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    More: Interesting, AI, Artificial intelligence, Machine learning, AI research, AI agent, video games, AI researcher Miles, Evolution  
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4200 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Mar 2018 at 12:54 AM (20 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-02-28 11:53:42 PM  
I for one welcome our Q*bert-cheesing overlords.
 
2018-03-01 12:25:33 AM  
The headline translates to "Where is Sarah Connor."
 
2018-03-01 12:59:19 AM  
Inferior desktop port. Not that surprising. The arcade machine likely doesn't have the same glitch.

More like a non-story.
 
2018-03-01 01:13:45 AM  
You mean Atari games were terrible and broken shadows of their arcade ports? Say it ain't so, AI robot.
 
2018-03-01 01:15:30 AM  
A machine with a reaction time a million times faster than a human finds something humans can't?

Well, duh.

It's comparable to humans using a microscope to see things the naked eye can't.
 
2018-03-01 01:19:16 AM  
grawlix:
1) A string of typographical symbols, especially "@#$%&!", used (especially in comic strips) to represent an obscenity or swearword.
2) A spiral-shaped graphic used to indicate swearing in comic strips.
3) A series of violence related images in a speech bubble to represent obscenity, swearwords, or profanity.

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2018-03-01 01:26:22 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: grawlix:
1) A string of typographical symbols, especially "@#$%&!", used (especially in comic strips) to represent an obscenity or swearword.
2) A spiral-shaped graphic used to indicate swearing in comic strips.
3) A series of violence related images in a speech bubble to represent obscenity, swearwords, or profanity.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 366x300]

[upload.wikimedia.org image 150x257]


The true legacy of Mort Walker, creator of Beetle Bailey (because the comic strip has been 70 years of instantly forgettable pap).
 
2018-03-01 01:41:18 AM  
 It looks like the AI is jumping on squares that are one particular color.
 
2018-03-01 01:48:25 AM  

scalpod: ArcadianRefugee: grawlix:
1) A string of typographical symbols, especially "@#$%&!", used (especially in comic strips) to represent an obscenity or swearword.
2) A spiral-shaped graphic used to indicate swearing in comic strips.
3) A series of violence related images in a speech bubble to represent obscenity, swearwords, or profanity.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 366x300]

[upload.wikimedia.org image 150x257]

The true legacy of Mort Walker, creator of Beetle Bailey (because the comic strip has been 70 years of instantly forgettable pap).


While Walker coined the term "grawlix" (n a 1964 article for the National Cartoonist Society), the earliest use of such can be traced back to 1902, at least:

img.fark.netView Full Size


at least according to one blogger (who prefers the term "obscenicon", a term said blogger coined (so fark him). Apparently grawlix initially referred only to the squiggly lines, though now it is used to refer to all maledicta.

Though I do like Walker's book about comic strip language:

Under the heading of maledicta:

img.fark.netView Full Size


Emanata:

img.fark.netView Full Size


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-03-01 01:59:55 AM  

Gnaglor: It looks like the AI is jumping on squares that are one particular color.


My suspicion: That's not the part that matters.

In Q*bert, you receive a bonus after completing a level. In this port of Q*bert, it looks like the programmer showed off a bit by adding the bonus to your score 100 points every tenth of a second, rather than just adding it all at once like the arcade version does. There's presumably code in there somewhere for "Once I've added the right number of bonus points, stop adding points and move on to the next level." The AI's found some input that triggers a bug in this code, so Q*bert is allowed to keep moving (as if the level was still going on), and the score just keeps racking up 100 points every tenth of a second. The game's still crediting 25 points for every move as well, but the bonus scoring vastly outpaces the scoring that the AI gets from actual "play" at that point; once the AI has triggered the bug, the only thing it has to do is "don't jump off the pyramid".

You can see some of the drawbacks of this AI style in the early seconds of the clip. It's actually pretty bad at conventional Q*bert. It appears to have learned "Okay, I don't want to lose my last life by jumping off the board, because then I stop scoring points"; but it hasn't extended that lesson to "Maybe I should try to preserve my earlier lives too." So it basically throws away all but the last life. Since its evolution mechanism is "maximize points", once it learns how to trigger the bug (which gives it All The Points), it has no evolutionary 'incentive' to actually get better at the normal part of the game, as long as it can manage to finish the first level, and as long as it can at least semi-reliably trigger the bug.
 
2018-03-01 02:15:40 AM  
Curious, though: article says no human had discovered the bug; but now that we know it exists, can a human take advantage of it?
 
2018-03-01 03:44:45 AM  
As soon as I saw what the exploit was, I knew what kind of AI this had to be.
 
2018-03-01 03:45:28 AM  
The AI that finally beat top human pros at heads up No Limit Texas Holdem for a statistically significant amount over time also developed a very unhuman approach to the game. It played a series of huge river all-in overbets that were almost perfectly correctly balanced between bluffs and value bets.
 
2018-03-01 03:55:43 AM  

aerojockey: As soon as I saw what the exploit was, I knew what kind of AI this had to be.


Well, it found an optimal solution...
 
2018-03-01 05:06:05 AM  
CSB: I just played Q*Bert yesterday at my team outing yesterday to a local arcade/bar. Fun time and a great place with some of the classics!
 
