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(All Recipes)   Fark Food Thread: It's time for us to share recipes for kids. Difficulty: Not what you cook for them.. but what you cook with kids and help them learn their way around food and a kitchen   ( allrecipes.com) divider line
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1276 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Feb 2018 at 5:00 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-22 02:59:45 PM  
Grilled cheese sandwich
 
2018-02-22 03:02:30 PM  
Whisky.
 
2018-02-22 03:04:54 PM  
I've found that a side of fava beans and a nice chianti pair nicely when I cook with kids.
 
2018-02-22 03:05:29 PM  
Mac-n-Cheese
Eggs
Oatmeal
Grilled Cheese
Ramen
Salads
Fruit salads.

These are all things my own son makes all on his own, and he's learning more.
We found a Magic Bullet at Goodwill, and he is now making his own fruit smoothies.
We also all watch the Master Cheffseries together. 

/We eat really well.
 
2018-02-22 03:06:54 PM  
Lesson 0: safety
Lesson 1: plain boiled rice
Lesson 2: sauteed mushrooms and onions to add to the rice
Lesson 3: corn bread from a mix
Lesson 5: scrambled eggs
Lesson 6: hard-boiled eggs
Lesson 6.1: deviled eggs
 
2018-02-22 03:07:15 PM  
My kid's got food chops.
i291.photobucket.comView Full Size

She made all this herself.
 
2018-02-22 03:15:10 PM  
Don't have any kids that I officially know of.  I remember the falcon days of my youth, when my mom taught me a great deal of my present cooking knowledge...

"Cabbage!  The glasses for the Mannaschewitz are in the cabinet NEXT to the wine cupboard.  You idiot!!"
 
2018-02-22 03:15:57 PM  
i'd start with basics like a pbj Sammy. slowly but surely learn to use those tools. mrs swimo watches televised children's bake-offs. truly impressive how skilled and learned those children are. --- encourage the kids to taste test. taste those spices! experiment! get a popular cookbook that has standard American fare and see if your children can get through the book in, say, a year.
 
2018-02-22 03:16:03 PM  
My kid loves making meatballs and a type of muffins I make that are mostly beans and eggs that he calls "fart muffins".
 
2018-02-22 03:21:45 PM  

hillbillypharmacist: My kid's got food chops.
[i291.photobucket.com image 434x434]
She made all this herself.


Nice choice in dishes. 
We have quite a collection of fiestaware as well.

/really, I'm talking about dishes... SMH
 
2018-02-22 03:22:59 PM  

Dodger: That's awesome! But, um - What's with the white spots all over the toast. How does a toaster do THAT?


Used a toaster oven - that's where the butter pats were.

Drakuun: Nice choice in dishes.
We have quite a collection of fiestaware as well.


fiestaware is just delightful.
 
2018-02-22 03:29:42 PM  
I started having them cook the packaged stuff, box dinners, tacos and so on. From there, things like cooking pasta. This got them to learn to use the stove, stir, manage pans and the like.

Now the boy is planning his first meal to cook for us; he had to decide the whole meal, then figure out what goes into it. I'll take him to the store this weekend and he'll pick all the ingredients. Fun times. Both kids were pretty finicky eaters when they were younger, now that the boy is older, his palette is a little more broad and he's willing to try new or more complex foods - which makes this a lot more enjoyable.
 
2018-02-22 03:54:13 PM  

Dodger: dr_blasto: I started having them cook the packaged stuff, box dinners, tacos and so on. From there, things like cooking pasta. This got them to learn to use the stove, stir, manage pans and the like.

Now the boy is planning his first meal to cook for us; he had to decide the whole meal, then figure out what goes into it. I'll take him to the store this weekend and he'll pick all the ingredients. Fun times. Both kids were pretty finicky eaters when they were younger, now that the boy is older, his palette is a little more broad and he's willing to try new or more complex foods - which makes this a lot more enjoyable.

How old is he? Mines just like that too. Mine's 27.


14

lol
 
2018-02-22 04:25:33 PM  
When I saw "recipes for kids" I thought "finally! A use for all those little bastards running around this neighborhood" Then I see you meant recipes you makewith kids helping....
 
2018-02-22 05:01:06 PM  
Meth
 
2018-02-22 05:02:46 PM  

Drakuun: We found a Magic Bullet at Goodwill


Isn't s Magic Bullit one of those little vibrators?  Should you really be preparing food with one of those things?
 
2018-02-22 05:05:04 PM  
Fun project for little kids, if you don't mind them eating fat and sugar.

Softened cream cheese (Full fat type, stick kind, 1 pkg is usually ok.

