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(Medical Xpress)   Headline: "Heart attack patients prescribed antidepressants have worse one-year survival" Article: "the cause is not necessarily related directly to the antidepressants." So you may or may not have that going for you, which may or may not be nice   ( medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Myocardial infarction, heart attack, acute myocardial infarction, heart attack patients, Atherosclerosis, antidepressants, Stroke, subsequent heart attack  
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407 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Mar 2018 at 11:30 AM (32 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-03-04 09:07:42 AM  
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"Ask your doctor if he is as confused as you are"
 
2018-03-04 09:15:11 AM  
Antidepressants don't cure all depression, just chemically related depression.
 
2018-03-04 09:31:54 AM  
'So if you, or someone you love.....'
 
2018-03-04 11:31:05 AM  
What about erections?
 
2018-03-04 11:35:51 AM  
Well since the data is not conclusive, how about an anecdote?

I know a man who had a massive heart attack (he was clinically dead for a surprisingly long time before they brought him back) who has been on antidepressants as part of his cardiac care. He's still alive over 10 years later. He suffers from severe clinical depression and the antidepressants don't seem to be doing much, or, if they are, I shudder to think what he'd be going through without them. I'm going to speculate that he'd be dead without them -- potentially suicide.
 
2018-03-04 11:37:27 AM  
I've had multiple heart attacks.  Never been prescribed anti-depressants. They (the MI's) just pissed me off.

/Quote from wife "Well, they're not killing you, so really they're just a huge inconvenience".
 
2018-03-04 11:49:08 AM  
If you think about it, people are prescribed the anti-depressants because they're... wait for it... depressed. People who have had heart attacks and are not depressed are more likely to survive. The deciding factor is being depressed rather than the drugs.

Ric Romero reporting, Fark Not News Network.
 
2018-03-04 11:53:37 AM  
Worse one year survival? As opposed to kinda nifty one year survival?
 
2018-03-04 11:58:12 AM  
The rate of all-cause mortality at one-year after discharge was 7.4% in patients prescribed antidepressants compared to 3.4% for those not prescribed antidepressants (p<0.001).

Ok, that's much better than I thought and reassuring considering I had my first heart-attack (non-acute) err 33 days ago.
 
2018-03-04 12:00:08 PM  
Science is inherently provisional. A theory about heart attacks or the laws of gravitation or the shape of planetary orbits is a starting point for further study and better theories. This is, or should be, widely known. Headline writing does not allow nuance.
People at risk for heart disease should enters these studies into their risk/benefit calculations.
 
2018-03-04 12:20:03 PM  

bingethinker: If you think about it, people are prescribed the anti-depressants because they're... wait for it... depressed. People who have had heart attacks and are not depressed are more likely to survive. The deciding factor is being depressed rather than the drugs.

Ric Romero reporting, Fark Not News Network.


Not only that, but it could also be that some physical cause of heart disease also causes depression. In fact, I think I recall reading stuff about how chronic inflammation is related to both.
 
2018-03-04 12:37:18 PM  
My Ex-wife would be a great example of how not to treat depression. I think, at this point, I would have an easier list of what she hadn't been on at some point.

10 years later, at least I can conclude our relationship was not the sole cause of whatever her problems are/were.
 
2018-03-04 12:45:33 PM  

bingethinker: If you think about it, people are prescribed the anti-depressants because they're... wait for it... depressed. People who have had heart attacks and are not depressed are more likely to survive. The deciding factor is being depressed rather than the drugs.

Ric Romero reporting, Fark Not News Network.


What about depressed people not on antidepressants?
 
2018-03-04 12:59:06 PM  

bingethinker: If you think about it, people are prescribed the anti-depressants because they're... wait for it... depressed. People who have had heart attacks and are not depressed are more likely to survive. The deciding factor is being depressed rather than the drugs.

Ric Romero reporting, Fark Not News Network.


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2018-03-04 01:14:49 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: My Ex-wife would be a great example of how not to treat depression. I think, at this point, I would have an easier list of what she hadn't been on at some point.

