If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Lifehacker)   Oh, Fark. Yet another parenting advice article giving out...good information? We are truly in the darkest timeline. Because I used Purple   ( offspring.lifehacker.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

6387 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2018 at 10:20 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



120 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-02-09 11:06:03 AM  

Just another Heartland Weirdass: My standsrd response set: because i said so; no; i dont know;  your mom.no, i dont know your mom.


More fun if you adjust punctuation.
 
2018-02-09 11:09:42 AM  

emarche: Love that virtually every article published on that site is a command: "Stop doing X/Y/Z". Whole lotta clickbait goin' on.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:10:36 AM  
 
2018-02-09 11:16:02 AM  
Depends on the question.
 
2018-02-09 11:23:48 AM  
Why parents just said "you'll understand when you'll be older"
 
2018-02-09 11:26:23 AM  
I begged for a computer in the 80s for the sole purpose of playing video games that I liked more than what was on Atari at the time.  For Christmas I got a Vic 20 with a cassette drive.  My father told me if I wanted to play games I had to write them myself.  So I learned how.

taadaa!
 
2018-02-09 11:26:40 AM  
Couldn't disagree with article more.

Kids don't have a friggin clue as to why the sky is blue and will not come up with the answer. Give them the correct answer and explain it so they can understand it. You will give them an appreciation for the world around them and a deeper knowledge and understanding of the world they live in. They will also know early on that even though things are complex that an answer is there.

This is one of my favorite parts of being a parent. If I don't know we look it up. Now my kids actually know how to look up things and how to dig deep for an answer. It often goes down rabbit holes of learning.

What kind of even CLOSE to correct answer do you think a kid will come up with for why the sky is blue? This isn't encouraging creativity. Kids are hungry for knowledge - don't hold it back FFS. Tell them why it's blue.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:40 AM  

EmptyCup: Couldn't disagree with article more.

Kids don't have a friggin clue as to why the sky is blue and will not come up with the answer. Give them the correct answer and explain it so they can understand it. You will give them an appreciation for the world around them and a deeper knowledge and understanding of the world they live in. They will also know early on that even though things are complex that an answer is there.

This is one of my favorite parts of being a parent. If I don't know we look it up. Now my kids actually know how to look up things and how to dig deep for an answer. It often goes down rabbit holes of learning.

What kind of even CLOSE to correct answer do you think a kid will come up with for why the sky is blue? This isn't encouraging creativity. Kids are hungry for knowledge - don't hold it back FFS. Tell them why it's blue.


Most adults will give them the wrong answer.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:45 AM  

Burr: Also, Calvin and Hobbes dad answers work as well:
[img.fark.net image 600x190]
[img.fark.net image 600x189]
[img.fark.net image 600x190]
[img.fark.net image 600x194]
[img.fark.net image 600x427]
[img.fark.net image 600x423]


I was going to upload a link to that 4th one of yours, so I see my work is done...
 
2018-02-09 11:30:45 AM  
Dear Lifehacker.

Shut up.
 
2018-02-09 11:31:32 AM  
My standard response
Bring me a beer then go ask your mother
 
2018-02-09 11:34:16 AM  

steelydanfan: [img.fark.net image 154x54]

[img.fark.net image 215x234]


You do of course realize that "LIFEHACKER" is an anagram of "CHARLIE FLEK", right?

Obviously a reference to Bela's lesser known younger brother.
 
2018-02-09 11:35:41 AM  
1. If your toddler is asking you "why" over and over they are farking with you.  You are a bad parent and should feel bad.

2. No one really knows why the sky is blue.  I was told in grade school it was reflecting the ocean. For years I would stare at the bath tub and try to figure out why the water was blue.

3. Ya if you actually know the answer, try giving the correct answer.
 
2018-02-09 11:38:58 AM  
Dad? Why is the sky blue?
- When the dinosaurs died, their blood turned to steam, and dinosaur blood was blue.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:46:32 AM  
Michelle Woo advises parents well.  As soon as possible, humiliate and frustrate the darlings as Socrates did by answering questions with further questions.  Parental obstinate refusal to empathize  with the child or address concerns can be taught early.  Provide a footstool so that they can access the range top for their own meals to answer the question, "What will we have for dinner?"

Children do well enough on their own by getting advice from friends on which drugs are cool, ethnic groups should be exterminated, or day of the week that won't result in a pregnancy.  All parents fail their children:  Why wait?
 
2018-02-09 11:51:24 AM  

Frankly Speaking: Oh look an article where stupid people give stupid advice. Please, answer your children's questions. It's how they learn.