1 8 oz (or larger) marshmallow Fluff. (1:1 weight ratio with the cream cheese)

Mash the cream cheese thoroughly with a fork first, flattening it. Mix in marshmallow Fluff, at roughly the 1:1 weight ratio. Weirdly, the whole thing will start to turn to liquid the more you mix it, until you get this dip-like stuff.

Dip cut fruit into it.

Adult friends of mine have been known to look around the kitchen to find something to dip into this mix when the fruit runs out.
 
2018-02-22 05:05:19 PM  
Cookies.

Quick breads

Pizza.

Scrambled eggs.

Simple stuff
 
2018-02-22 05:05:47 PM  

FrancoFile: Lesson 0: safety
Lesson 1: plain boiled rice
Lesson 2: sauteed mushrooms and onions to add to the rice
Lesson 3: corn bread from a mix
Lesson 5: scrambled eggs
Lesson 6: hard-boiled eggs
Lesson 6.1: deviled eggs


Lesson 4: profit?
 
2018-02-22 05:07:23 PM  
Blue Apron, Home Chef, Hello Fresh, or Gobble.

These services are great for kids, who don't have the budget, transportation, or motivation to plan a meal in advance. Everything just shows up, pre-measured. Cook with them for several weeks and then just let them loose on their own. They'll have better cooking skills than most adults before they enter high school. They'll gain the planning skills later, when they are heads of their own households.
 
2018-02-22 05:09:08 PM  

secondpsych: FrancoFile: Lesson 0: safety
Lesson 1: plain boiled rice
Lesson 2: sauteed mushrooms and onions to add to the rice
Lesson 3: corn bread from a mix
Lesson 5: scrambled eggs
Lesson 6: hard-boiled eggs
Lesson 6.1: deviled eggs

Lesson 4: profit?


There is no 4.  Three shall be the number of the recipe, and the number of the recipe shall be three.
 
2018-02-22 05:09:57 PM  
I think cooking kids will you get you into some legal trouble.
 
2018-02-22 05:10:38 PM  
I've taught all three of mine basic sauces, easy filling dinners and a lot of technique over the years.  My 21-year-old is a newly minted professional chef, so I get to live vicariously through them as they embark on a career path I never chose.

My youngest is 17 and I'm homeschooling them on more advanced dishes to get additional HS credit.  This weekend I'm walking them through a French style chicken and white bean stew with onion and lemon.

2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp butter
1/2 lb bacon, cut into lardons
8 cloves garlic, peeled
4 onions, quartered
2 tsp flour
2 1/2 c chicken stock
2 lemons, sliced thick
3 tbsp thyme, fresh
1 whole chicken
1 1/2 C small white beans, soaked overnight
salt and pepper, to taste

 Preheat oven to 375 deg F

Par-cook the beans for 30 minutes while prepping the rest of the ingredients
Drain well but don't rinse

Heat butter and oil in a heavy Dutch oven. 
Add bacon and cook until fat renders
Remove cooked bacon and drain on paper towel

Add onions and garlic and brown over medium high heat.
Stir in flour, then add stock.
Return bacon to pan
Add lemon and thyme

Bring to boil, stirring constantly, until sauce thickens
Place whole chicken on top
Place in preheated oven for 1 hour, basting chicken every 20 minutes

Add beans
Bake an additional 30 minutes, basting twice

Remove chicken to a cutting board
Carve and roughly chop all the meat off the bone
Add meat to pot and serve
 
2018-02-22 05:10:39 PM  

Dodger: hillbillypharmacist: Dodger: That's awesome! But, um - What's with the white spots all over the toast. How does a toaster do THAT?

Used a toaster oven - that's where the butter pats were.

Drakuun: Nice choice in dishes.
We have quite a collection of fiestaware as well.

fiestaware is just delightful.

Ahhh, so it was ... pre-buttered before toasting. Make's sense. I tried that once when drunk with a regular stand-up toaster. (drunkenly re-toasting old cold buttered toast). In a normal toaster it catches fire. Ask me how I know. :)


You just told us. Are you drunk again?
 
2018-02-22 05:13:37 PM  
Agile Baking with Scrum

My kids enjoyed doing that.
Taught them baking and taught them scrum.

They mostly just liked the chocolate, but they still enjoyed the process.
 
2018-02-22 05:15:37 PM  
Children should be challenged so I think it's good to start them out with Fugu.
 
2018-02-22 05:16:24 PM  
I have experienced a stew with a kid once.
The meat is just soooo tender.

/especially compared to older goats
//feeling about guilty about that these days
///at least wait until they wean off momma goat
 
2018-02-22 05:16:49 PM  
The first sauce I taught them is hollandaise.  It's not all that difficult, and I deliberately had the sauce break while I was teaching them so I could show them how to recover.

