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(The Atlantic)   This is how much it takes to convict an officer of misconduct   ( theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Plea, Gun Trace Task, Trace Task Force, Task Force convictions, Baltimore, Police, Baltimore Police Department, Task Force case  
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9327 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Feb 2018 at 2:53 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-13 10:33:11 PM  
So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.
 
2018-02-13 11:59:55 PM  
The only way for an American police officer to be summarily terminated is to refuse to shoot a black man in cold blood.
 
2018-02-14 02:42:16 AM  
Michael Dorner tried to warn us.
 
2018-02-14 02:59:11 AM  

Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.


Why do you hate capitalism?
 
2018-02-14 03:02:39 AM  
The only times I've seen police get substantially punished in any form are:

A) If they actively decide NOT to shoot someone or otherwise try to be a decent human being
B) If they inconvenience, annoy, or harm rich white people.
 
2018-02-14 03:05:23 AM  

MikeyFuccon: The only way for an American police officer to be summarily terminated is to refuse to shoot a black man in cold blood.


I do believe this has actually happened a few times in the past several years. Guy recruited from the military into the police, and having training dealing with de-escalating tense situations (the US military has faaaar more training in this regard than any US PD), in a standoff situation instead of shooting someone forces his "fellow" officers to calm the fark down, resulting in the arrest with no injuries of a suspect instead of a fatal shooting.

What happens? He gets fired a week later for "conduct unbecoming" or some such shiat.
 
2018-02-14 03:06:38 AM  
FTA

What lessons do the convictions in Baltimore teach about policing the police? The glaring answer is that the American justice system sometimes puts property ahead of humanity. Steal a black life and you can get off in court; steal a couple hundred grand and the long arm of the law will come for you. It's hard to argue with this explanation, but there are more complex takeaways as well.

Reminds me of a story arc on the TV show "Jericho".
 
2018-02-14 03:14:20 AM  

bluejeansonfire: The only times I've seen police get substantially punished in any form are:

A) If they actively decide NOT to shoot someone or otherwise try to be a decent human being
B) If they inconvenience, annoy, or harm rich white people.


C) They try to steal from the other crooked cops
 
2018-02-14 03:18:31 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-14 03:42:30 AM  
Money is power. 

Black people tend to have no money. 

Black people have no power. 

Everyone knows how it works. The trick is actually changing it. Difficulty: you can't just make black people richer and magically make racism go away.
 
2018-02-14 03:50:57 AM  
I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.
 
2018-02-14 03:57:45 AM  

Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.


You can shoot white people too, if you're a cop.

As long as they're poor.
 
2018-02-14 03:59:43 AM  
The real takeaway of the article:

From the Justice Department report to the Gun Trace Task Force convictions, the federal government has proved an important force in police reform. But under Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the department has switched its focus, pulling back from accountability efforts and offering local law enforcement a more sympathetic hand. That probably isn't a good omen for future cases. If the police in the United States are to be reformed, the question of what crimes produce convictions is important, but so is the question of who is prosecuting the cases.

Easy come, easy go.
 
2018-02-14 04:36:11 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.


It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.
 
2018-02-14 04:41:39 AM  

ModernLuddite: Money is power. 

Black people tend to have no money. 

Black people have no power. 

Everyone knows how it works. The trick is actually changing it. Difficulty: you can't just make black people richer and magically make racism go away.


You do know that even rich black people are harassed by the cops? After all using your own words black people have no money, so how did they afford that expensive car?
 
2018-02-14 04:45:07 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.


I would think it's because they stole from the wrong people and no one cared about the other crimes that hey committed, but to teach them and anyone else who tried to skim off the top. If you get caught skimming from the bosses or wrong people all your previous crimes will be used to extend your sentence.
 
2018-02-14 04:46:20 AM  

dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.


So they didn pay it upward far enough.
 
2018-02-14 04:51:41 AM  
This happened in Baltimore? Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee​eit
/Fark I am disappoint
//seriously why does money have to be involved for the courts to get serious?
///(Whistles "Farmer in the Dell")
 
2018-02-14 05:26:34 AM  
hoodiowithtudio - //seriously why does money have to be involved for the courts to get serious?

