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(Lifehacker)   Oh, Fark. Yet another parenting advice article giving out...good information? We are truly in the darkest timeline. Because I used Purple   ( offspring.lifehacker.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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6387 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2018 at 10:20 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2018-02-09 10:30:15 AM  
14 votes:
img.fark.net

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2018-02-09 11:03:51 AM  
9 votes:
Are you kidding??? This is one of my favorite parts of parenting!

"How hot is the sun?"
"I'm not sure exactly. Let's look it up together."

"What's a barracuda?"
"A loooooong skinny fish with nasty teeth. Here's a picture; look at this thing! I'd hate to run into one of those in the ocean, wouldn't you?"

"Where's India?"
"Here it is on the globe, just south of China and Pakistan."

All from this week alone.
2018-02-09 10:25:37 AM  
9 votes:
I encourage my 10 year old to seek answers himself, and even when I'm providing information, I do it in the form of asking him questions.

Whenever I tell him to look something up on the Internets, I always ask, "How much of the Internet is lies?"
"About 90%," he replies.
"Okay. Carry on."
2018-02-09 11:26:40 AM  
8 votes:
Couldn't disagree with article more.

Kids don't have a friggin clue as to why the sky is blue and will not come up with the answer. Give them the correct answer and explain it so they can understand it. You will give them an appreciation for the world around them and a deeper knowledge and understanding of the world they live in. They will also know early on that even though things are complex that an answer is there.

This is one of my favorite parts of being a parent. If I don't know we look it up. Now my kids actually know how to look up things and how to dig deep for an answer. It often goes down rabbit holes of learning.

What kind of even CLOSE to correct answer do you think a kid will come up with for why the sky is blue? This isn't encouraging creativity. Kids are hungry for knowledge - don't hold it back FFS. Tell them why it's blue.
2018-02-09 10:32:58 AM  
8 votes:
Well, yes it's good for them to work out somethings, but at some point you have to intervene with the right information. A 5 year old is never going to figure out that air molecules scatter blue light more than other wavelengths.

Just don't be afraid to give them information that is over their heads. I always explain that just because you don't understand it now doesn't mean you'll never understand it. Thinking about stuff that's hard is like exercising your brain.
2018-02-09 10:28:23 AM  
6 votes:
If I asked my parents a question, I was told to, "look it up." I spent a lot of time reading and gaining knowledge. Kids have to learn to fend for themselves, of they will be led around by the nose and will grow up and elect the first idiot that comes along and does the thinking for them.
2018-02-09 10:53:26 AM  
5 votes:
My parents (especially my dad) did this and I am a better person for it.
The only downside is that I am now EVERYONE's go to for questions because not only do I know a ton from looking everything up, but I know how to easily find answers to things that I don't.
With the wife though every fifth or so question, I give the "gee, if only you had some sort of device in your hand right now that literally had access to the majority of the world's information so you could answer your own question..."
2018-02-09 10:45:53 AM  
5 votes:
Also, Calvin and Hobbes dad answers work as well:

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2018-02-09 10:30:55 AM  
5 votes:
Oh look an article where stupid people give stupid advice. Please, answer your children's questions. It's how they learn.
2018-02-09 12:01:36 PM  
4 votes:

dewihafta: Are you kidding??? This is one of my favorite parts of parenting!

"How hot is the sun?"
"I'm not sure exactly. Let's look it up together."

"What's a barracuda?"
"A loooooong skinny fish with nasty teeth. Here's a picture; look at this thing! I'd hate to run into one of those in the ocean, wouldn't you?"

"Where's India?"
"Here it is on the globe, just south of China and Pakistan."

All from this week alone.


Came here to say this. As a nanny, my favorite answers to any question was, "I have no idea, let's go try to see if we can figure it out" or "Well, I was told it's [whatever] but I've never actually checked for myself so why don't we do some research to see if that's true" and then we got to spend time together learning how to learn and learning to test received wisdom. I would never tell a child to go away if they had a question. They aren't looking for an answer, they are looking for a way into your world. It's one of the ways they use to build relationships and telling them to go away is akin to telling them you aren't interested in that relationship. 

Dismiss a child's curiosity and trust in you and you are only teaching them to be antisocial. Being solicitous of other people's expertise and opinions is one of the things that makes us engaged, empathetic, and enjoyable to be around.

My father used to tell us to go figure out things for ourselves and my mother used to take us to the library and help us find books that might help us get answers. One of them I avoided except for really shallow interactions and the other is the first person I go to when I need an answer to something I can't figure out on my own. She doesn't necessarily know the answer but she always helps me find it.

