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7817 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Mar 2018 at 12:45 PM (32 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-03-04 09:04:55 AM  
No one makes Vines any more.
 
2018-03-04 12:53:00 PM  
s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-04 12:56:42 PM  
I don't even know what it is.
 
2018-03-04 12:57:50 PM  
Silicon Valley did it:

If you say we're "pre revenue" it makes us a potential pure play.

Amazon has lost money for the last twenty farking years and Bezos is the farking King.

R.O.I.
Know what ROI stands for?

Radio
On
Internet

Silicon Valley No Revenue | Radio On Internet
Youtube BzAdXyPYKQo
 
2018-03-04 01:00:09 PM  

jmr61: I don't even know what it is.


I use radio instead, you probably never heard of it
 
2018-03-04 01:04:49 PM  

LewDux: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

I use radio instead, you probably never heard of it


Where can I download a copy of radio?
 
2018-03-04 01:06:33 PM  

jmr61: I don't even know what it is.


You're probably not a millennial, then. You probably enjoy "owning" things instead of renting them. You may, for instance, download music, which you then own forever. Or maybe you're some ancient fogey who buys music on CDs. Millennials are fascinated with something called "the sharing economy" which means just renting everything. Spotify allows them to pay a monthly fee to listen to the same song over and over again, whereas you probably just bought the song once and now listen to it over and over again for free.
 
2018-03-04 01:08:43 PM  

Weatherkiss: LewDux: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

I use radio instead, you probably never heard of it

Where can I download a copy of radio?


You don't want to do that. It's a very bad movie, unless you just really have a burning desire to see Cuba Gooding play a retard.

atlantablackstar.comView Full Size

/Spoiler alert: Everyone thought they were teaching Radio, but in the end it turned out he was teaching them.
 
2018-03-04 01:11:23 PM  
I would just like to be able to look at people's Spotify playlists without having to sign up.

I really don't have any need for the service.  I'm sure it's great, but I have my own music collection.
 
2018-03-04 01:16:01 PM  

Glitchwerks: I would just like to be able to look at people's Spotify playlists without having to sign up.

I really don't have any need for the service.  I'm sure it's great, but I have my own music collection.


I use Amazon Music. It's cheaper than Spotify and I haven't yet gone looking for something they didn't have. I just find it a lot more convenient than buying and owning music. It's like $12 a month for the whole family.
 
2018-03-04 01:20:43 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

You're probably not a millennial, then. You probably enjoy "owning" things instead of renting them. You may, for instance, download music, which you then own forever. Or maybe you're some ancient fogey who buys music on CDs. Millennials are fascinated with something called "the sharing economy" which means just renting everything. Spotify allows them to pay a monthly fee to listen to the same song over and over again, whereas you probably just bought the song once and now listen to it over and over again for free.


And in the end the artist gets screwed as well making almost nothing anymore from "selling" their music on streaming.
 
2018-03-04 01:31:32 PM  
Depends on where that money goes after issuing stock. You could build one hell of a record company on a billion dollar seed, signing talent and booking tours. And that's where the money has always been, filling concert venues, getting a cut of the ticket price. Start building your own talentless hacks who only gain fame because they're dangled in front of everyone and praised for being famous.
 
2018-03-04 01:38:22 PM  
How can you 'value' a company that has ZERO control of the "inventory"?
 
2018-03-04 01:48:40 PM  

LewDux: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

I use radio instead, you probably never heard of it


I prefer Mexican radio.  It uses real cane sugar.
Wall Of Voodoo - Mexican Radio
Youtube eyCEexG9xjw
 
2018-03-04 02:05:54 PM  
ScrimBoy: And in the end the artist gets screwed as well making almost nothing anymore from "selling" their music on streaming.

I had a go at being a rock musician here in Los Angeles in the late 70's/early 80's. At least back then, yeah, you struggled with shiatty gigs and a-hole lead singers (< redundant) and scummy music business people but if you were lucky and had the right band at the right time, you could do really well. Now it seems that although the traditional music business that was in place until about ten years ago has collapsed, it seems even worse now for musicians just trying to make a living so that they don't have to work 2 jobs just to pay the bills.

wildcardjack: And that's where the money has always been, filling concert venues, getting a cut of the ticket price.