10 years later, at least I can conclude our relationship was not the sole cause of whatever her problems are/were.


We tend to function under the assumption that a person's mood depends on events around them, ie. I am happy because things are going well, I am sad because things are not going well, etc.

When a person has clinical depression, they just feel sad and low energy as their default setting, so to speak.  It has less to do with the people and conditions in their life and more to do with their wiring.
 
2018-03-04 01:24:31 PM  
Depressed people are much less likely to move around much,  so they Don't get back into (or into) shape. They're also less likely to follow a revised diet, or eat healthy at all.
 
2018-03-04 01:33:28 PM  

Skyking Skyking Do Not Answer: Evil Twin Skippy: My Ex-wife would be a great example of how not to treat depression. I think, at this point, I would have an easier list of what she hadn't been on at some point.

10 years later, at least I can conclude our relationship was not the sole cause of whatever her problems are/were.

We tend to function under the assumption that a person's mood depends on events around them, ie. I am happy because things are going well, I am sad because things are not going well, etc.

When a person has clinical depression, they just feel sad and low energy as their default setting, so to speak.  It has less to do with the people and conditions in their life and more to do with their wiring.


Who is this "we"?

I wake up in the morning. Put my pants on one leg at a time. I have to remind myself to look on the bright side of life. Continually. I also have to remind myself that just because the beginning of my life read like a creation story for a Marvel character, that kind of shiat doesn't happen anymore. Mostly because I have surrounded myself with caring, empathetic, and non-sucidal people.

My ex was a coddled daughter of a preacher. Her world never changed, and never did it not conform to what was in her head.

I don't in fact thing my feeling are a product of our environment. If I did I would have suck started a pistol years ago. Feeling are those quasi-helpful firings off the brain does after events transpire. It's like your brain's equivalent to the 6 o'clock news. By the time conciousness and emotion attacks a problem the actual events are over.

Some people have trained theirs to be the lifetime channel. Some have Pravda. Others are "car crashes and boobs." Mine... I think is more or less a late night comedy star who is as sick of what he sees as the audience.
 
2018-03-04 01:48:42 PM  
In a related study it was found that people prescribed anti-psychotics were more likely to commit violent crimes.
 
2018-03-05 04:28:11 AM  

berylman: The rate of all-cause mortality at one-year after discharge was 7.4% in patients prescribed antidepressants compared to 3.4% for those not prescribed antidepressants (p<0.001).

Ok, that's much better than I thought and reassuring considering I had my first heart-attack (non-acute) err 33 days ago.


And you won't let us forget it.

/glad you're on this side of the dirt
//
///
 
2018-03-05 04:38:16 AM  
Sounds a lot like the press release issued Feb. 6 by FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (fark the "MD," what's the abbreviation for "Lyin' Quack Tool of Big Pharma"?)
 
2018-03-05 09:26:32 AM  
CSB time:
My antidepressants almost gave me a heart attack. When I was going through the motions of eliminating factors for headaches, they put me on an antidepressant cause obviously I was too emotional and it had to be hysterical woman syndrome. Well the one they had me on had a side effect of raising your heart rate in a very small group of people, I was lucky enough to be in that group, but it wasn't listed as a most common side effect. One day I'm walking upstairs and my heart rate goes crazy, I fall down, husband takes me to doctor, doctor looks up my meds, doctor calls neurologist (same building), I get taken off the meds and finally get authorization for the botox. I was 28 when this went down. Luckily nobody will suggest antidepressants to me again.
 
2018-03-05 09:33:43 AM  

Unikitty: And you won't let us forget it.


Jeez, I only mentioned it once before it like a ten word sentence.  I'll get over it (feeling better thank you).
 
2018-03-05 10:01:00 AM  

berylman: Unikitty: And you won't let us forget it.

Jeez, I only mentioned it once before it like a ten word sentence.  I'll get over it (feeling better thank you).


I tease because I care.
 
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