5 egg yolks
2 tbsp lemon juice
2 sticks butter, chilled and cut into 12 pieces
1/2 tsp dried parsley
white pepper to taste

Beat egg yolks and lemon juice until light yellow in color
Add to saucepan over low heat
Add a piece of chilled butter, and slowly whisk until butter is melted
Repeat with remaining pieces of butter until all are incorporated
Add parsley and white pepper

If the sauce breaks while preparing, beat a whole egg in a small bowl
Ladle about 1/2 cup of the broken sauce into the beaten egg
Whisk until smooth
Add back into broken sauce and lightly whisk until incorporated
 
2018-02-22 05:17:39 PM  
seriouseats.comView Full Size

/oblig
//it has a kid
///and delicious gelatin
 
2018-02-22 05:18:50 PM  
The nearly 11-year old loves to cook and we make basic mac-n-cheese from scratch.  She can do this on her own now nearly.

1.) Cook 1/2 box of pasta - set aside in a pan with the lid on so it doesn't dry out.
2.) In another pan add 2 tablespoons butter + 2 tablespoons flour over medium heat
3.) This is a basic roux - whisk this mixture until it's bubbly and starting to brown
4.) Add a cup of milk - keep whisking
5.) Add about a cup of whatever cheeses you like - I usually mix cheddar, mozzarella, and parmesan.  Keep whisking.
6.) When it's a nice mess of cheesy sauceness, add it to the pasta, or the pasta to it.

Serve immediately.

You can cook the pasta at the same time obviously, but for a kid I'm trying to keep the # of things going on at one time low - it's easier to make mistakes when you have to shift gears a lot.
 
2018-02-22 05:19:56 PM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: [seriouseats.com image 500x375]
/oblig
//it has a kid
///and delicious gelatin


If that wasn't an episode of "Steve Don't Eat It" it should have been
 
2018-02-22 05:20:06 PM  
Cookies are always easy. If super drunk me can do it, kids can too.

Video proof:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CoTuc​3​7DUcg&index=1&list=PL1JBBwvOnWBQ_DelLf​Ni0r3uvXhC6O4Xy&t=2s
 
2018-02-22 05:20:19 PM  

Resident Muslim: I have experienced a stew with a kid once.
The meat is just soooo tender.

/especially compared to older goats
//feeling about guilty about that these days
///at least wait until they wean off momma goat


So not quite guilty, just about guilty. Still enough for fainting

media.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-22 05:21:29 PM  

Lee451: When I saw "recipes for kids" I thought "finally! A use for all those little bastards running around this neighborhood" Then I see you meant recipes you makewith kids helping....


The key is a surprise kill. Just like cows, fear ruins the flavor of the meat.
 
2018-02-22 05:22:29 PM  
Started the boy in the kitchen on prep at about 8 years old. Got him a nice kid safe knife set from Amazon.
Chopping veggies and whatnot, adding theory as we moved to more challenging dishes.
He's 12 now and in full experimentation mode. He made a jalepeno, green apple and brie omelet the other morning that was outstanding.

 Honestly I can't think of a specific dish that we started out on. I would simply advise that if you think your child is ready and interested, get them cooking as early as possible. Start with stuff they like to eat and keep it positive and interesting.
 I also follow my dad's rule, unless otherwise inedible, you eat your mistakes. You learn much faster that way.
 
2018-02-22 05:22:31 PM  
Mac n cheese
Sour cream silver dollar pancakes
Eggs (pita)
Pbj
 
2018-02-22 05:22:40 PM  
My grandmother taught me to fry bacon and eggs when I was 5 or 6. She got tired of me asking for "dippy eggs" all the time. Dippy eggs are over easy eggs where you break the yolk open and dip your toast in the yolk.
Next thing I learned was french toast. Then waffles once I was big enough to be able to move the waffle maker around. She worked morning shift at a diner.
\,,/(>.<)\,,/
Breakfast!
 
2018-02-22 05:23:29 PM  

praxcelis: The first sauce I taught them is hollandaise.  It's not all that difficult, and I deliberately had the sauce break while I was teaching them so I could show them how to recover.

5 egg yolks
2 tbsp lemon juice
2 sticks butter, chilled and cut into 12 pieces
1/2 tsp dried parsley
white pepper to taste

Beat egg yolks and lemon juice until light yellow in color
Add to saucepan over low heat
Add a piece of chilled butter, and slowly whisk until butter is melted
Repeat with remaining pieces of butter until all are incorporated
Add parsley and white pepper

If the sauce breaks while preparing, beat a whole egg in a small bowl
Ladle about 1/2 cup of the broken sauce into the beaten egg
Whisk until smooth
Add back into broken sauce and lightly whisk until incorporated


Bechamel is a more universal first sauce.
 