I was trying to find that ending scene from 'Ruthless People' where Judge Reinhold drives off of the pier and the people all gather to point out how dangerous it is to try and save the poor guy... until money floats to the surface, then they all dive right in. However, your question answers itself... and that answer is The American Way! (some restrictions apply)
 
2018-02-14 05:44:35 AM  
Officers assigned to the unit robbed hundreds of thousands of dollars from drug dealers, pocketing the money. They targeted cars for searches based on makes and models, and stopped adult black men just for carrying backpacks. They drove at groups of men and detained anyone who ran. They bilked taxpayers by charging for fraudulent overtime.
 
2018-02-14 05:46:43 AM  

dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.


Yes, but I was figuring the feds prosecution was a weapon in this case.  Someone has to initially put it on their radar, etc. etc. most of the time.  And sometimes, if you've pissed off the wrong people, they'll be that someone.  You've usually got more than a few favors owed between the local power structure and the feds so... yeah.  It happens.  Did it this time?  I dunno.  But it kinda explains some oddities on this case.

/oddities in the sense that usually stuff like this doesn't result in heavy convictions
//not oddities in the sense that it should be weird or unusual - because it certainly should not.  Somewhat frighteningly - it is
///not that guy that screams, "PIGS!" on every reply in a cop thread - but still - it's ludicrously obvious to anyone with eyeballs that police misconduct is swept under the rug or wrist slapped wayyyyy more than makes sense
 
2018-02-14 05:58:16 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.

Yes, but I was figuring the feds prosecution was a weapon in this case.  Someone has to initially put it on their radar, etc. etc. most of the time.  And sometimes, if you've pissed off the wrong people, they'll be that someone.  You've usually got more than a few favors owed between the local power structure and the feds so... yeah.  It happens.  Did it this time?  I dunno.  But it kinda explains some oddities on this case.

/oddities in the sense that usually stuff like this doesn't result in heavy convictions
//not oddities in the sense that it should be weird or unusual - because it certainly should not.  Somewhat frighteningly - it is
///not that guy that screams, "PIGS!" on every reply in a cop thread - but still - it's ludicrously obvious to anyone with eyeballs that police misconduct is swept under the rug or wrist slapped wayyyyy more than makes sense


The DEA started the case initially because one of the officers was protecting one his drug dealers. Then the officer was caught on wire taps bragging about all the illegal shiat that he and his fellow gang members were doing. It balloned from there. I am not saying that some score settling was not involved, but the official story is that the cops were being so flagrant that the DEA noticed and then phone surveillance roped in the whole task force. Regardless, I am just glad these assholes are facing decades in prison.
 
2018-02-14 06:15:03 AM  

dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.

Yes, but I was figuring the feds prosecution was a weapon in this case.  Someone has to initially put it on their radar, etc. etc. most of the time.  And sometimes, if you've pissed off the wrong people, they'll be that someone.  You've usually got more than a few favors owed between the local power structure and the feds so... yeah.  It happens.  Did it this time?  I dunno.  But it kinda explains some oddities on this case.

/oddities in the sense that usually stuff like this doesn't result in heavy convictions
//not oddities in the sense that it should be weird or unusual - because it certainly should not.  Somewhat frighteningly - it is
///not that guy that screams, "PIGS!" on every reply in a cop thread - but still - it's ludicrously obvious to anyone with eyeballs that police misconduct is swept under the rug or wrist slapped wayyyyy more than makes sense

The DEA started the case initially because one of the officers was protecting one his drug dealers. Then the officer was caught on wire taps bragging about all the illegal shiat that he and his fellow gang members were doing. It balloned from there. I am not saying that some score settling was not involved, but the official story is that the cops were being so flagrant that the DEA noticed and then phone surveillance roped in the whole task force. Regardless, I am just glad these assholes are facing decades in prison.


The fact that they are not facing death sentences is proof of the fact that the USA doesn't have a justice system.
 
2018-02-14 06:20:34 AM  

Inebriated Bolshevik Muppet: dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.

Yes, but I was figuring the feds prosecution was a weapon in this case.  Someone has to initially put it on their radar, etc. etc. most of the time.  And sometimes, if you've pissed off the wrong people, they'll be that someone.  You've usually got more than a few favors owed between the local power structure and the feds so... yeah.  It happens.  Did it this time?  I dunno.  But it kinda explains some oddities on this case.

