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(Phys Org2)   Scientists developed a material for the new type of liquid crystal displays, meaning prettier TV, phone, and monitor colors. Still no cure for cancer   ( phys.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Liquid crystal display, liquid crystal, polarization plane, field sequential color, liquid crystal pixel, linear polarization, electric field, nematic liquid crystals  
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1109 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Mar 2018 at 1:20 PM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-03-07 10:21:58 AM  
But the detail on the tumor pictures is outstanding.
 
2018-03-07 10:37:40 AM  
About that subby

Inching closer.
 
2018-03-07 01:35:48 PM  
The return of field-sequential TV?
 
2018-03-07 01:42:49 PM  
Yeah, except... I learned about OLED's on TechTV's Screensavers... and we're only now seeing them at a price regular people can afford. So... I'm not holding my breath.
 
2018-03-07 02:33:57 PM  

Diogenes: But the detail on the tumor pictures is outstanding.


Not if your hospital is unwilling to pitch for good bandwidth it's not. Tomography res can suffer terribly with low bandwidth.
 
2018-03-07 02:49:15 PM  
bought a new tv for the first time in about a decade - the 4k is really an amazing picture (or my old tv was really just getting old and shiatty)

and they are getting crazy cheap - this new 42"  4k was $385 right after xmas

our old shiatty tv, when we bought it brand new in '07 was almost $700

/they 'dynamic' setting on the 4k is a little crazy looking... like everything looks like a bad old soap opera, but in hi-def
/messed with the setttings to adjust that & it's way better
/games & movies i've seen or played already look so different, it's like seeing them for the first time
 
2018-03-07 03:46:53 PM  
Ugh. Field-sequential color is terrible. Nothing helps you maintain your focus like seeing vibrant red/green/blue rainbows on sharp bright edges every time your eyes saccade (protip: your eyes are saccading all the time, because if they don't, you stop seeing).

I don't think the 500Hz field rate (166Hz frame rate) is nearly high enough to get rid of this issue, although it would surely be better than the 90 or 180Hz in the field-sequential displays I've had to use. I also wonder about the power-budget implications of schlepping an entire display worth of pixels 500 times per second. Even if it's locally buffered at the display, that's a whole lot of switching and line-driving -- unless they've got a few dozen bits of memory at each pixel, which has its own implications for aperture ratio (and thus brightness and efficiency) and manufacturability.
 
2018-03-07 05:14:19 PM  
I've tested that with my trusty $18k monster cable set and found pron 13.5772% more fappable 😀
 
2018-03-07 10:21:50 PM  
As I have pointed out to you before, Subby, I don't want the liquid crystal display dorks sciencing up against cancer, for the same reasons why I don't want the toilet dorks sciencing up against poor bandwidth on wi-fi.

Dorks gotta dork where they know how to dork.
 
2018-03-08 01:34:50 AM  

jfarkinB: Ugh. Field-sequential color is terrible. Nothing helps you maintain your focus like seeing vibrant red/green/blue rainbows on sharp bright edges every time your eyes saccade (protip: your eyes are saccading all the time, because if they don't, you stop seeing).

I don't think the 500Hz field rate (166Hz frame rate) is nearly high enough to get rid of this issue, although it would surely be better than the 90 or 180Hz in the field-sequential displays I've had to use. I also wonder about the power-budget implications of schlepping an entire display worth of pixels 500 times per second. Even if it's locally buffered at the display, that's a whole lot of switching and line-driving -- unless they've got a few dozen bits of memory at each pixel, which has its own implications for aperture ratio (and thus brightness and efficiency) and manufacturability.


If I recall, LCD's only need potential switched above and below a ground state ground state to an average value of zero. There are circuits that will do this and take almost no power per segment/pixel, so we are just looking at running the signal switching and clock sync.

Here is an example of one of these circuits that uses a inverter to handle generate the square wave to drive the LCD:
https://youtu.be/ZP0KxZl5N2o?t=688
 
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