It's how they learn facts (many of which are actually wrong).  It's not how they learn how to think and figure things out for themselves when you're not around.

No one is saying you shouldn't guide the process, or give them the information they need to come to a correct conclusion.

IHadMeAVision: Too much work. As long as you actually answer their questions and don't say "because I said so" or "because you don't want the chupacabra to get you," they should turn out all right.


Less work in the long run, since they come to you with fewer questions once they feel empowered to use their own brains.

guestguy: dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.

Yeah, but now he's super into shortwave radios...poor little fella  ( ._.)


And if you ask him how much he weighs, he gives you the answer in grains.
 
2018-02-09 11:51:45 AM  
As an uncle, rather than a parent, my job is to always give the wrong answer. I'm teaching them the value of skepticism.
 
2018-02-09 11:54:44 AM  
I do this at work all the time.

Peon: "what do I need to do before I leave for the day?"
Me: "What have you had to do every other day you've worked here? Do that."

...and it continues...

Dipshiat: "Well, I though you might want something else today."
Me: "Hmmm. Why don't you do something else, too. Pick something. Surprise me."
 
2018-02-09 11:57:38 AM  
Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?
 
2018-02-09 11:59:53 AM  
But... what if I'm able to give informed and educated answers on a wide variety of subjects?

And yes, I'm aware that English should not be one of those subjects, but bio, chem, math, history... we're good.
 
2018-02-09 12:00:47 PM  

dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.


My parents did this a lot with me, as well. Although I think it was less because it is a good learning experience, and more because it was a good way to get me out of the "Why? Why? Why?" cycle.
 
2018-02-09 12:01:36 PM  

dewihafta: Are you kidding??? This is one of my favorite parts of parenting!

"How hot is the sun?"
"I'm not sure exactly. Let's look it up together."

"What's a barracuda?"
"A loooooong skinny fish with nasty teeth. Here's a picture; look at this thing! I'd hate to run into one of those in the ocean, wouldn't you?"

"Where's India?"
"Here it is on the globe, just south of China and Pakistan."

All from this week alone.


Came here to say this. As a nanny, my favorite answers to any question was, "I have no idea, let's go try to see if we can figure it out" or "Well, I was told it's [whatever] but I've never actually checked for myself so why don't we do some research to see if that's true" and then we got to spend time together learning how to learn and learning to test received wisdom. I would never tell a child to go away if they had a question. They aren't looking for an answer, they are looking for a way into your world. It's one of the ways they use to build relationships and telling them to go away is akin to telling them you aren't interested in that relationship. 

Dismiss a child's curiosity and trust in you and you are only teaching them to be antisocial. Being solicitous of other people's expertise and opinions is one of the things that makes us engaged, empathetic, and enjoyable to be around.

My father used to tell us to go figure out things for ourselves and my mother used to take us to the library and help us find books that might help us get answers. One of them I avoided except for really shallow interactions and the other is the first person I go to when I need an answer to something I can't figure out on my own. She doesn't necessarily know the answer but she always helps me find it.

"I don't know, let's go see what we can find out" is one of the best preludes to a really meaningful and fun time with any kid. It's one of the greatest adventures you can have together.
 
2018-02-09 12:06:42 PM  
tse2.mm.bing.netView Full Size

For answers to life's most important questions.
 
2018-02-09 12:09:09 PM  

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


Is this a setup for a dad joke or do you actually think the rotation speed of the earth is variable?
 
2018-02-09 12:09:35 PM  
This approach may work with kids that aren't clever. My kid is a quick thinker, so I'll keep going with my solution...

Which is to give him a totally adult answer, sparing no detail, while the wife tries to say "he's only a kindergartener".

I don't even care how much he retains, it's about answering the next 20 questions all in one batch, as well as working on his ability to listen and retain more than a sound bite.

He's got an excellent memory, which also helps.

Was watching a car video when he was five, and it showed a retractable spoiler. He asked, "does that make it more aerodynamic"?

I explained to him that the cartoon that taught him the word was totally wrong in terms of what a spoiler did, and explained downforce. Good times.
 
2018-02-09 12:12:47 PM  

SuperChuck: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

Is this a setup for a dad joke or do you actually think the rotation speed of the earth is variable?


Not a joke.  Its rotational speed varies.  Measurably.  Can you figure out why?
 
2018-02-09 12:16:25 PM  

Z-clipped: SuperChuck: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

Is this a setup for a dad joke or do you actually think the rotation speed of the earth is variable?

Not a joke.  Its rotational speed varies.  Measurably.  Can you figure out why?


ha. ha.
 
