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(TreeHugger)   At the end of the day Americans could eat healthier. They just don't want to   ( treehugger.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Nutrition, low-income households, food, hipster food towns, Musselshell County, immediate food environment, food desert, food preferences  
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2597 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2018 at 9:50 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-09 10:29:27 AM  

d23: Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

The problem in many urban areas it is NOT cheaper to eat fresh food because there is a huge cost to get to a grocery store.  Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.  So it's time and money to get a suburban grocery chain.


Even as an upper-middle class white guy with a car only goes to the grocery store once a week with a list and who produces a tiny amount of food waste (food waste is a killer on your budget) , I'd do better filling my cart with Lean Cuisine.
 
2018-02-09 10:31:04 AM  

Thingster: lilistonic: My middle daughter and her little family stayed with us last week. They are vegetarian and sometimes vegan, so I made sweet potato and barley stew, and other such things, and that was fine for the week. But after they left, I cooked 10 lbs of pork shoulder and divided it for carnitas and pulled pork sandwiches for the rest of us to enjoy for a few days.

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle. But I don't think I'd enjoy life as much without ceviche, sashimi, carpaccio, and crudo when I can get those, and sometimes lovely chunks of tender delicious pork. And eggs, lots of eggs. I tend to crave foods with lots of B12, but I don't have the enzyme to digest it so I have to have shots or tablets.

Anyway. I just think we need to strive for balance for our individual needs. I think for most people it feels unnatural to eliminate huge swathes of food, and also cook so many different things than they adapted to throughout life, so they go for what's easiest. My upbringing was a little unusual for the time and place, and I was exposed to a broader variety of foods and cuisines than my peers, so some of the food challenges are easier for me. As I age, I still want to retain as wide a variety as possible, but it does require time and energy (or else having a great deal of money) to do it healthfully all the time. I spend more money on less beef and chicken to have it come from good sources, and use smaller amounts in my cooking. Etcetera.

To go along with this, it isn't that expensive to eat healthy *if* (big if) you have the money to do things like buy whole cuts of meat and know how to divide, and know what to do with it (which the article definitely addressed, which was a nice change from typical food access articles).

The local store sells boneless half shoulders or steaks for around $5/lb, but bone in whole shoulders for $1.10/lb.  So if all you have is $5 you get a pork steak tha ...


You are so so right. I had six kids, and it took a long time to learn just how to carve up the budget to buy in bulk. We had a mantra for years: you gotta have money to save money. But it is one of the goals worth working for, when possible. Getting my large slow cooker was super exciting for me, and I started buying the Costco membership with part of the IRS refund, to use for large cuts of meat that I'd bring home and section into ziploc bags, and also big bags of potatoes, onions, oranges, etc., and large boxes of decent quality cereal.

Then I had to readjust to cooking for fewer and fewer over the years...:-)
 
2018-02-09 10:34:47 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.


All of my math involves bulk and sale and leftovers.  I'm not some amateur farking around here.  I put work into this.  I know what you're saying sounds true.  It's what everyone says, especially young people, but if you work on the meal price per person - actually sit down and run numbers -  with bulk and with leftovers (I have two double-night meals planned next week one of which involves a slow-cooker) and the dollar menu starts to look really appealing.

My grocery list for tomorrow's shopping trip is already done and it gets me through the next Friday night.
 
2018-02-09 10:35:11 AM  
Between prescription addictions, alcoholism, illegal drug addictions, and overeating, it's obvious Americans are in a lot of psychic pain. Eating healthily doesn't reduce psychic pain (my depressed Californian brother eats about 4,000 healthy calories a day), but working on resolving psychological issues can result in the desire to eat healthier, bc you're not eating emotions anymore, you're eating food. Main problem: resolving psych issues is one of the most difficult undertakings in the human experience.
 
2018-02-09 10:35:25 AM  

togaman2k: Between TV/billboard advertising being exclusively fatty/salty/sugary crap and a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods in addition to the billions of dollars of government subsidies for fatty/salty/sugary input components - it's not that hard to see that our food economy is weighted heavily toward the worst foods for us.  It's called the "Standard American Diet" for a reason.