"I don't know, let's go see what we can find out" is one of the best preludes to a really meaningful and fun time with any kid. It's one of the greatest adventures you can have together.
2018-02-09 10:34:02 AM  
4 votes:
Love that virtually every article published on that site is a command: "Stop doing X/Y/Z". Whole lotta clickbait goin' on.
2018-02-09 10:33:50 AM  
4 votes:
Good advice, especially because a lot of the times, the parents give the wrong answers.  "Why is the sky blue daddy?"  "Because Jesus made it that way as a warning to the gay people honey."
2018-02-09 09:41:26 AM  
4 votes:
Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.
2018-02-09 11:51:45 AM  
3 votes:
As an uncle, rather than a parent, my job is to always give the wrong answer. I'm teaching them the value of skepticism.
2018-02-09 11:30:45 AM  
3 votes:
Dear Lifehacker.

Shut up.
2018-02-09 10:35:18 AM  
3 votes:
Tried this with my four-year-old the other day. She ended up debunking two of Newton's laws, so that's the last time we'll be trying out THAT life hack. In our house we obey the laws of thermodynamics, thankyouverymuch.
2018-02-09 09:53:35 AM  
3 votes:
Kids already know...

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2018-02-09 02:10:31 PM  
2 votes:
Of course, since I actually five a shiat about my daughter(And my stepsons when they were little), I don't use the "Fark off and figure it out for yourself, because I'm too busy" approach that everyone seems to thin is pure genius.

Instead, I talk to her about whatever her question is, explain the background she needs, look up examples, build from there. Next, I may show related items, maybe even tear something in the house apart to show her how it works. Then I follow up by going back to it when the opportunity arises down the road.

For example:
We get a monthly STEM project for her to work on called a 'Tinker Crate'. Her first one had all of the parts to make a Spin Art Machine, and I explained to her the basics of electricity, the concept of a switch, what resistors were, and how to tell them apart. I them went on to explain how electricity and magnetism were related. Next, we looked up videos of generators and motors, since they're the same basic thing, just connected differently. After that, i tore apart an old power brick that we had laying around, to show her how it used magnetic and electric fields to change the voltage to make the device work. I also told her how it changed the current from AC to DC.

After that, we put together her STEM project, and there was a small breadboard with a series of resistors, so she could change the voltage, and thereby change the speed at which the turntable would spin, thereby changing the spread of the paint being dropped on the spinning board.

Now, she's not going to remember all of this instantly, she's only 9, but it's going to be something that she can come back to as she works on other projects, and each time, a little more will stick.

And it only took about 2 1/2. Much better than telling her to go figure it out on her own. This is shiatty advice for parents who don't want to be bothered by their kids, or don't want to admit that they don't know something.
2018-02-09 12:06:42 PM  
2 votes:
tse2.mm.bing.netView Full Size

For answers to life's most important questions.
2018-02-09 10:59:13 AM  
2 votes:
Or, you could tell them to look it up, like my parents did. I didn't have no Google, either, it was the library or 20-year-old encyclopedias for us.
2018-02-09 10:45:13 AM  
2 votes:
Too much work. As long as you actually answer their questions and don't say "because I said so" or "because you don't want the chupacabra to get you," they should turn out all right.
d23 [BareFark]
2018-02-09 10:34:31 AM  
2 votes:

Frankly Speaking: Oh look an article where stupid people give stupid advice. Please, answer your children's questions. It's how they learn.


Especially if the kid is 5 or under.
2018-02-09 10:28:22 AM  
2 votes:
Why can't I eat gummy worms for breakfast?
FKCK YOU!!

Why are planets round?

GO FKCK YOUSELF

Why does your face look like that?
FKCK OFF YOU LITTLE shiat!!

/parenting, NAILED IT.
2018-02-09 10:24:50 AM  
2 votes:
The only right answer to "Why is the sky blue?" is "It's not."
2018-02-09 09:00:28 AM  
2 votes:
Take a look, it's in a book.
2018-02-09 07:51:58 PM  
1 vote:

xalres: big pig peaches: Well, yes it's good for them to work out somethings, but at some point you have to intervene with the right information. A 5 year old is never going to figure out that air molecules scatter blue light more than other wavelengths.

Just don't be afraid to give them information that is over their heads. I always explain that just because you don't understand it now doesn't mean you'll never understand it. Thinking about stuff that's hard is like exercising your brain.

