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(Lifehacker)   Oh, Fark. Yet another parenting advice article giving out...good information? We are truly in the darkest timeline. Because I used Purple   ( offspring.lifehacker.com) divider line
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6386 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2018 at 10:20 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-09 02:34:07 PM  

Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...

No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".


Well, the answer is basically "the wind".
 
2018-02-09 02:44:45 PM  
So by forcing my kid into an existential crisis I'm actually teaching him critical thinking skills? Somehow i don't think the Mrs is going to approve of my application of this knowledge.
 
2018-02-09 02:51:49 PM  

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...

No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".

Well, the answer is basically "the wind".


Why does a figure skater spin faster when (s)he pulls her arms and legs closer to the center of his/her body, and slow down when (s)he extends them away from it?
 
2018-02-09 02:53:41 PM  

Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...

No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".

Well, the answer is basically "the wind".

Why does a figure skater spin faster when (s)he pulls her arms and legs closer to the center of his/her body, and slow down when (s)he extends them away from it?


We must all conserve angular momentum -- it's the law! :)
 
2018-02-09 02:57:12 PM  
If you *can't* answer your kid's questions, then you should get off your damn phone, and go look it up with them, and show them how to look things up.
 
2018-02-09 03:00:26 PM  

Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...

No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".

Well, the answer is basically "the wind".

Why does a figure skater spin faster when (s)he pulls her arms and legs closer to the center of his/her body, and slow down when (s)he extends them away from it?


Because she still has the same amount of energy in her spin, but she is adjusting the amount of mass that the inertia affects. The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in. It's similar to things slowing down when falling through the air if they are more spread out(have more surface area), but not exactly that. That's just the closest analogue that I can think of for something that I understand, but wouldn't be able to explain exactly to a kid.
 
2018-02-09 03:03:38 PM  

sharpie_69: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...

No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".

Well, the answer is basically "the wind".

Why does a figure skater spin faster when (s)he pulls her arms and legs closer to the center of his/her body, and slow down when (s)he extends them away from it?

We must all conserve angular momentum -- it's the law! :)


Yes, and the closer to our axis of rotation we concentrate our mass, the more our angular speed increases. So, is there a significant part of the earth's mass that is closer to its center in the winter and farther from it in the summer?
 
2018-02-09 03:07:26 PM  

Mikey1969: The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in.


"The wind" is not the answer.  The large scale structure of the earth's atmospheric flow remains generally constant.
 
2018-02-09 04:10:25 PM  

Z-clipped: Mikey1969: The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in.

"The wind" is not the answer.  The large scale structure of the earth's atmospheric flow remains generally constant.


Actually, it is.
"It turns out that during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the winds - which are predominantly west to east - are stronger," Salstein said.
The more forceful winds double the angular momentum of the atmosphere. Angular momentum is a conserved quantity in nature - the example usually given is the spinning ice skater conserving angular momentum by speeding up when she brings her arms in.


https://www.livescience.com/178-spin-​e​arth-rotation.html

From year to year, winds and air pressure patterns change, causing different forces to act on the solid Earth. During El Niño years, for example, the rotation of the Earth may slow ever so slightly because of stronger winds, increasing the length of a day by a fraction of a millisecond (thousandth of a second).
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/​n​ews/topstory/2003/0210rotation.html

Thanks for playing, though. Love ya, mean it...
 
2018-02-09 04:20:28 PM  

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


It doesn't.  It's slower in Northern Winter and faster in Northern Summer.
 
2018-02-09 04:56:02 PM  

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in.

"The wind" is not the answer.  The large scale structure of the earth's atmospheric flow remains generally constant.

Actually, it is.
"It turns out that during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the winds - which are predominantly west to east - are stronger," Salstein said.
The more forceful winds double the angular momentum of the atmosphere. Angular momentum is a conserved quantity in nature - the example usually given is the spinning ice skater conserving angular momentum by speeding up when she brings her arms in.

https://www.livescience.com/178-spin-e​arth-rotation.html

From year to year, winds and air pressure patterns change, causing different forces to act on the solid Earth. During El Niño years, for example, the rotation of the Earth may slow ever so slightly because of stronger winds, increasing the length of a day by a fraction of a millisecond (thousandth of a second).
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/n​ews/topstory/2003/0210rotation.html

Thanks for playing, though. Love ya, mean it...