You might want to consult Dolly Parton's accountant about that. She's easily made $20-30 million bucks off of I Will Always Love You as it was a hit for her, Whitney Houston and a few others. See also: Paul McCartney and Yesterday and many others. This man has lived a comfortable middle-class life thanks to this one song:

img.fark.netView Full Size


Songwriting royalties are gold mines, because they don't have all the expenses of touring and those songs can be sold to movies/commercials and so on (which Greenbaum has done well ), which gives them another bump in popularity. When I was in bands, the fights over songwriting credits were the worse because everyone knew that's where potential fortunes were.
 
2018-03-04 02:14:00 PM  
Oh, and for all those people still spouting the tired line that "Amazon keeps losing money" it's time to educate yourself

tl;dr version: they be making LOTS of profit.
 
2018-03-04 02:30:41 PM  
Henry Holland:

Song writing credits aren't the gold mine, they're lottery tickets. As with most forms of commercialisable art.
 
2018-03-04 02:39:28 PM  
I'm getting mighty tired of headlines that don't even hint at content.
 
2018-03-04 02:39:58 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: /Spoiler alert: Everyone thought they were teaching Radio, but in the end it turned out he was teaching them.


Now tell me who Ronin is. And don't tell me "it's a state of mind" because that's a cop out.
 
2018-03-04 03:22:30 PM  
Spotify comes as an option with cellphone plans here.

I prefer to listen to radio for free, shrug.
 
2018-03-04 03:28:32 PM  
Then to justify the $20bn investors sunk into the stock purchase, they would have to turn a profit, which would mean milking the user base with higher prices.
 
2018-03-04 03:47:53 PM  

Wireless Joe: LewDux: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

I use radio instead, you probably never heard of it

I prefer Mexican radio.  It uses real cane sugar.
[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/eyCEexG9​xjw]


Atmospherics after dark can be really creepy.


Atmospherics: Listen To The Radio
Youtube r9qz_bnJVlw
 
2018-03-04 04:12:34 PM  

Henry Holland: ScrimBoy: And in the end the artist gets screwed as well making almost nothing anymore from "selling" their music on streaming.

I had a go at being a rock musician here in Los Angeles in the late 70's/early 80's. At least back then, yeah, you struggled with shiatty gigs and a-hole lead singers (< redundant) and scummy music business people but if you were lucky and had the right band at the right time, you could do really well. Now it seems that although the traditional music business that was in place until about ten years ago has collapsed, it seems even worse now for musicians just trying to make a living so that they don't have to work 2 jobs just to pay the bills.

wildcardjack: And that's where the money has always been, filling concert venues, getting a cut of the ticket price.

You might want to consult Dolly Parton's accountant about that. She's easily made $20-30 million bucks off of I Will Always Love You as it was a hit for her, Whitney Houston and a few others. See also: Paul McCartney and Yesterday and many others. This man has lived a comfortable middle-class life thanks to this one song:

[img.fark.net image 295x300]

Songwriting royalties are gold mines, because they don't have all the expenses of touring and those songs can be sold to movies/commercials and so on (which Greenbaum has done well ), which gives them another bump in popularity. When I was in bands, the fights over songwriting credits were the worse because everyone knew that's where potential fortunes were.


I don't know about the "gold mine" part.  My 1/9 share of a song written by my grandpa in 1911 generates less than $50/year, even though it was. #1 hit..
 
2018-03-04 04:45:32 PM  
Gough: I don't know about the "gold mine" part. My 1/9 share of a song written by my grandpa in 1911 generates less than $50/year, even though it was. #1 hit..

Oops, should have written "can be gold mines if you own the full copywright".
 
2018-03-04 05:09:32 PM  

ScrimBoy: And in the end the artist gets screwed as well making almost nothing anymore from "selling" their music on streaming.


Well, the real money is in live performance and touring.

And some musicians are really lazy about that. They think they should be able to release one album a year and be able to live solely off its profits, and blame the internet for making that an impossibility.

For a business school marketing class I worked with a NYC-based musician to help her boost her record sales (she independently recorded and distributed). She had no problem selling out concert halls with 500 seats, and the money from that was really good. And, I polled her Facebook followers and they wanted more live concerts, not recordings. My recommendation to her was forget about recordings - she was never going to sell 100,000 units or anything - and perform more. But she just scoffed at that suggestion.