It's not hard to go shopping for fruits/vegetables/beans/nuts, but given the choice between a green salad with rice/bean bowl for dinner and that frozen DiGiorno pizza that was BOGO, it's easier to throw the pizza in the oven than take 30-45 minutes to prepare a wholesome meal. I pass at least 20 restaurants/fast food places in 5 miles from picking up my kid from daycare to home. Most nights, instead of fighting to keep him entertained and out of my hair while I prep a healthy dinner, it's much easier to get takeout on the way home.


100% honesty time - as long as bad food tastes better, it will beat free healthy food 8/10 times.
 
2018-02-09 10:36:23 AM  

Mike_LowELL: togaman2k: a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods

Careful there, I was informed humans are blank canvases who have been failed by society.  Don't you go toutin' them ganetic perdisposition's!


Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bliss_p​o​int_(food)

AdamK: SaladMonkey: I was about to go on a rant about the article missing the obvious point, but then I found it, so kudos to the author:

If health care providers, teachers, legislators, and insurance companies want to see a significant uptick in Americans' health -- and it is in everyone's best interest to work toward this -- then low-income individuals must be taught how to prepare food from scratch. In doing so, they'll learn how to take advantage of the many ingredients available to them. Without those practical tools, it's unrealistic to expect households to wean themselves off a heavily-processed diet.

Processed food is easy and delicious.  Fresh food is hard, and bland unless you do it right (in which case it is much much better than processed).

Processed meals are tasty if you like the taste of sodium and sugar, if for whatever reason those two don't light your world on fire then they're actually pretty bland a lot of the time. Since i've been making my own meals i've fallen out of love of sugar altogether, it tastes weird to me now.


People develop a tolerance for the taste of salt/fat/sugar. I'm much more sensitive to the taste of salt and sugar now that I cook for myself and don't drink soda.
 
2018-02-09 10:37:39 AM  

SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?


I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.
 
2018-02-09 10:38:08 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

All of my math involves bulk and sale and leftovers.  I'm not some amateur farking around here.  I put work into this.  I know what you're saying sounds true.  It's what everyone says, especially young people, but if you work on the meal price per person - actually sit down and run numbers -  with bulk and with leftovers (I have two double-night meals planned next week one of which involves a slow-cooker) and the dollar menu starts to look really appealing.

My grocery list for tomorrow's shopping trip is already done and it gets me through the next Friday night.


I've done the exact same as you, and honestly the fast food just does not work out to be cheaper when you factor in how much fast food you need to eat to feel full. You need about four of the dollar items to make a meal, wheras I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.
 I don't know what the difference is in our methods, but in my case there was zero doubt the healthy stuff ended up being cheaper.
 
2018-02-09 10:39:48 AM  

Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

My two favorite activities are cooking and saving money (what an exciting life I lead).  Anyway, I only cook from scratch (canned beans counts although dried are cheaper and better),  I only buy meat on sale, and I challenge myself to make vegetarian meals without cheese for two nights a week (because cheese is cheating), and even then the math works out that it would be cheaper to just buy frozen pizzas.

I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

For reference, I frequently use this website in the hunt for cheap meals.  https://www.budgetbytes.com/   Even for chicken and pasta with vegetables you come out worse than Stouffers frozen lasagna and that's not even counting the fact that some kind of processed food is always on sale in the freezer section.


Yes the $1 menu is cheaper and easier. Look if cheapEST and quickEST are a person's priorities than yes they should go do that.
That link you dropped is a great example of what I am talking about. Families can get nutrition on a tight budget if they put the time and effort into it just as you described with your personal example.
 
2018-02-09 10:41:39 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.


I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.
 
2018-02-09 10:44:24 AM  

DocTravesty: SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?

I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.


My parents eat their salad after the main course, and I just scratch my head. Eat the healthy stuff first, and you might not eat as much potato, hamburger, cheese, etc. Eating the salad after the really tasty stuff (I enjoy a good salad but when you're hungry it doesn't silence the growl the way heartier stuff does) just seems like doing penance after you've fully indulged in sin.
 
2018-02-09 10:45:40 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.