The effect accounts for only about 15% of the seasonal increase in angular speed.  The effect I'm referring to is more significant.

How many trees do you think are on the planet?
 
2018-02-09 05:19:26 PM  

Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in.

"The wind" is not the answer.  The large scale structure of the earth's atmospheric flow remains generally constant.

Actually, it is.
"It turns out that during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the winds - which are predominantly west to east - are stronger," Salstein said.
The more forceful winds double the angular momentum of the atmosphere. Angular momentum is a conserved quantity in nature - the example usually given is the spinning ice skater conserving angular momentum by speeding up when she brings her arms in.

https://www.livescience.com/178-spin-e​arth-rotation.html

From year to year, winds and air pressure patterns change, causing different forces to act on the solid Earth. During El Niño years, for example, the rotation of the Earth may slow ever so slightly because of stronger winds, increasing the length of a day by a fraction of a millisecond (thousandth of a second).
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/n​ews/topstory/2003/0210rotation.html

Thanks for playing, though. Love ya, mean it...

The effect accounts for only about 15% of the seasonal increase in angular speed.  The effect I'm referring to is more significant.

How many trees do you think are on the planet?


Less every day. Are you trying to imply that trees in the northern hemisphere losing their leaves in the winter is making the earth spin slower?
 
2018-02-09 05:48:07 PM  

xalres: /just started going over the three states of matter with her, we'll see if it sticks.


What, lying?

/I learned it from you!
 
2018-02-09 06:32:47 PM  

obenchainr:   It doesn't.  It's slower in Northern Winter and faster in Northern Summer.

I was going to say "yes, but let's assume for the sake of fun that it doesn't" but someone  felt the need to piss in the sandbox:

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Mikey1969: The winds around the earth cause the same effect, they add to the "size" of the earth and it's atmosphere, which slows them down like the skater when she extends her arms, and that subsides in the warm season for the northern hemisphere, so it's like the skater bringing her arms in.

"The wind" is not the answer.  The large scale structure of the earth's atmospheric flow remains generally constant.

Actually, it is.
"It turns out that during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the winds - which are predominantly west to east - are stronger," Salstein said.
The more forceful winds double the angular momentum of the atmosphere. Angular momentum is a conserved quantity in nature - the example usually given is the spinning ice skater conserving angular momentum by speeding up when she brings her arms in.

https://www.livescience.com/178-spin-e​arth-rotation.html

From year to year, winds and air pressure patterns change, causing different forces to act on the solid Earth. During El Niño years, for example, the rotation of the Earth may slow ever so slightly because of stronger winds, increasing the length of a day by a fraction of a millisecond (thousandth of a second).
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/n​ews/topstory/2003/0210rotation.html

Thanks for playing, though. Love ya, mean it...

The effect accounts for only about 15% of the seasonal increase in angular speed.  The effect I'm referring to is more significant.

How many trees do you think are on the planet?

Less every day. Are you trying to imply that trees in the northern hemisphere losing their leaves in the winter is making the earth spin slower?


No. I'm implying that, when all the various factors contributing to the variation in the Earth's angular speed (of which the interactions with atmospheric gases are only a small part) are accounted for, the final results are significantly and measurably affected by the change in moment of inertia caused by the vertical movement of water and biomass, to which - yes - the leaves, fruit, sap, and pine cones falling from the approximately 1.7 trillion deciduous and boreal trees (the vast majority of which are located in the northern hemisphere) along with some other perennial vegetation represents a large contribution.

I tried to state the question in a simple, straightforward way, so that it could be a fun thought experiment (along with a nice little Fermi problem sanity check at the end) because that kind of exercise is exactly what TFA is about.