2018-02-09 12:23:59 PM  

stuffy: [tse2.mm.bing.net image 475x102]
For answers to life's most important questions.


I made a redtube joke in mixed company the other day.   Two of the 20ish year old guys didn't know what it was but all the older adults (30-40) did.   Do kids not watch porn, or do they just go to obviously named sites like youpron?   I decided xnxx would be to obscure for the joke, but was surprised when anyone missed redtube.
 
2018-02-09 12:26:04 PM  

Sailing Starflower: Z-clipped: SuperChuck: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

Is this a setup for a dad joke or do you actually think the rotation speed of the earth is variable?

Not a joke.  Its rotational speed varies.  Measurably.  Can you figure out why?

ha. ha.


I'll give you a hint:

α = 𝛕 / I
 
2018-02-09 12:34:19 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 12:39:30 PM  
Better than my dad's approach, "Don't you KNOW this?" Or as an adult, him complaining that I didn't do something and should know better. Apparently, and I know this is shocking to some, but if you want your child raised a certain way it's up to YOU as a parent to ensure your child has certain knowledge or manners.
 
2018-02-09 12:42:40 PM  
SuperChuck:

Feel free to ask questions here instead of searching the web.  It's really quite a fun problem to work through, and even though it uses only basic concepts from high school physics it took my entire class of astrophysics majors a solid 30 minutes of playing question and answer with the professor to figure out.
 
2018-02-09 01:02:33 PM  

Z-clipped: SuperChuck:

Feel free to ask questions here instead of searching the web.  It's really quite a fun problem to work through, and even though it uses only basic concepts from high school physics it took my entire class of astrophysics majors a solid 30 minutes of playing question and answer with the professor to figure out.


Sorry, a quick & dirty google told me it has to do with ice and there being more of it in the northern hemisphere.

I was really hoping it was going to be a bad joke I could tell my kids ;}
 
2018-02-09 01:13:05 PM  

Z-clipped: SuperChuck: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

Not a joke.  Its rotational speed varies.  Measurably.  Can you figure out why?


I do not know if the above is correct and, in playing with the game will not google it, but I can make a non-google guess that several factors could come in to play.

I would guess that seasonal changes in moisture content an specific latitudes could account for some changes in angular velocity.

Also, the earth's orbit is not circular. As the earth moves in and out from the near and far points (forget the greek for this - parethon? anatheon? whatever) the tidal forces (ala towards tidal lock) that the sun has would change. I know the sun's tidal forces are small and distance in gravity matters so I do not know the math answer to how much of an effect this has.

Any other farkers know better?

Maybe I should ask my kids.
 
2018-02-09 01:14:23 PM  

SuperChuck: a quick & dirty google told me it has to do with ice and there being more of it in the northern hemisphere.


OR MAYBE it has to do with the smoother part of the turtle shell!
 
2018-02-09 01:24:09 PM  

SuperChuck: Sorry, a quick & dirty google told me it has to do with ice and there being more of it in the northern hemisphere.


That's not correct.
 
2018-02-09 01:26:16 PM  
There is a wonderful childrens book called, "Why?" By lindsey camp. A little girl asks Why all the time and saves the earth from alien invasion.
 
2018-02-09 01:46:08 PM  
I told my kid that there was this thing called sarcasm.  Defined it for him. And told him he was going to see a lot of it in life, so I was going to give him experience in it.

/so watch out kid
//promised to provide hints
 
2018-02-09 01:55:25 PM  

EmptyCup: Z-clipped: SuperChuck: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

Not a joke.  Its rotational speed varies.  Measurably.  Can you figure out why?

I do not know if the above is correct and, in playing with the game will not google it, but I can make a non-google guess that several factors could come in to play.

I would guess that seasonal changes in moisture content an specific latitudes could account for some changes in angular velocity.

Also, the earth's orbit is not circular. As the earth moves in and out from the near and far points (forget the greek for this - parethon? anatheon? whatever) the tidal forces (ala towards tidal lock) that the sun has would change. I know the sun's tidal forces are small and distance in gravity matters so I do not know the math answer to how much of an effect this has.

Any other farkers know better?

Maybe I should ask my kids.


Here's another hint:

ffden-2.phys.uaf.eduView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 02:06:04 PM  

Z-clipped: SuperChuck: Sorry, a quick & dirty google told me it has to do with ice and there being more of it in the northern hemisphere.

That's not correct.


Or, more accurately, while the long-term effects of ice melt due to global average temperature can and do affect the earth's rotation, the effects of seasonal polar ice melts are mostly mitigated by isostatic rebound of the south polar continent, and salt migration in the arctic.