This. My oldest is only 2 so I can't tell her to look things up yet. I try to make sure i actually know the answer before I tell her why things are the way they are. I freely admit when I don't know something and then I'll find a video on YouTube from a good source and we'll both learn something.

/just started going over the three states of matter with her, we'll see if it sticks.
//yes I know there are more, I'm keeping it simple.


My wife and I modeled "how to have an effective argument" in front of our toddler when we disagreed about whether to teach three states of matter or if I should start getting into plasma. So many birds with that stone!
2018-02-09 04:20:28 PM  
1 vote:

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


It doesn't.  It's slower in Northern Winter and faster in Northern Summer.
2018-02-09 02:19:54 PM  
1 vote:

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...


Haven't you ever looked at a globe, specifically, at the equator?   It's quite clear that there is a seam there.
2018-02-09 02:13:31 PM  
1 vote:

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...
2018-02-09 12:09:09 PM  
1 vote:

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


Is this a setup for a dad joke or do you actually think the rotation speed of the earth is variable?
2018-02-09 12:00:47 PM  
1 vote:

dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.


My parents did this a lot with me, as well. Although I think it was less because it is a good learning experience, and more because it was a good way to get me out of the "Why? Why? Why?" cycle.
2018-02-09 11:27:45 AM  
1 vote:

Burr: Also, Calvin and Hobbes dad answers work as well:
[img.fark.net image 600x190]
[img.fark.net image 600x189]
[img.fark.net image 600x190]
[img.fark.net image 600x194]
[img.fark.net image 600x427]
[img.fark.net image 600x423]


I was going to upload a link to that 4th one of yours, so I see my work is done...
2018-02-09 11:27:40 AM  
1 vote:

EmptyCup: Couldn't disagree with article more.

Kids don't have a friggin clue as to why the sky is blue and will not come up with the answer. Give them the correct answer and explain it so they can understand it. You will give them an appreciation for the world around them and a deeper knowledge and understanding of the world they live in. They will also know early on that even though things are complex that an answer is there.

This is one of my favorite parts of being a parent. If I don't know we look it up. Now my kids actually know how to look up things and how to dig deep for an answer. It often goes down rabbit holes of learning.

What kind of even CLOSE to correct answer do you think a kid will come up with for why the sky is blue? This isn't encouraging creativity. Kids are hungry for knowledge - don't hold it back FFS. Tell them why it's blue.


Most adults will give them the wrong answer.
2018-02-09 11:26:23 AM  
1 vote:
I begged for a computer in the 80s for the sole purpose of playing video games that I liked more than what was on Atari at the time.  For Christmas I got a Vic 20 with a cassette drive.  My father told me if I wanted to play games I had to write them myself.  So I learned how.

taadaa!
2018-02-09 11:23:48 AM  
1 vote:
Why parents just said "you'll understand when you'll be older"
2018-02-09 11:16:02 AM  
1 vote:
Depends on the question.
2018-02-09 10:47:58 AM  
1 vote:
My standsrd response set: because i said so; no; i dont know;  your mom.
2018-02-09 10:46:49 AM  
1 vote:
If a kid asks where rain comes from, I think a cute thing to tell him is "God is crying." And if he asks why God is crying, another cute thing to tell him is "Probably because of something you did."
2018-02-09 10:42:58 AM  
1 vote:

big pig peaches: Well, yes it's good for them to work out somethings, but at some point you have to intervene with the right information. A 5 year old is never going to figure out that air molecules scatter blue light more than other wavelengths.

Just don't be afraid to give them information that is over their heads. I always explain that just because you don't understand it now doesn't mean you'll never understand it. Thinking about stuff that's hard is like exercising your brain.


This. My oldest is only 2 so I can't tell her to look things up yet. I try to make sure i actually know the answer before I tell her why things are the way they are. I freely admit when I don't know something and then I'll find a video on YouTube from a good source and we'll both learn something.

/just started going over the three states of matter with her, we'll see if it sticks.
//yes I know there are more, I'm keeping it simple.
2018-02-09 10:41:00 AM  
1 vote:

Frankly Speaking: Oh look an article where stupid people give stupid advice. Please, answer your children's questions. It's how they learn.


Exactly! It's good for them to be inquisitive and it's good for you to have stuff to talk about with your kid.

emarche: Love that virtually every article published on that site is a command: "Stop doing X/Y/Z". Whole lotta clickbait goin' on.


You've been eating mayonnaise wrong all this time. Stop doing that.

Yeah, that shiat makes me a little slappy as well.
 
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