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(IFL Science)   What happens when you donate your body to science? Here comes the pickle jars   ( iflscience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, body, Donation, Human Tissue, Human Tissue Authority, Human Tissue Act, body brokers, medical institutions, proper ethical treatment  
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1396 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2018 at 9:24 PM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-03-04 05:42:20 PM  
Is being encased in lucite posed in a "help let me out" position science?

I've said it before, but I always thought it would be fun to be a coffee table.
 
2018-03-04 05:57:41 PM  
If I don't get to posthumously be part of wacky shenanigans involving being someone's unwitting remotely-puppeteered date to the Coroner's Ball, then just shove a bone up my ass and let the dogs drag me away.
 
2018-03-04 06:17:31 PM  
David Cross - When I Die
Youtube NwDP872IE5k
 
2018-03-04 07:09:17 PM  
myamericanmarket.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-04 09:16:41 PM  

iron de havilland: [myamericanmarket.com image 400x400]


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-04 09:30:22 PM  

davidphogan: Is being encased in lucite posed in a "help let me out" position science?

I've said it before, but I always thought it would be fun to be a coffee table.


I guess, as a Star Wars fan, I could go for a recreation of the Han Solo in carbonite when I die. Just hang me up on a wall and keep me relatively dust free.
 
2018-03-04 09:30:42 PM  
Your corpse gets hacked up by medical and dental students. I still remember anatomy during dental school. The bodies were pretty wrecked by the end of the semester.
I also remember my anatomy professor using a bandsaw to slice heads in half. There was usually a sandwich or beverage near by.
 
2018-03-04 09:35:15 PM  

LesserEvil: davidphogan: Is being encased in lucite posed in a "help let me out" position science?

I've said it before, but I always thought it would be fun to be a coffee table.

I guess, as a Star Wars fan, I could go for a recreation of the Han Solo in carbonite when I die. Just hang me up on a wall and keep me relatively dust free.


Leia is in for a surprise when you're thawed.
 
2018-03-04 09:49:48 PM  
A long time ago, I knew a girl who wanted to be a medical illustrator. She was majoring in art, minoring in biology. She got permission to go to the cadaver room and practice drawing, using the cadavers as models.

I "got" to help her sometimes. Yeah. Fun. She needed help raising the bodies out of the tanks, and sometimes holding up an arm or a leg so she could get the right angle. Nobody else would do it.

One night, we lifted a body out of one of the tanks, and she got a weird look and left the room suddenly.

Turned out that her great-aunt was an alumni of the university, and had donated her body to the school when she died a few weeks before.
 
2018-03-04 09:49:59 PM  
'...here COME the pickle JARS'
'...here COMES the pickle JAR'

Subby needs to be donated to pig feed. It's the only reasonable response.
 
2018-03-04 09:59:43 PM  
Hmm, the article says that you need to be in generally good health. Not always the case. When my grandfather died, he donated his body to science. He died due to a failure of the hospital during a surgery. Not to mention he had heart problems, diabetes, and a number of other issues. To say that he was not in the best health is an understatement.

Not to mention, I would imagine that studying a body that had a disease would be rather informative, if only as a training tool to show students what it does. Within reason, of course.
 
2018-03-04 10:01:18 PM  
I have made it known to my wife that I wish my brain donated to a brain bank, and the rest I care not. Let it be practice for the most inept of med students. They may marvel at my massize balls and tiny penis, accidently slice my extra kidneys in half and fail, and be cofused and how such a fat man can have such a small ass.

But you should all donate your brains to science. Because we need more brains.
 
2018-03-04 10:07:36 PM  
It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia - When I'm dead, just throw me in the trash
Youtube 0Rtu1Va-dnM
 
2018-03-04 11:07:18 PM  
Apparently there is no love for skeletons any more. Years Decades ago I got the idea that I wanted to donate my skeleton. But upon researching such options recently, no nothing.
 
2018-03-05 12:43:21 AM  
I remember listening to my ex talk about the stern lecture that her anatomy class got about respecting the bodies they were to study during their first class.  One of the students in her section later decided to disregard the rules and was summarily ejected from the course for it.  I've heard similar stories from relatives of mine who were med students at the time.
 
2018-03-05 12:51:28 AM  
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Is the data copy-protected?
 