Rather than stop and play a game for a minute, you went straight to Google and allowed your ego to rob you of the pleasure of solving a fun physics puzzle (as well as robbing you of your good manners, apparently).  So well done on your part, I guess.
 
2018-02-09 06:42:09 PM  
That's a good way to teach your kid not to bother talking to you.
My best trick was to answer my kid twice, once using some big words, then restating it with easy words. Saying it again with easy words.
 
2018-02-09 07:51:58 PM  

xalres: big pig peaches: Well, yes it's good for them to work out somethings, but at some point you have to intervene with the right information. A 5 year old is never going to figure out that air molecules scatter blue light more than other wavelengths.

Just don't be afraid to give them information that is over their heads. I always explain that just because you don't understand it now doesn't mean you'll never understand it. Thinking about stuff that's hard is like exercising your brain.

This. My oldest is only 2 so I can't tell her to look things up yet. I try to make sure i actually know the answer before I tell her why things are the way they are. I freely admit when I don't know something and then I'll find a video on YouTube from a good source and we'll both learn something.

/just started going over the three states of matter with her, we'll see if it sticks.
//yes I know there are more, I'm keeping it simple.


My wife and I modeled "how to have an effective argument" in front of our toddler when we disagreed about whether to teach three states of matter or if I should start getting into plasma. So many birds with that stone!
 
2018-02-09 07:56:09 PM  

EmptyCup: Couldn't disagree with article more.

Kids don't have a friggin clue as to why the sky is blue and will not come up with the answer. Give them the correct answer and explain it so they can understand it. You will give them an appreciation for the world around them and a deeper knowledge and understanding of the world they live in. They will also know early on that even though things are complex that an answer is there.

This is one of my favorite parts of being a parent. If I don't know we look it up. Now my kids actually know how to look up things and how to dig deep for an answer. It often goes down rabbit holes of learning.

What kind of even CLOSE to correct answer do you think a kid will come up with for why the sky is blue? This isn't encouraging creativity. Kids are hungry for knowledge - don't hold it back FFS. Tell them why it's blue.


The first step of the scientific method is hypothesis. I actually wish that someone had asked me these questions! For years I literally didn't understand the concept of a hypothesis because every question was answered by looking it up. I really though science was just collecting facts that we already knew. So. There IS a reason for it.

/you know and then guide your child after they form their hypothesis
//and encourage alternate theories
///and nudge them towards the right answer/research
 
2018-02-09 09:09:09 PM  

Solty Dog: If I asked my parents a question, I was told to, "look it up." I spent a lot of time reading and gaining knowledge. Kids have to learn to fend for themselves, of they will be led around by the nose and will grow up and elect the first idiot that comes along and does the thinking for them.


Eh, it's a balance. Some things they just don't know. I explained--and still explain--plenty of things to the kidlet, because she's not an adult, doesn't have the knowledge of an adult, and it's not fair to expect her to see me as nothing more than a glorified Eliza program. But I do certainly direct her to things she can study and learn from, and we've already started on critical thinking skills.
 
2018-02-10 12:46:36 PM  

dittybopper: darwinpolice: dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.

My parents did this a lot with me, as well. Although I think it was less because it is a good learning experience, and more because it was a good way to get me out of the "Why? Why? Why?" cycle.

Well, we kinda knew we'd only get one chance at it, and that once chance was like hitting the lottery, so we consciously made our best effort.

We succeeded beyond our wildest dreams, too, because he's now 14 and knows everything.  Just ask him.


Holy crap, that is an incredible story, and I'm so happy that it worked out the way it did for everyone involved.

...kinda wish you'd kept the name Boy Doe, though. :)
 
2018-02-10 04:25:54 PM  

obenchainr: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

It doesn't.  It's slower in Northern Winter and faster in Northern Summer.


This got a smart?   Don't they teach conservation of momentum these days?

/or that a standard day is constant (discounting geological periods of time) and consists of a full rotation of the earth around its axis
 
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