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(Abc.net.au)   Were we wrong to give up the landline? LOL. Really, you have to ask?   ( abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Amusing, Activism, phone, phone calls, people, important phone calls, landline phone, activist groups, social media  
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917 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 05 Mar 2018 at 6:24 AM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-03-05 06:44:26 AM  
CSB

We have kept our landline because we run a very small business out of the house and didn't want our cell numbers to be all over the Googles.  It's a damn burden to be honest.  The phone never stops ringing with telemarketing calls at a faster pace than we can attempt to block the numbers.  Through in the bonus of the caller i.d. switcheroo showing our local area codes (potential customers - so we answer) and I am just about done with it.  It's also a hellscape during the fall because of elections.

I hate it.

CSB
 
2018-03-05 06:45:51 AM  
To be as succinct as possible:  Facilities phone lines (land lines) are using an antiquated infrastructure fewer telecoms bother spending money to maintenance.  It's already on the verge of falling apart.  Get Nanno on a softswitch line sooner rather than later.

Also, author is some kinda dummy.
 
2018-03-05 06:51:21 AM  

Earl Green: CSB

We have kept our landline because we run a very small business out of the house and didn't want our cell numbers to be all over the Googles.  It's a damn burden to be honest.  The phone never stops ringing with telemarketing calls at a faster pace than we can attempt to block the numbers.  Through in the bonus of the caller i.d. switcheroo showing our local area codes (potential customers - so we answer) and I am just about done with it.  It's also a hellscape during the fall because of elections.

I hate it.

CSB


The thing is, even if you ditch the landline and go exclusively to cell you won't get away from the telemarketer BS.
The shiat needs to be dealt with, but we all know the chances of that happening.
 
2018-03-05 07:07:40 AM  
No.
 
2018-03-05 07:12:28 AM  

Unoriginal_Username: Earl Green: CSB

We have kept our landline because we run a very small business out of the house and didn't want our cell numbers to be all over the Googles.  It's a damn burden to be honest.  The phone never stops ringing with telemarketing calls at a faster pace than we can attempt to block the numbers.  Through in the bonus of the caller i.d. switcheroo showing our local area codes (potential customers - so we answer) and I am just about done with it.  It's also a hellscape during the fall because of elections.

I hate it.

CSB

The thing is, even if you ditch the landline and go exclusively to cell you won't get away from the telemarketer BS.
The shiat needs to be dealt with, but we all know the chances of that happening.


That's because of the lovely robo-callers.  Most of them out of some far off land that you can't even pronounce. I have more numbers blocked on my phone than I do actual legit numbers. They DO have the technology to combat this, but that would cost money and so forth.
 
2018-03-05 07:20:54 AM  
Thank God we can block numbers on cell phones. It doesn't stop the spam calls entirely but it keeps a trickle from becoming a flood.
 
2018-03-05 07:33:52 AM  
I have a landline I use like a spam folder. Anyone that requires a phone number for something but that I don't entirely trust gets the landline. The landline number blocks all but a handful of numbers that I allow through.
 
2018-03-05 07:52:34 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-05 07:56:02 AM  
I gave up a traditional landline about a decade ago in favor of VOIP at home (cellular service kind of sucks where I am). I probably would have been willing to keep the landline, but it was an overpriced annoyance and not worth the theoretical redundancy in case of power outage.  Telephone solicitation was ridiculous, even with the do-not-call list (it didn't help due to political and charity calls, plus there were plenty of commercial solicitations that ignored it anyway). But what annoyed me the most was the concept of "local" and "long-distance" calling. If I needed to call someone two+ towns away, I was going to be charged extra? Whereas on VOIP or a cell phone I can call anywhere in the country?  Why would I do that?

Landlines had their place, just like buggy whips. And you know what? There are people who still use buggy whips, and that's fine, but no one should question whether it was wrong for most of us to give them up.
 
2018-03-05 08:01:27 AM  
You can't be "wrong" for something that was inevitable. It's been said that if the universe is truly infinite, then anything that can happen will happen. So there's that.
 
2018-03-05 08:15:04 AM  

Merltech: That's because of the lovely robo-callers.  Most of them out of some far off land that you can't even pronounce. I have more numbers blocked on my phone than I do actual legit numbers. They DO have the technology to combat this, but that would cost money and so forth.


It's getting so bad for some people, that it almost makes sense to just whitelist numbers that you do want to accept calls from, and automatically block everything else, but obviously that has its own problems.
 
