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(Bloomberg)   Blackberry goes all patent troll on facebook because it's really got nothing left to lose at this point   ( bloomberg.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Facebook, BlackBerry, Nokia, Innovation, Facebook Inc., Smartphone, Google, Chief executive officer  
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726 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Mar 2018 at 11:50 AM (32 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-03-07 08:36:59 AM  
If you've ever been to the Blackberry head office in Waterloo, you'll know they take their patents extremely seriously. Their major patents are all displayed in the main lobby. On bronze plaques.

But, the computer scientist in me feel software or feature patents are not valid. The novel techniques and technologies that produce the features are what needs to be patented. But, that's not what the companies that lobbied the USPO had in mind.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2018-03-07 10:11:16 AM  
Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."
 
2018-03-07 11:35:48 AM  

ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."


Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.

This is the very definition of patent trolling and I'm pretty damned sure they are hoping Facebook or one of the other Defendants simply opts to buy them for their Patent Portfolio. Because that's all they have left. RIM is the walking dead and they know it
 
2018-03-07 12:33:49 PM  

rcain: ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."

Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.

This is the very definition of patent trolling and I'm pretty damned sure they are hoping Facebook or one of the other Defendants simply opts to buy them for their Patent Portfolio. Because that's all they have left. RIM is the walking dead and they know it


Messaging apps were very revolutionary when they came out over 10 years ago.

If Microsoft had thought of it back in the early '00s we might all be running Windows Mobile.
 
2018-03-07 12:40:38 PM  

HempHead: rcain: ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."

Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.

This is the very definition of patent trolling and I'm pretty damned sure they are hoping Facebook or one of the other Defendants simply opts to buy them for their Patent Portfolio. Because that's all they have left. RIM is the walking dead and they know it

Messaging apps were very revolutionary when they came out over 10 years ago.

If Microsoft had thought of it back in the early '00s we might all be running Windows Mobile.


It's just another form of electronic messaging. I was doing chat via IRC back in the 90s, and ICQ and other messaging apps existed well before RIMs Blackberry was around

Like I said, they don't plan to win this. They just want to get bought for their Patent Portfolio and let their remaining investors cash out while there's enough value still left
 
2018-03-07 12:41:46 PM  

rcain: ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."

Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.

This is the very definition of patent trolling and I'm pretty damned sure they are hoping Facebook or one of the other Defendants simply opts to buy them for their Patent Portfolio. Because that's all they have left. RIM is the walking dead and they know it


The place I work uses BlackBerry apps for our phones. Keeps the work related items in its own encrypted space separate from your other phone stuff, works well as far as I can tell. Fair size company, and not the only one that uses it. They need to completely give up on hardware, but they're evidently not quite ready for the cart yet.
 
2018-03-07 12:45:04 PM  

rcain: It's just another form of electronic messaging. I was doing chat via IRC back in the 90s, and ICQ and other messaging apps existed well before RIMs Blackberry was around


None of those are/were secure encrypted chat, which is what I'd assume their patents are for.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2018-03-07 12:59:17 PM  
The patents are listed here: https://seekingalpha.com/article/4154​0​84-blackberry-v-facebook-patent-battle​. They may be obvious, but they aren't patents on the concept of sending a message to a phone.
 
2018-03-07 01:00:36 PM  

miscreant: The place I work uses BlackBerry apps for our phones. Keeps the work related items in its own encrypted space separate from your other phone stuff, works well as far as I can tell. Fair size company, and not the only one that uses it. They need to completely give up on hardware, but they're evidently not quite ready for the cart yet.


I loved their mechanical keyboard. I wish all phones had them. Touch screen typing is garbage.
 
2018-03-07 01:11:13 PM  

Ishkur: miscreant: The place I work uses BlackBerry apps for our phones. Keeps the work related items in its own encrypted space separate from your other phone stuff, works well as far as I can tell. Fair size company, and not the only one that uses it. They need to completely give up on hardware, but they're evidently not quite ready for the cart yet.

I loved their mechanical keyboard. I wish all phones had them. Touch screen typing is garbage.


I totally agree, I miss that keyboard.
 
2018-03-07 01:29:56 PM  

Chak: Ishkur: miscreant: The place I work uses BlackBerry apps for our phones. Keeps the work related items in its own encrypted space separate from your other phone stuff, works well as far as I can tell. Fair size company, and not the only one that uses it. They need to completely give up on hardware, but they're evidently not quite ready for the cart yet.

I loved their mechanical keyboard. I wish all phones had them. Touch screen typing is garbage.

I totally agree, I miss that keyboard.


I would love a BlackBerry again, the keyboard was awesome, but everything went downhill fast.
 
2018-03-07 02:06:56 PM  
98kupd.comView Full Size


/I'll just leave this here
 
2018-03-07 02:26:51 PM  
I had thought Blackberry had died a merciful death years ago. I thought that up until last year when my company's IT department sent out an email that in the first line said they were going to be transitioning away from "Good" the shiatty corporate mobile email app that worked like shiat. "Hooray!" I said, reading that, knowing that nothing could be worse than Good.