/oddities in the sense that usually stuff like this doesn't result in heavy convictions
//not oddities in the sense that it should be weird or unusual - because it certainly should not.  Somewhat frighteningly - it is
///not that guy that screams, "PIGS!" on every reply in a cop thread - but still - it's ludicrously obvious to anyone with eyeballs that police misconduct is swept under the rug or wrist slapped wayyyyy more than makes sense

The DEA started the case initially because one of the officers was protecting one his drug dealers. Then the officer was caught on wire taps bragging about all the illegal shiat that he and his fellow gang members were doing. It balloned from there. I am not saying that some score settling was not involved, but the official story is that the cops were being so flagrant that the DEA noticed and then phone surveillance roped in the whole task force. Regardless, I am just glad these assholes are facing decades in prison.

The fact that they are not facing death sent ...


If we cant execute child rapists then there is no legal way we can execute corrupt officials. You can blame SCOTUS for ensuring that only murders get the needle.
 
2018-02-14 06:51:52 AM  
Randy Newman - Baltimore
Youtube _TvDge63Iy8
 
2018-02-14 07:03:37 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Michael Dorner tried to warn us.


He is an honorable warrior.
 
2018-02-14 07:24:52 AM  

Smoking GNU: MikeyFuccon: The only way for an American police officer to be summarily terminated is to refuse to shoot a black man in cold blood.

I do believe this has actually happened a few times in the past several years. Guy recruited from the military into the police, and having training dealing with de-escalating tense situations (the US military has faaaar more training in this regard than any US PD), in a standoff situation instead of shooting someone forces his "fellow" officers to calm the fark down, resulting in the arrest with no injuries of a suspect instead of a fatal shooting.

What happens? He gets fired a week later for "conduct unbecoming" or some such shiat.


I believe it was something along the lines of putting his fellow officers in "jeopardy" by de-escalating the situation and not taking the shot.
 
2018-02-14 07:33:36 AM  

Barricaded Gunman: AverageAmericanGuy: Michael Dorner tried to warn us.

He is an honorable warrior.


Wild applaus.gif .  With great honor, as befits an officer who died on Khittomer.
 
2018-02-14 07:46:59 AM  

Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal


That's an intentionally broad and unqualified statement. It's perfectly acceptable to steal from racial undesirables as long as you spread kickbacks up the chain.
 
2018-02-14 08:21:27 AM  

cman: The glaring answer is that the American justice system sometimes puts property ahead of humanity. Steal a black life and you can get off in court; steal a couple hundred grand and the long arm of the law will come for you.


Capone finally got nailed for failing to pay his taxes.

It's just easier to convict people for property crimes.
 
2018-02-14 08:26:06 AM  

cman: You can blame SCOTUS for ensuring that only murders get the needle.


Actually, we still have the death penalty for a non-murder offense.

Treason, constitutionally, was up to Congress to set punishment for. They chose death. That was used as a reasoning for why the death penalty was constitutional. Thus, you can be put to death for a non-murderous crime.
 
2018-02-14 08:26:43 AM  

bluejeansonfire: The only times I've seen police get substantially punished in any form are:

A) If they actively decide NOT to shoot someone or otherwise try to be a decent human being
B) If they inconvenience, annoy, or harm rich white people.


I can't recall any time a cop has gotten in trouble for not shooting someone.
 
2018-02-14 08:32:32 AM  
Should have been brought up on RICO charges. That would have been so suave.
 
2018-02-14 08:34:53 AM  

dsmith42: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: I really sorta hate myself for being a cynical fark atm, but I can't help but wonder how much of this conviction is because those in the local power structure are pissed that they didn't get their cut.  No one likes an outside operator making bank in their territory without a piece of the action.  Would explain a certain lack of the usual full court press you get from the police unions etc. on a case like this.

It was a federal prosecution. The local power structure was not involved.


"Don't steal - the government hates competition."
 
2018-02-14 08:40:39 AM  

OldJames: bluejeansonfire: The only times I've seen police get substantially punished in any form are:

A) If they actively decide NOT to shoot someone or otherwise try to be a decent human being
B) If they inconvenience, annoy, or harm rich white people.

I can't recall any time a cop has gotten in trouble for not shooting someone.


It's been brought up a lot, and in this thread, but here you go:

Officer fired for not shooting
 
2018-02-14 08:50:39 AM  

LoneVVolf: Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

That's an intentionally broad and unqualified statement. It's perfectly acceptable to steal from racial undesirables as long as you spread kickbacks up the chain.


That's what I was going to say.   What matters is WHO you steal from.    I only skimmed the article and didn't see who they were racketeering from, someone mentioned other cops above.   There was also the Capone example, if the primary target wasn't the issue, then stealing from the government would make a federal case of it.
 