2018-03-05 12:54:36 AM  

Kevin72: Apparently there is no love for skeletons any more. Years Decades ago I got the idea that I wanted to donate my skeleton. But upon researching such options recently, no nothing.


Skeletons today are all plastic. My anthro department had old articulated skeletons, one of unknown provenance and one that was known to be a mashup of five different individuals both male and female to fark with students. "Here, sex and age this skeleton."

The only other actual osteological material were basically bone chips in a jar, both animal and human. We had to pull one out, determine if it was human or not and if so try to determine which part of which bone it was.

Everything else was resin casts. They deliberately did not use actual human bones for anything else. And even then someone put on indianz.com that we were using a ton of human skulls for teaching and the school administration got hundreds of phone calls from angry AIM members about it, expecting they were native remains.

Human remains outside of medical or anatomy programs is avoided whenever possible. Casts are wonderful, you can have a thousand copies made of an unusual pathology for study around the world.
 
2018-03-05 03:44:46 AM  

BolloxReader: Kevin72: Apparently there is no love for skeletons any more. Years Decades ago I got the idea that I wanted to donate my skeleton. But upon researching such options recently, no nothing.

Skeletons today are all plastic. My anthro department had old articulated skeletons, one of unknown provenance and one that was known to be a mashup of five different individuals both male and female to fark with students. "Here, sex and age this skeleton."

The only other actual osteological material were basically bone chips in a jar, both animal and human. We had to pull one out, determine if it was human or not and if so try to determine which part of which bone it was.

Everything else was resin casts. They deliberately did not use actual human bones for anything else. And even then someone put on indianz.com that we were using a ton of human skulls for teaching and the school administration got hundreds of phone calls from angry AIM members about it, expecting they were native remains.

Human remains outside of medical or anatomy programs is avoided whenever possible. Casts are wonderful, you can have a thousand copies made of an unusual pathology for study around the world.


As recently as the 1970s or so you could buy skeletons pretty cheap, typically from India where it was a form of posthumous income for their family. I knew a guy at a natural history museum who had a human skeleton loose in a box. You can still buy them online but it's no longer <$100.
 
2018-03-05 04:00:12 AM  
If I donated my body to science, I'd want to be the forensic science body that gets buried and dug up at certain intervals to see the rate of decomposition under 'conditions'.
 
2018-03-05 04:16:21 AM  

cirby: A long time ago, I knew a girl who wanted to be a medical illustrator. She was majoring in art, minoring in biology. She got permission to go to the cadaver room and practice drawing, using the cadavers as models.

I "got" to help her sometimes. Yeah. Fun. She needed help raising the bodies out of the tanks, and sometimes holding up an arm or a leg so she could get the right angle. Nobody else would do it.


I held a job doing "decedent transport" for about a year.  I was the guy who, when grandma died at home at age 92, picked her up and brought her to the funeral home.  Similarly, when some guy got shot in the head, I was the guy who got the call to pick it up after the initial on-scene investigation was complete and bring it to the medical examiner.
 
2018-03-05 05:00:28 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: cirby: A long time ago, I knew a girl who wanted to be a medical illustrator. She was majoring in art, minoring in biology. She got permission to go to the cadaver room and practice drawing, using the cadavers as models.

I "got" to help her sometimes. Yeah. Fun. She needed help raising the bodies out of the tanks, and sometimes holding up an arm or a leg so she could get the right angle. Nobody else would do it.

I held a job doing "decedent transport" for about a year.  I was the guy who, when grandma died at home at age 92, picked her up and brought her to the funeral home.  Similarly, when some guy got shot in the head, I was the guy who got the call to pick it up after the initial on-scene investigation was complete and bring it to the medical examiner.


Someone on here shared a story about falling asleep in a hearse while doing that kind of work. Turns out you can't unlock them from the inside and bystanders are less than understanding...
 
2018-03-05 07:46:08 AM  
wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-05 10:41:03 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-05 11:33:04 AM  
I wont donate my body to science.

If you do, you can't be an organ donor. Helping someone keep living > Helping someone learn
 
2018-03-05 02:29:23 PM  

Publikwerks: I wont donate my body to science.

If you do, you can't be an organ donor. Helping someone keep living > Helping someone learn


What if you have a condition, which, if sufficiently studied, can save more lives than all of your tissues would?
 
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