2018-02-22 05:23:29 PM  
Alton Brown's Brownie recipe, I can't remember which cook book it is in, it is simple and has just enough ingredients to show them the basics of cooking.
 
2018-02-22 05:24:36 PM  
Ya know, you can spice them any way you want, but keep the good recipes in the family.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-22 05:26:33 PM  
When I'm cooking with kids I basically take any lamb recipe and just substitute kid meat.

/I'll go away now.
 
2018-02-22 05:27:38 PM  
Gramma started me on the super basics: scrambled eggs, then moved up to omelettes and the like. Taught me her mayonnaise recipe, and how to do a decent roux. Taught me how to use that roux as a foundation for sauces. Made scratch made chicken soup with vegetables.

Then she died, and I never learned how to make her pickled watermelon rinds or her spaghetti sauce that people would fight each other over for that last spoonful in the pan. Her home-canned salmon was to die for.

It was all in her head, and she wrote nothing down.
 
2018-02-22 05:28:11 PM  
If you can teach your kids a basic bread dough, it's an easy win in their eyes and you have delicious bread.  This is the dinner roll I showed my youngest for our last holiday dinner

2 tbsp active dry yeast
2/3 C warm water, 110 - 115 deg F
2 C flour
1 C warm mashed potatoes
2/3 C warm water
2/3 C sugar
2/3 C shortening
2 eggs, beaten
2 1/2 tsp salt
4 - 5 C flour

In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in 2/3 cup warm water. In a large bowl, combine mashed potatoes, sugar, shortening, eggs, salt, remaining 2/3 cup water, yeast mixture and 2 cups flour; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough.

Do not knead. Shape into a ball; place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease the top. Cover with plastic wrap; let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.

Punch down dough; divide into thirds. Divide and shape one portion into 15 balls; place in a greased 9-in. round baking pan. Cover with a kitchen towel. Repeat with remaining dough. Let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 375°.

Bake rolls until golden brown, 20-25 minutes. Remove from pans to wire racks. Serve warm
 
2018-02-22 05:28:37 PM  
Difficulty level varies depending on the kid (not the age but the temperament, skill level, and patience) but these are ones I've done with the kid that enjoys it, about 8 yo:

Pizza (pre-made dough with one, home-made dough with another).
Spaghetti
Lasagna
Various soups
Quiche
General Tso's Chicken
All kinds of potatoes - roasted, baked, twice baked, fries, mashed
Pesto chicken
Biscuits & gravy
Shrimp risotto
Various cold salads -  tossed, chicken salad, broccoli, waldorf
Sauteed mushrooms
Garlic bread
Pasta alfredo
Various sauteed veggies
Ceviche
Once she even pulled off a Bacon Explosion (with a little help)
 
2018-02-22 05:28:47 PM  

hillbillypharmacist: My kid's got food chops.
[i291.photobucket.com image 434x434]
She made all this herself.


You gave your kid a torch to toast with?
 
2018-02-22 05:29:12 PM  
Yeasted bread ticks all of the boxes:
Patience = better bread
Elbow grease = better bread
Fewer ingredients = better bread
 
2018-02-22 05:29:25 PM  
My 6-year old son always offers to help but we eat a lot of farking fried food (I'm sorta rican, wife's trini) and I'm paranoid about having his flakey ass hovering over a pan with a lot of oil.

Mostly, he helps out with shiat like muffins and pancakes. Usually from mixes, or from scratch if we're out of mix. Chopping up veggies for a rice or sauce base.
 
2018-02-22 05:29:28 PM  
Chocolate chip cookies.  Great incentivizer to learn how to bake.
 
2018-02-22 05:30:43 PM  
Cooking bacon in their bathing suit teaches them to be REALLY quick!
 
2018-02-22 05:30:48 PM  

JDJoeE: praxcelis: The first sauce I taught them is hollandaise.  It's not all that difficult, and I deliberately had the sauce break while I was teaching them so I could show them how to recover.

5 egg yolks
2 tbsp lemon juice
2 sticks butter, chilled and cut into 12 pieces
1/2 tsp dried parsley
white pepper to taste

Beat egg yolks and lemon juice until light yellow in color
Add to saucepan over low heat
Add a piece of chilled butter, and slowly whisk until butter is melted
Repeat with remaining pieces of butter until all are incorporated
Add parsley and white pepper

If the sauce breaks while preparing, beat a whole egg in a small bowl
Ladle about 1/2 cup of the broken sauce into the beaten egg
Whisk until smooth
Add back into broken sauce and lightly whisk until incorporated

Bechamel is a more universal first sauce.


OK, yeah, that's accurate. I did show them bechamel first because of the family mac-n-cheeses recipe.  It's been a while and I'm still on only my second cup of coffee today.

/time to switch to whisky, before my last phone meeting of the day
 
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