2018-02-14 08:51:57 AM  

punkwrestler: ModernLuddite: Money is power. 

Black people tend to have no money. 

Black people have no power. 

Everyone knows how it works. The trick is actually changing it. Difficulty: you can't just make black people richer and magically make racism go away.

You do know that even rich black people are harassed by the cops? After all using your own words black people have no money, so how did they afford that expensive car?


You're not a smart man if you think 'tend to' results in an absolute.
 
2018-02-14 08:54:50 AM  
We need real, empowered, independent oversight of police departments.

There's a passage from Thud that often springs to mind when I read about police misconduct and such:

'Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? Your grace.'
'I know that one,' said Vimes.  Who watches the watchmen?  Me, Mr Pessimal.'
'Ah, but who watches you, your grace?' said the inspector, with a brief smile.
'I do that too.  All the time,' said Vimes.

And, in the book, that is indeed an acceptable answer.  Because it's Sam Vimes giving it.

But it is only an acceptable answer when it's Sam Vimes giving it.  He's a paragon; an idealized fictional creation.  Here on the roundworld, we need real, proper oversight.
 
2018-02-14 08:56:58 AM  
Just a thought, if you want to see a good film about corruption, take a look at Prince of the City. A cop turns state's evidence it's, for wont of another term, expensive and the victories nebulous.
Prince of the City (1981) - Raf Alvarez gets Indicted
Youtube AIaKFOtLWd8
 
2018-02-14 09:29:38 AM  
If you did all that, the papers wouldn't be calling it "misconduct."
 
2018-02-14 09:42:00 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Michael Dorner tried to warn us.


Who is Michael Dorner?
Is he any relation to Christopher Dorner? The guy the cops burned alive for turning on them?
 
2018-02-14 09:57:57 AM  

Barricaded Gunman: AverageAmericanGuy: Michael Dorner tried to warn us.

He is an honorable warrior.


Username checks out.
 
2018-02-14 10:30:02 AM  

PlaidJaguar: We need real, empowered, independent oversight of police departments.

There's a passage from Thud that often springs to mind when I read about police misconduct and such:

'Quis custodiet ipsos custodies? Your grace.'
'I know that one,' said Vimes.  Who watches the watchmen?  Me, Mr Pessimal.'
'Ah, but who watches you, your grace?' said the inspector, with a brief smile.
'I do that too.  All the time,' said Vimes.

And, in the book, that is indeed an acceptable answer.  Because it's Sam Vimes giving it.

But it is only an acceptable answer when it's Sam Vimes giving it.  He's a paragon; an idealized fictional creation.  Here on the roundworld, we need real, proper oversight.


At this point, I'd kinda be happy for Vetinari to take over, and having a true honest copper like Vimes would be a pleasure.

/ Truth, Justice, Freedom, Reasonably-Priced Love and a Hard-Boiled Egg!
 
2018-02-14 11:17:13 AM  
Well, first of all, it helps if the officers are black or Latino.
 
2018-02-14 12:29:08 PM  

Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-14 01:40:58 PM  

Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.


Not from the rich, at least.
 
2018-02-14 02:02:54 PM  
Higher up's not getting their cut.
 
2018-02-14 02:33:19 PM  

lilbjorn: Donald Trump's Vagina: So it's ok to kill un-armed 'racially undesirables' but just don't steal

Gotcha.

Not from the rich, at least.


That's sort of the thing.  Kicking the crap out of some brown kids is oppressing those of lower status.  Wage padding is stealing from your betters.

Whatever it takes, but the BPD killed Sean Suiter.
 
2018-02-14 05:13:15 PM  

ModernLuddite: Money is power. 

Black people tend to have no money. 

Black people have no power. 

Everyone knows how it works. The trick is actually changing it.


Too bad nobody listened when Bernie Sanders was saying that during the last primary.  We might not have an Orange Menace in the White House right now.
 
2018-02-14 06:03:32 PM  

Z-clipped: ModernLuddite: Money is power. 

Black people tend to have no money. 

Black people have no power. 

Everyone knows how it works. The trick is actually changing it.

Too bad nobody listened when Bernie Sanders was saying that during the last primary.  We might not have an Orange Menace in the White House right now.


Yes, because the voters who put Trump in the White House would vote for someone who openly called themself a Democratic SOCIALIST
 
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