!
 
2018-03-07 10:10:31 PM  

wxboy: But they have the word "pro" right in them!


Congress is the opposite of progress, amirite? But I digress.
 
2018-03-07 10:21:49 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Works just fine.
 
2018-03-07 10:23:41 PM  
"Does she know she's an ad?  DOES SHE KNOW SHE'S AN AD??!!!"
 
2018-03-07 10:26:42 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-07 10:30:39 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-07 10:37:03 PM  

beezeltown: All I know is that I tried this one weird trick and I was able to make $4500/month letting Obama erase my mortgages! Click here to found out how you can too!


Sir, I would like to subscribe to your bullshiat
 
2018-03-07 11:01:01 PM  
So this jar of pickle-scented tea rotting on my counter might not be good for me?
 
2018-03-07 11:37:28 PM  

SoupGuru: I've always been suspicious of the probiotic trend.

Scientists/doctors: "The gut biome is incredibly complex and incredibly important. Everyone has their own unique blend of thousands of different kinds of bacteria that work together to impact a person's health."

Yogurt company: "Eat our yogurt with one strain of bacteria and your gut biome will be as healthy as it can be!"


Even better: "take these tablets that have been sitting on a store shelf for god knows how long"
 
2018-03-07 11:46:27 PM  
Or you could just, you know, buy, or even - deep breath - make, yes, MAKE some delicious sauerkraut or kimchi. It's not rocket surgery.
 
2018-03-07 11:55:06 PM  
Some yogurt may only have one strain of bacteria used. I think the most I've seen is 5 or 6. Commercial kefir usually has 10-15 strains of bacteria and yeast, but if you make it from kefir grains, it may have more than 40. There are probably some strains that are in both, and some that are on only one or the other. Kombucha has other strains, and fermented vegetables (like real sauerkraut, kimchi, etc) have others. If you want to get creative, you can get into things like miso, tempeh, natto.

When you eat those foods, a lot of the bacteria and yeast die in the stomach. If a few make it to the intestines, they can reproduce, but only if there's food for them to eat. Their main food is fiber, and most Americans get about half the fiber we should. If we eat and drink things that are full of probiotics and/or take probiotic supplements, but we don't provide food for them, they're not going to survive, anyway.

There is also plenty of good bacteria in the air.

If we have a good diet and eat plenty of food that the probiotics thrive on, then even if only a few made it to the intestines, they'll multiply.

I think that part of the problem with our gut biomes traces back to the fear of bacteria and dirt that made us start washing all of our vegetables and fruits (probably a good idea now to get rid of pesticides) and also to start peeling everything. Peeling fruits and vegetables removes some of the fiber (in some cases most of it) as well as the symbiotic bacteria that may have lived on the surface.

If you already have a healthy gut and you haven't had any recent antibiotic regimens, you probably don't need any probiotics. If you don't have a healthy gut and you're not eating an otherwise healthy diet, I don't think probiotics will help much. If you're willing to feed your gut biota, adding some probiotics to your diet probably won't hurt.
 
2018-03-08 01:31:31 AM  

Gotfire: [img.fark.net image 425x340]


Vat da faaaaaaaaak?
 
2018-03-08 01:35:38 AM  
Eat pickles every day.

/Means more than that pasturized Vlassic stuff
 
2018-03-08 01:44:54 AM  
Remember, folks - the people who make Activia have no idea how it works. No, really. That link goes to the study they used to tout which basically says, "we've observed that it slightly shortens transit time, but we don't know why it does so." (Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 is the trademark name for the bacteria in Activia.) As a result, the FTC slapped the shiat out of Dannon for their unsubstantiated claims.

I've posted about probiotics before, and the thing that amazes me is how willing people are to ingest largely unknown organisms for no reason other than "someone on the teevee said it'll help." As long as it's marketed as a dietary supplement and doesn't make specific health claims, the FDA bows out of the farking discussion:

Many probiotics are sold as dietary supplements, which do not require FDA approval before they are marketed. Dietary supplement labels may make claims about how the product affects the structure or function of the body without FDA approval, but they cannot make health claims (claims that the product reduces the risk of a disease) without the FDA's consent.

The primary focus of probiotics products, apparently, is to ensure you have to buy more probiotics products - the fun part about Activia, for example, is that it both replaces quite a bit of your intestinal flora (that's how it works, after all) and doesn't stay alive very well. That's why you have to keep eating Activia three times a goddamned day to see any benefit at all - they're forced to admit that as part of their FTC settlement:

Dannon may not claim that Activia yogurt will relieve temporary irregularity or help with slow intestinal transit time, unless the claim is not misleading and the ad conveys that three servings of Activia yogurt must be eaten each day to obtain these benefits. Dannon may claim that eating fewer than three servings a day provides these benefits only if the company is relying on two well-designed human clinical studies substantiating that the claim is true.

In short, trusting probiotics right now is risky, because it's a veritable Wild West - take anything you see or hear with about a pound of salt when it comes to probiotics products.
 