But it turned out in the second line of the email that Blackberry bought Good and now retooled it as "Work" and "Access." "Oh,  shiat," I said. There is something worse.

And indeed it is. It's everything that was terrible about Good melded with everything awful about Blackberry--just a hot mess of nonfunctional stuff that occasionally manages to send or receive an email.
 
2018-03-07 02:50:34 PM  
No RIMjob references in the headline? Fark I am dissapoint.
 
2018-03-07 02:51:47 PM  

Chak: Ishkur: miscreant: The place I work uses BlackBerry apps for our phones. Keeps the work related items in its own encrypted space separate from your other phone stuff, works well as far as I can tell. Fair size company, and not the only one that uses it. They need to completely give up on hardware, but they're evidently not quite ready for the cart yet.

I loved their mechanical keyboard. I wish all phones had them. Touch screen typing is garbage.

I totally agree, I miss that keyboard.


To be fair:  the onscreen keyboard on iPhones is close, but only in the last couple releases of iOS, and
even then it is still inferior.

The other thing I miss about older blackberries (I think it was the 7250) was the sidewheel.  It was the
only handheld device that you could easily browse and control with one hand (assuming you were
right handed, anyway).  Yes, there was a bit of a learning curbe to figure out how the onscreen cursor
flowed along, but once you got it down you didn't need two hands and browsing emails or online content
was way more intuitive and quick than any touch screen device has ever been for me.

I completely believe that the beginning of the end for them was abandoning the sidewheel for that silly
center of mass trackball.
 
2018-03-07 08:59:36 PM  
Are they also going after chat functions of dial up bulletin board services, just to see if claims of time travel work in the courtroom?
 
2018-03-07 09:10:41 PM  

rcain: ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."

Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.

This is the very definition of patent trolling and I'm pretty damned sure they are hoping Facebook or one of the other Defendants simply opts to buy them for their Patent Portfolio. Because that's all they have left. RIM is the walking dead and they know it


It makes my heart sink just a little when a technology that was once part of our lives is attached to a company that today has gone to the dark side.
(I'm looking at you, Worlds Inc)
 
2018-03-07 11:36:31 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I had thought Blackberry had died a merciful death years ago. I thought that up until last year when my company's IT department sent out an email that in the first line said they were going to be transitioning away from "Good" the shiatty corporate mobile email app that worked like shiat. "Hooray!" I said, reading that, knowing that nothing could be worse than Good.

But it turned out in the second line of the email that Blackberry bought Good and now retooled it as "Work" and "Access." "Oh,  shiat," I said. There is something worse.

And indeed it is. It's everything that was terrible about Good melded with everything awful about Blackberry--just a hot mess of nonfunctional stuff that occasionally manages to send or receive an email.


"Good" was farking awful. What a piece of crap.

/Gmail for work ftw
 
2018-03-08 01:41:40 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: But, the computer scientist in me feel software or feature patents are not valid. The novel techniques and technologies that produce the features are what needs to be patented.


What if those novel techniques and technologies are implemented in software?
Or, looked at another way, why should a software algorithm be unpatentable, but the same exact algorithm implemented in an ASIC or FPGA be patentable?
 
2018-03-08 01:46:31 AM  

rcain: ZAZ: Blackberry actually invented stuff and used its patents in its products. They aren't patent trolls by any definition narrower than "patent holders I don't like."

Dude -- they are claiming a patent on "messaging features". Not at all novel, hardly innovation and I'm pretty damned sure a case for prior art can be made with other forms of electronic communication, primarily in multiplayer games and apps like ICQ.


They're really not claiming that at all. They're claiming patents on several specific technologies, some of which are used in messaging apps. They're not claiming that they invented "messaging" itself. Specifically, the patents are:
U.S. Patent No. 7,372,961 ("the '961 patent"), entitled "Method of public key generation."
U.S. Patent No. 8,279,173 ("the '173 patent"), entitled "User interface for selecting a photo tag."
U.S. Patent No. 8,209,634 ("the '634 patent"), entitled "Previewing a new event on a small screen device."
U.S. Patent No. 8,301,713 ("the '713 patent"), entitled "Handheld electronic device and associated method providing time data in a messaging environment."
U.S. Patent No. 8,429,236 ("the '236 patent"), entitled "Transmission of status updates responsive to status of recipient application."
U.S. Patent No. 8,677,250 ("the '250 patent"), entitled "System and method for switching between an instant messaging conversation and a game in progress."
U.S. Patent No. 9,349,120 ("the '120 patent"), entitled "System and method for silencing notifications for a message thread."

Now, I don't know whether these are valid or not and haven't looked into them. But it's important to remember, the only part of a patent that has any legal weight is the claims. Not the abstract, not the title, not the background, and certainly not the one-word summary that some random journalist uses in describing them as being about "messaging".
 
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