I also told her that she needed to hire a social media manager because she wasn't posting enough on Facebook and Instagram. When I presented this in class her manager was in attendance and he blew a gasket at that suggestion. We got into a heated argument about the value of Facebook (this was 2012). People in class said it was surreal.
 
2018-03-04 05:27:00 PM  

Henry Holland: I had a go at being a rock musician here in Los Angeles in the late 70's/early 80's. At least back then, yeah, you struggled with shiatty gigs and a-hole lead singers (< redundant) and scummy music business people but if you were lucky and had the right band at the right time, you could do really well. Now it seems that although the traditional music business that was in place until about ten years ago has collapsed, it seems even worse now for musicians just trying to make a living so that they don't have to work 2 jobs just to pay the bills.


The problem is that all barriers are gone. Most people back then had to sweat to get a record deal to get promoted and so forth.

I think in some ways the period 1960-2010 should be seen as somewhat temporary. There were two technologies happening: 1) recording music and 2) promoting music. You could replicate music many times over, but there were very few promotional channels. So, a few people made a ton of money by being on the promotional channels. Along comes YouTube and iTunes and there's plenty of promotional channels.

No-one was rich from music in the 1930s. I mean, not McCartney/Madonna/Eagles rich. You couldn't scale it. You played clubs.
 
2018-03-04 07:59:54 PM  
And they'll still be paying the artists that create the music damn near nothing?
 
2018-03-05 12:23:00 AM  

farkeruk: Henry Holland: I had a go at being a rock musician here in Los Angeles in the late 70's/early 80's. At least back then, yeah, you struggled with shiatty gigs and a-hole lead singers (< redundant) and scummy music business people but if you were lucky and had the right band at the right time, you could do really well. Now it seems that although the traditional music business that was in place until about ten years ago has collapsed, it seems even worse now for musicians just trying to make a living so that they don't have to work 2 jobs just to pay the bills.

The problem is that all barriers are gone. Most people back then had to sweat to get a record deal to get promoted and so forth.



Thanks, Malcolm
 
2018-03-05 01:10:59 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: jmr61: I don't even know what it is.

You're probably not a millennial, then. You probably enjoy "owning" things instead of renting them. You may, for instance, download music, which you then own forever. Or maybe you're some ancient fogey who buys music on CDs. Millennials are fascinated with something called "the sharing economy" which means just renting everything. Spotify allows them to pay a monthly fee to listen to the same song over and over again, whereas you probably just bought the song once and now listen to it over and over again for free.


And here I am, been wasting my money on music and other media LIKE A CHUMP.

/just kidding.  I pirate everything.
//DOWNLOAD ALL THE THINGS!!!
 
2018-03-05 10:24:36 AM  
i58.photobucket.comView Full Size
 
2018-03-05 12:18:46 PM  
I don't know how you could possibly give Spotify a value that high. They're basically just internet radio, and they play fewer ads (and make less money) per broadcast hour than radio.  They also produce none of their own content.  So what money do they make?  Just advertising and they don't do a lot of that.

Especially with the risks involved - i.e. any music label could just pull their music off Spotify in an instant - it's too risky to be given any value at all really.
 
2018-03-05 04:23:28 PM  
The industry has never regained the profitability it enjoyed before the likes of Natpster ripped up its business model.
...
Just four music companies control the rights to 87% of the music streamed on Spotify," says the Hargreaves analyst Laith Khalaf, "which gives them a healthy bargaining position when it comes to getting their pound of flesh from Spotify's revenues.

Sounds like "The Industry" is doing fine by their own standards. Priority #1 is not on finding & promoting talent or ensuring that their business model fits with the marketplace. Nope, the music biz has been a playground for lawyers first and foremost for a long time now.

Unfortunately, companies like Spotify are enabling them. When billions of dollars of capital can be thrown at licensing regardless of profitability, there is no incentive for the labels to innovate or bother competing. They are making their money without lifting a finger. And the next audio streaming service to rise out of Spotify's carcass will pay the same tribute. The industry that should have starved on its own delusional greed is still being fed because no music service can survive with a limited library.
 
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