2018-03-08 03:18:09 AM  

FormlessOne: In short, trusting probiotics right now is risky, because it's a veritable Wild West - take anything you see or hear with about a pound of salt when it comes to probiotics products.


Or, you know, you could make your own, which is cheap and has been proven beneficial by thousands of years of human experience.

It's actually true that not a lot of "probiotic" bacteria and other organisms survive the passage through the stomach.  But the thing to keep in mind is that there are other benefits to these kinds of food besides their biotic load.  For example, the kinds of food that support these organisms in the jar of sauerkraut or kimchi or kefir also support gut biota when these foods reach your intestines.  Also, these foods are in some respects partially pre-digested and therefore easier on your system.  Another reason for eating this stuff is that there are various substances generated by the organisms that are good for you-- certain enzymes, for example.

But the best reason is that this stuff is delicious.  Lacto-fermented pickles are just better tasting than most vegetables pickled in vinegar.  The flavors are richer and more complex, and can be tailored to your own personal tastes, simply by varying the length of time you leave your pickles to ripen.

Some are incredibly easy to make.  For example, we make kefir from whole organic milk.  You put a little commercial (but good) kefir in a jar, add milk, and let it sit on the counter for a couple days and it's done.  I like to add a little maple syrup and vanilla, to make a drink that's tremendously better than any of the flavored kefirs you can get at the grocery store, and a lot cheaper.

If you're interested, Sandor Katz has some good books and videos out-- lots of videos on Youtube.  It can really make a difference to your health and to the variety and interest of your diet.
 
2018-03-08 04:13:48 AM  

knobmaker: this stuff is delicious


You're not wrong. I started with a standard "chop cabbage, immerse in brine, wait 3 days" and moved on to kimchi with red cabbage, garlic, chilli, carrot, spring onions, etc. That stuff is great.

BTW, what's your take on inoculating a new batch with some brine from an old batch? I've heard arguments for and against, i.e. "go for it -  it speeds up fermentation", to "don't do it, you need fresh bacteria every time" - that sounds like BS to me, although I've seen some graphs of spikes in the population of various species during fermentation that *may* have a bearing on things.

Anyway, kimchi rules!
 
2018-03-08 07:53:48 AM  
I'm sure that only the good bacteria grows in water and left over veggies and fruit in your home and that this will in no way will cause problems with bad bacteria.

I'm all for home probiotic use and cultivation if you know what you are doing. That stuff gets expensive for what it is in the stores.
I'm against mommy blogs passing off half-assed incomplete ideas that lack real info.
 
2018-03-08 09:04:49 AM  
My anecdotal observations:

Probiotics are a half step removed from homeopathic "natural" remedies. They're weak and ineffectual and this is an area of medicine that isn't well understood.

You'll see claims that a particular supplement has 5 billion or 20 billion or 40 billion active cultures. You know why? Because most don't survive the trip. They die in the no man's land acid bath in your stomach. The ones that have some protective pill casing to prevent that are one step ahead of the game.

If you're going to take them make sure they aren't expired. You don't want stuff that's been sitting on the shelf for god knows how long and most of the bacteria is dead and inert.

Which probiotics should you use? F*ck if they know. They're just throwing stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks.

They're not going to cure C-Diff or Irritable Bowel or antibiotic associated diarrhea. If it's C-Diff go see a doctor. Have fun crapping in a jar for the lab test! If it's IBS related or brought on by taking antibiotics you're probably better off trying a fecal transplant if it doesn't clear up on it's own. Make sure it's from a) someone healthy and b) not fat.

Culturelle, TruBiotics, and Florastor seemed to have some marginal impact in treating the IBS I suffered that was caused by taking antibiotics but ultimately did very little in abating the symptoms and it certainly wasn't a cure. I started taking them months after the fact when it became apparent it wasn't going away anytime soon. I tried them all. It *might* help to take probiotics during and for 2-4 weeks after completing a course of antibiotics. That's the only time I'd actually take probiotics at this point and that's more a Hail Mary prayer than expecting it to actually work. Beats the alternative(which in my case was 2 years of IBS).

As others mentioned, the bacterial organisms in probiotics need something to eat. Avoid sugar. Eat moar fiber.

Really though you don't need to waste money on probiotics. Just eat better in the first place and your gut will take care of itself(barring any serious medical issues). If it is a serious medical issue go see a doc.
 
2018-03-08 09:54:30 AM  

Smoking GNU: Gotfire: [img.fark.net image 425x340]

Vat da faaaaaaaaak?


I'm picking up a distinct "Gorgor" vibe, but it's hard to say for sure...

I once managed a truck stop where some random asshole made it a point to be a repeat-offender shiat smearer on the walls and doors of the bathroom. I was there for months and we never caught the farker but I swore to God if we did he wasn't leaving on anything less than a stretcher. Saw it happen on an oil rig too, and those guys were far less forgiving. Humans are basically just disgusting animals with a thin veneer of civilization covering them and it really doesn't seem to take much to reveal the inner illness.
 