2018-03-05 08:23:36 AM  
Day 4 no power.  I have no relevant point related to the topic, just wanted to stop in and say fark everything.
 
2018-03-05 08:25:27 AM  
My 'land line' phone has been ported to a 'bring your own device' voice over IP service.

Once upon a time the land line was important because it was completely independent from your otherhome's services.  If a hurricane knocked out the power, and the landline was not knock down too, you could still call.  VoIP is more fragile. If your internet goes down, because power or whatever was carrying it, the phone goes away.  So does 911

So now the cell phones become the primary 911 provider of last resort, and the VoIP is just there for tradition.

My bring your own device company actually has a pretty good web page where you can block numers.  You can even set it to answer the call with a message to frustrate robodialers, making them send another random number to go through.  The phone log even rates the past calls as how likely to be spam.

My black list works pretty well.  The main pests are the centrial asians pretending to be 'Windows Tech Support", and even that is down to about one call a month.   I get more crap calls on my cell

I can also get new numbers for other phones in the house on the same account.  Free ones, if I don't mind a New York state area code.   Telemarketers are not the only ones who can have throw away DIDs

I pay more for a flat rate plan, just becuase.   But you can probably get it down to about $10/mo to keep your old number.  Maybe less
 
2018-03-05 08:57:51 AM  
We have to have a landline at our house, as our only ISP is the local telephone cooperative.  Part of the contract requires us to also have telephone service.  We don't even have a phone hooked up though, so we don't get phone calls on it.
 
2018-03-05 09:07:10 AM  
i have an ooma line that both my wife's and my cell phone #s forward to using google voice. it's just convenient to be able to use real handsets while at home instead of the cell. ooma's "free" ($4/mo in telecom taxes) and the box was relatively cheap at costco.
 
2018-03-05 09:09:01 AM  
I do miss the voice clarity of POTS
 
2018-03-05 09:15:03 AM  

Tax Boy: i have an ooma line that both my wife's and my cell phone #s forward to using google voice. it's just convenient to be able to use real handsets while at home instead of the cell. ooma's "free" ($4/mo in telecom taxes) and the box was relatively cheap at costco.


As long as you don't mind Google having even more personal info on you, that works quite well.

/I use Google Voice
//Google knows more about me than I do
///It was fine until it started criticizing me for being too boring...
 
2018-03-05 09:15:39 AM  
The fax machine helped change things. Deforestation included.
 
2018-03-05 09:15:51 AM  
I have a Rick Astley relationship with my landline. Cell reception isn't universal
 
2018-03-05 09:23:38 AM  

pyrotek85: Merltech: That's because of the lovely robo-callers.  Most of them out of some far off land that you can't even pronounce. I have more numbers blocked on my phone than I do actual legit numbers. They DO have the technology to combat this, but that would cost money and so forth.

It's getting so bad for some people, that it almost makes sense to just whitelist numbers that you do want to accept calls from, and automatically block everything else, but obviously that has its own problems.


Almost like a pop-up blocker for phones.
 
2018-03-05 09:51:31 AM  
We gave up the landline until they day a crackhead tried to break into my house in Canton and both of our cell phones were in my wife's car in Akron, and I had to defend* myself and my two toddlers with a sledgehammer, 'cause I didn't have a way to call the cops**.

*Stayed in the house by my front door until he decided to leave rather than attempt to re-enter the house.

**turns out that you can call 911 on a regular land phone as long as you gave a phone jack, even if you don't have "service."

I have one now, the ringer is turned off.  Nobody knows the number, but if I have to make a local call (911, in-laws, stuff like that) and my kids have run my phone out of juice because they had a good run on Candy Crush, I'm still good.
 
2018-03-05 09:52:09 AM  
I know some people that keep their landline for emergency purposes, like using 911.
 
2018-03-05 10:04:22 AM  
Still have a landline, but it is part of my cable service.. copper in this area has degraded badly, and Verizon owns it all, and will not be replacing it.  The main issue is during power outages, where the cable amplifiers go dead after 8-12 hours and I lose everything but the cell phone, and some of the towers shut down on extended outages..  got power at the house via generator.  Could do without the LL, but it is convenient to have and saves on cell minutes.
 
2018-03-05 10:50:19 AM  

kdawg7736: I know some people that keep their landline for emergency purposes, like using 911.