2018-03-01 08:24:24 AM  

LesserEvil: CSB: I just played Q*Bert yesterday at my team outing yesterday to a local arcade/bar. Fun time and a great place with some of the classics!


Wait, at your team outing WHEN did this happen at your team outing?  Local arcade/bars are fun times at local arcade/bars.  The classics are definitely classics.

/justjoshingyoufella  :)
 
2018-03-01 08:48:04 AM  

scottydoesntknow: The headline translates to "Where is Sarah Connor."


I read that and think that some AI will come up with new ways of killing humans than we have thought of.

Q*bert that allowed it to rack up near infinite points.

Me too. I played once in '82 and got just as close to infinity.
 
2018-03-01 09:29:39 AM  
I never did play that much Qbert but I did sink some time into this sort of descendant. Enough that I still to this day get the music stuck in my head from time to time.

Amiga Longplay Jumping Jack'Son
Youtube HLhaigSiJZI
 
2018-03-01 09:38:09 AM  
ArcadianRefugee:
Emanata:

[img.fark.net image 596x330]


Berkeley Breathed (of Bloom County) used the term "boozles" for the "slightly drunk" ones, which I approve of
 
2018-03-01 09:46:10 AM  
Meanwhile, the first recorded instance of AI suicide occurred when an AI deleted itself after trying to beat Battletoads.
 
2018-03-01 10:04:36 AM  
Damned AI is a hack... Back in the day I used to go into the arcade and pop a quarter into the Qbert machine and stay until closing. Don't remember how many points I reached, but no cheats or hacks needed.

/Pfft... Amateur
//Used to do the same on Pac-Man, Galaga and a number of other games as well... Arcade owner threw me out for a month one time.
///Get off my lawn
 
2018-03-01 10:09:53 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

"Percent sign, ampersand, dollar sign"
"And colon, semi-colon too!"

/"Swearing in longhand, asterisk mouth"
 
2018-03-01 11:24:43 AM  
OH NOOOOOO00000ooooo...
 
2018-03-01 11:35:38 AM  
KickahaOta

Likely

Target = score + 1000
While score != target
Score = score +100
Wend

And a race condition disabling player movement. So just one jump makes the != test always false.

Likely the AI could just stop and watch the score overflow eventually.
 
2018-03-01 11:38:35 AM  
Lesson to all coders, test for != only in rare circumstances. Less than would have been appropriate here, when adding.
 
2018-03-01 12:34:24 PM  
Okay, first of all a bit of nerd rage, and then second of all a CSB.

Nerd rage:  Q*Bert is not an Atari game in the same way that Asteroids and Centipede are Atari games.  The arcade game was created by Gottlieb, and most home ports were created by Parker Brothers.  Yes, the game was ported to several Atari systems, but in the strict journalistic sense that doesn't make it an "Atari game" (my humble opinion here), particularly given how the Atari versions likely weren't the most popular versions of the game.  I like how the article doesn't even mention which system the AI was playing, though the video confirms it is the Atari 2600 version.

CSB:  I actually found this bug a long time ago, though completely by accident and not in a way I could ever consistently duplicate.  I would complete a level, fiddle with the joystick while the end-of-level theme played and the bonus score added up, and then next thing I know I would fall off the platform, and then the next level would have odd cube colors (a left-over of the platform color-cycling during the bonus count).  Had I anticipated the bug and moved up and around of the platform instead of accidentally suiciding off of it, I probably would have seen the infinite points that the AI triggered.

Atari 2600 Q*Bert has several bugs along these lines, including another one involving Coily that also lets you get unlimited points on the very first level.
 
2018-03-01 02:39:10 PM  

SkunkWorx: Atari 2600 Q*Bert has several bugs along these lines, including another one involving Coily that also lets you get unlimited points on the very first level.


You may be amused to know that another version of the AI actually found the Coily bug as well.

"We next study the game Qbert, in which Canonical ES found two particularly interesting solutions. In the first case (https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=-p7VhdTXA0k)​, the agent gathers some points at the beginning of the game and then stops showing interest in completing the level. Instead, it starts to bait an enemy that follows it to kill itself. Specifically, the agent learns that it can jump off the platform when the enemy is right next to it, because the enemy will follow: although the agent loses a life, killing the enemy yields enough points to gain an extra life again (Figure 7). The agent repeats this cycle of suicide and killing the opponent over and over again."
 
2018-03-01 11:32:45 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Curious, though: article says no human had discovered the bug; but now that we know it exists, can a human take advantage of it?


Depends. This is a really cool video about human speed runs of SMB 1 where they were trying to squeeze time out of level 4-2. A TAS run demonstrated an 'impossible for humans' bug that players eventually figured out how to do.

4-2: The History of Super Mario Bros.' Most Infamous Level
Youtube i1AHCaokqhg
 
2018-03-02 12:50:07 AM  

Witty_Retort: ArcadianRefugee: Curious, though: article says no human had discovered the bug; but now that we know it exists, can a human take advantage of it?

Depends. This is a really cool video about human speed runs of SMB 1 where they were trying to squeeze time out of level 4-2. A TAS run demonstrated an 'impossible for humans' bug that players eventually figured out how to do.

[YouTube video: 4-2: The History of Super Mario Bros.' Most Infamous Level]


Aside: it always grates on my ears when someone pronounces the game's name as "Super Mario Bros" and not "Super Mario Brothers".
 
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