2018-03-08 09:58:13 AM  

MechaPyx: Which probiotics should you use? F*ck if they know. They're just throwing stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks.


Just to add to that - if you do have health problems, you may want to avoid, not embrace, probiotics. When you take probiotics, you're ingesting a bacterial starter culture that the manufacturers themselves often aren't sure how or even if it worksl. If you can't fight off a bacterial infection, don't farking take probiotics.
That's straight from the NIH:

Whether probiotics are likely to be safe for you depends on the state of your health.- In people who are generally healthy, probiotics have a good safety record. Side effects, if they occur at all, usually consist only of mild digestive symptoms such as gas.
- On the other hand, there have been reports linking probiotics to severe side effects, such as dangerous infections, in people with serious underlying medical problems. The people who are most at risk of severe side effects include critically ill patients, those who have had surgery, very sick infants, and people with weakened immune systemsEven for healthy people, there are uncertainties about the safety of probiotics. Because many research studies on probiotics haven't looked closely at safety, there isn't enough information right now to answer some safety questions. Most of our knowledge about safety comes from studies of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium; less is known about other probiotics. Information on the long-term safety of probiotics is limited, and safety may differ from one type of probiotic to another. For example, even though a National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)-funded study showed that a particular kind of Lactobacillus appears safe in healthy adults age 65 and older, this does not mean that all probiotics would necessarily be safe for people in this age group.
Probiotics manufacturers are actually pressing the "I Believe" button - "well, we know enough about these strains of Bifdobacterium to know it won't cause harm, so I believe this new strain won't cause harm" - with little actual testing before they go to market. You are as much guinea pig as consumer when it comes to this stuff, so if you're going to take it, at least try to ensure that you're fit & healthy first.
 
2018-03-08 09:58:39 AM  
...friggin' Fark formatting...
 
2018-03-08 11:04:13 AM  

FormlessOne: MechaPyx: Which probiotics should you use? F*ck if they know. They're just throwing stuff at the wall and seeing what sticks.

Just to add to that - if you do have health problems, you may want to avoid, not embrace, probiotics. When you take probiotics, you're ingesting a bacterial starter culture that the manufacturers themselves often aren't sure how or even if it worksl. If you can't fight off a bacterial infection, don't farking take probiotics.
That's straight from the NIH:

Whether probiotics are likely to be safe for you depends on the state of your health.- In people who are generally healthy, probiotics have a good safety record. Side effects, if they occur at all, usually consist only of mild digestive symptoms such as gas.
- On the other hand, there have been reports linking probiotics to severe side effects, such as dangerous infections, in people with serious underlying medical problems. The people who are most at risk of severe side effects include critically ill patients, those who have had surgery, very sick infants, and people with weakened immune systemsEven for healthy people, there are uncertainties about the safety of probiotics. Because many research studies on probiotics haven't looked closely at safety, there isn't enough information right now to answer some safety questions. Most of our knowledge about safety comes from studies of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium; less is known about other probiotics. Information on the long-term safety of probiotics is limited, and safety may differ from one type of probiotic to another. For example, even though a National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)-funded study showed that a particular kind of Lactobacillus appears safe in healthy adults age 65 and older, this does not mean that all probiotics would necessarily be safe for people in this age group.Probiotics manufacturers are actually pressing the "I Believe" button - "well, we know enough about these strains of Bifdobacterium to know it won't cause harm, so I believe this new strain won't cause harm" - with little actual testing before they go to market. You are as much guinea pig as consumer when it comes to this stuff, so if you're going to take it, at least try to ensure that you're fit & healthy first.


You know your shiat
 
2018-03-08 11:48:56 AM  

Fano: You know your shiat


"At Uranus, things come out a little differently..."
 
2018-03-08 03:04:38 PM  

Fano: You know your shiat


No, he doesn't.  This is weak sauce from the NIH, who also does not know their shiat.  If you want to hear from someone who does know their shiat:

https://food52.com/blog/19520-what-sa​n​dor-katz-wants-you-to-understand-about​-fermentation

Of course, fermented foods are not panaceas.  Anyone who tells you that is an idiot.  But anyone who tells you you're going to get sick and die from home-made sauerkraut is also an idiot.  People have been eating fermented stuff for tens of thousands of years.
 
2018-03-08 03:12:34 PM  

knobmaker: Fano: You know your shiat

No, he doesn't.  This is weak sauce from the NIH, who also does not know their shiat.  If you want to hear from someone who does know their shiat:

https://food52.com/blog/19520-what-san​dor-katz-wants-you-to-understand-about​-fermentation

Of course, fermented foods are not panaceas.  Anyone who tells you that is an idiot.  But anyone who tells you you're going to get sick and die from home-made sauerkraut is also an idiot.  People have been eating fermented stuff for tens of thousands of years.


imgflip.comView Full Size
people been dying for tens of thousands of years too
 
Displayed 32 of 32 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report