The effect I'm asking about is more specific, more pronounced in the short-term, and more significant.
 
2018-02-09 02:10:31 PM  
Of course, since I actually five a shiat about my daughter(And my stepsons when they were little), I don't use the "Fark off and figure it out for yourself, because I'm too busy" approach that everyone seems to thin is pure genius.

Instead, I talk to her about whatever her question is, explain the background she needs, look up examples, build from there. Next, I may show related items, maybe even tear something in the house apart to show her how it works. Then I follow up by going back to it when the opportunity arises down the road.

For example:
We get a monthly STEM project for her to work on called a 'Tinker Crate'. Her first one had all of the parts to make a Spin Art Machine, and I explained to her the basics of electricity, the concept of a switch, what resistors were, and how to tell them apart. I them went on to explain how electricity and magnetism were related. Next, we looked up videos of generators and motors, since they're the same basic thing, just connected differently. After that, i tore apart an old power brick that we had laying around, to show her how it used magnetic and electric fields to change the voltage to make the device work. I also told her how it changed the current from AC to DC.

After that, we put together her STEM project, and there was a small breadboard with a series of resistors, so she could change the voltage, and thereby change the speed at which the turntable would spin, thereby changing the spread of the paint being dropped on the spinning board.

Now, she's not going to remember all of this instantly, she's only 9, but it's going to be something that she can come back to as she works on other projects, and each time, a little more will stick.

And it only took about 2 1/2. Much better than telling her to go figure it out on her own. This is shiatty advice for parents who don't want to be bothered by their kids, or don't want to admit that they don't know something.
 
2018-02-09 02:13:31 PM  

Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?


You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...
 
2018-02-09 02:18:39 PM  

dk47: No one really knows why the sky is blue.


Actually, yes, we do.
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raylei​gh​_scattering#Cause_of_the_blue_color_of​_the_sky

In fact, that was one of the questions that Cliff Stoll had to answer when he was taking his oral examination for his doctorate.
 http://www.passionmakes.us/2009/11/w​hy​-is-the-sky-blue/
 
2018-02-09 02:19:54 PM  

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...


Haven't you ever looked at a globe, specifically, at the equator?   It's quite clear that there is a seam there.
 
2018-02-09 02:20:01 PM  

Mikey1969: Z-clipped: Hey farkers,

Why does the Earth rotate more slowly around its axis in the summer (in the northern hemisphere) and more quickly in the winter?

You're telling me that half of the Earth rotates faster than the other half? Yeah, I am kinda keen to learn this one. Please proceed...


No.  I was just trying to preemptively answer the obvious first question "when it's winter, wheresmartass?".
 
2018-02-09 02:24:55 PM  

darwinpolice: dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.

My parents did this a lot with me, as well. Although I think it was less because it is a good learning experience, and more because it was a good way to get me out of the "Why? Why? Why?" cycle.


Well, we kinda knew we'd only get one chance at it, and that once chance was like hitting the lottery, so we consciously made our best effort.

We succeeded beyond our wildest dreams, too, because he's now 14 and knows everything.  Just ask him.
 
2018-02-09 02:27:32 PM  

guestguy: dittybopper: Actually this approach is what we took with the littlebopper.  Every single thing, no matter how mundane, was a learning experience.

Yeah, but now he's super into shortwave radios...poor little fella  ( ._.)


I *WISH*.  He's got precisely zero interest in ham radio.  Even a mild suggestion that he study for his Technician license, so that he can contact me while I'm out and about, is met with contempt.
 
2018-02-09 02:29:00 PM  
The best answer is always "google it"
 
2018-02-09 02:29:58 PM  

dittybopper: dk47: No one really knows why the sky is blue.

Actually, yes, we do.
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayleig​h_scattering#Cause_of_the_blue_color_o​f_the_sky

In fact, that was one of the questions that Cliff Stoll had to answer when he was taking his oral examination for his doctorate.
 http://www.passionmakes.us/2009/11/wh​y-is-the-sky-blue/


The natural follow-up is to argue philosophically about color realism vs. the subjectivity of color experience, and come to the conclusion that a specific wavelength of light doesn't have an inherent color attached to it.

Or conversely, to claim that the sky is only blue from one particular vantage point, and since it is alternatively black, red, orange, pink, (or invisible) from other vantage points, it is inherently none of those colors.
 
2018-02-09 02:33:04 PM  

Z-clipped: The natural follow-up is to argue philosophically about color realism vs. the subjectivity of color experience, and come to the conclusion that a specific wavelength of light doesn't have an inherent color attached to it.


This sort of thing is why philosophy should be banned.
 
Displayed 50 of 120 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report