*BINGO*

I've been mobile-only my entire adult life, but now that we have a little one running around, we're thinking we really should have a landline in a central location in the house. If one parent isn't home and something happens to the other, I have more confidence in a 3-5 year old knowing 9-1-1 on a landline than trying to find Mom's iPhone, unlock it, and dial from there. Running to a neighbor's house may not always be an option, especially during daytime.

Even when we're all home, we often may not have our phones handy, and it might be faster to grab a phone that's always in the kitchen than run to the bedroom and search for a phone.

I think this is an underappreciated risk in the mobile-only phone system most of us are used to.
 
2018-03-05 10:52:53 AM  

Earl Green: The phone never stops ringing with telemarketing calls


Exactly why we got rid of and do not miss the landline.
 
2018-03-05 10:58:35 AM  

pkellmey: I have a landline I use like a spam folder. Anyone that requires a phone number for something but that I don't entirely trust gets the landline


I have a google voice number for that (this is the number I give out generally).

But, google is very good at blocking spam calls, so my google voice number doesn't ever seem to get spam.

My regular number (the one I give out sparingly) gets spammed all the time due to robo-dialing (Mr. Number catches most of these, but it's not integrated well enough into the newer android versions so there is still at least 1 vibration when a call comes in, so I often mistake a call being blocked for a text message or e-mail being received).

// the really annoying repeat callers get put into the block list at my cell provider ... but they only allow 5 numbers to be blocked so I rotate the oldest one out when I need to put in a new one. With this block, the call gets a 'could not be completed' error and tone so it's the nuclear option.
 
2018-03-05 11:01:58 AM  
^ that single vibration on the phone also means that there is a single ring when I'm in the car with the phone connected via bluetooth. That single ring will interrupt whatever song is playing, or will interrupt navigation for a moment (turn at 'brrrrrrrrrrrring' street isn't a very useful instruction).

So yeah, still a regular annoyance that I can do without.
 
2018-03-05 11:07:57 AM  
My 75-year old mother started working for AT&T (and later SBC after the AT&T breakup) when she was eighteen.  She spent her whole career there and retired from there.  I think she still gets her landline for free or discounted as we did when I was growing-up.  And we had phones all over the house because they were basically free.  Hadn't thought of that in years.

/couldn't even tell you what her landline number is and she's had that number  for at least fifteen years.
 
2018-03-05 11:30:12 AM  
That reads like some kind of poorly researched POS term paper based on whatever crap came out of some over-caffeinated sleep-deprived brain.
 
2018-03-05 12:19:58 PM  
We get crummy cell service at our house, and the power is not reliable in a storm. So I still have the landline. It is too expensive. I do use it every day though. After adding the caller i.d. feature to screen the many scam calls, it has become tolerable.
 
2018-03-05 12:28:38 PM  
Gave up my landline 12 years ago and no regrets. The wife would have a cell either way, as would my older son, so it was an extraneous expense that really served no purpose. As a bonus I get almost no telemarketing calls.
 
2018-03-05 12:41:02 PM  
After spending probably over 5 hours total on the phone with Verizon (mostly on hold) to try to get my parents' land line number ported over to their new address, I think I'll never touch land lines again.

Do alarm monitoring companies still rely on POTS lines for their alarm panels, or do they have some kind of VOIP options now?
 
2018-03-05 12:44:53 PM  

OlderGuy: saves on cell minutes.


Are you on pre-paid service?  I didn't think any monthly plans still charged for minutes, just data these days.
 
2018-03-05 12:55:54 PM  

Arkanaut: After spending probably over 5 hours total on the phone with Verizon (mostly on hold) to try to get my parents' land line number ported over to their new address, I think I'll never touch land lines again.

Do alarm monitoring companies still rely on POTS lines for their alarm panels, or do they have some kind of VOIP options now?


Here in Manitoba, if the fire alarm uses the burglar alarm as a dialer, they  have to have both. I *think* if you are only burglar alarm, you can use cell only.
 
2018-03-05 05:33:34 PM  
I sort of miss my landline. For some reason I hate having to talk on a cell phone.
 
2018-03-05 05:35:02 PM  
I have VOIP now, but only because it was free with the internet plan. I unplug it. If I want to make a call I connect the plug, unplug when I'm done.

Tyrosine: As a bonus I get almost no telemarketing calls.


If only that were true. I had the same telemarketing company (one of those solar panel scams) call my cell so often I lost count. I guess they had a glitch in the computer that kept ringing my number despite the unpleasant negative results they received.
 
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