Yeah, I definitely believe there is something to that. Someone mentioned craving B vitamins, and I've found that I don't need to eat as much meat when I eat the grassfed stuff-- like, about half of what I would eat in a McDonald's burger,
 
2018-02-09 10:46:13 AM  

d23: Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

The problem in many urban areas it is NOT cheaper to eat fresh food because there is a huge cost to get to a grocery store.  Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.  So it's time and money to get a suburban grocery chain.


Ask your self why have the grocery stores moved out of urban areas?  Maybe  because they are not profitable?  Whose money do you propose to get a suburban grocery chain?  Some millionaire philanthropist?
 
2018-02-09 10:48:02 AM  

feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.


I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.
 
2018-02-09 10:48:36 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.


Yes - consuming sugar causes blood sugar spikes quickly followed by valleys (resulting in hunger), and fast food uses a ton of sugar, even where you would not expect it (http://www.businessinsider.com/sugar​-i​n-fast-food-2016-1 ) .  Healthy foods typically doesn't have as much sugar, or it is in a form that isn't as quickly absorbed, so you end up feeling satisfied longer.
 
2018-02-09 10:50:56 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.


And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.
 
2018-02-09 10:52:24 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.

And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.


You should look into soylent.
 
2018-02-09 10:53:31 AM  
Americans could eat healthier. They just don't want to

Look in the trash can of any public school cafeteria if you doubt that statement.
 
2018-02-09 10:54:01 AM  
At the end of the day when I'm drunk is no time to make healthy food choices
 
Ant
2018-02-09 10:54:55 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


I can't handle stuff like that anymore. There was a time when I would've thought that looked good, but now it just looks like heartburn and nausea. I actually find myself craving raw, crunchy vegetables nowadays!
 
2018-02-09 10:55:03 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.

And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.

You should look into soylent.


It's on the dollar menu.
 
2018-02-09 10:55:05 AM  
There was a pizza joint near my house.  Called Pizza Salad.   All organic,  non-GMO,  vegetarian.  Vegan and gluten-free options.   It's gone now.
 
2018-02-09 10:57:54 AM  
Habits die hard.  Almost nobody intentionally makes a healthy change to their diet unless they have a real medical reason to do so. (I have recently been making diet changes for medical reasons)

The food you eat affects your body in terribly subtle ways and you don't notice the effects until like two weeks later, or longer.  That's why dieting is so hard, even though the calories-in minus calories-out calculations are pretty elementary.  The human brain is wired to trust what it sees (and tastes!), overriding logic and reason.
 
2018-02-09 10:58:30 AM  
There is such emphasis on longevity in the N.A. society (and in the health care field) of today. Why? My theory that it is because we have developed such an all-consuming fear of dying. Why do I say that? Say what you will, but IMHO, it is in large part due to the breakdown of the nuclear family (and the abandonment of religious/spiritual beliefs). When you examine the present-day 'family' structure and contrast it with  what was the 'traditional' family structure where there were two or three generations in the same household, it becomes clear that there were benefits to the young generation in witnessing and experiencing firsthand the death of a grand parent or great grandparent. This then conditioned them to the reality of their own morbidity and mortality. Quality of life is so much more important than how long you 'survive'.
 
2018-02-09 11:00:22 AM  

d23: [img.fark.net image 404x402]

And I get to break out the best gif ever posted on Fark.


I always did admire a good ol'  left hand salute.
 
2018-02-09 11:06:17 AM  

Marksrevenge: DocTravesty: SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?

I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.

My parents eat their salad after the main course, and I just scratch my head. Eat the healthy stuff first, and you might not eat as much potato, hamburger, cheese, etc. Eating the salad after the really tasty stuff (I enjoy a good salad but when you're hungry it doesn't silence the growl the way heartier stuff does) just seems like doing penance after you've fully indulged in sin.


There's been a tradition of doing that in the past and in other places. I was told it helped cleanse the palate, and also aided digestion. But I don't know if the second part is real science or not. And of course, the palate-cleansing salad is probably pretty simple with just some fresh greens dressed lightly.
 
2018-02-09 11:06:37 AM  

EdAmesAndMrs.: There is such emphasis on longevity in the N.A. society (and in the health care field) of today. Why? My theory that it is because we have developed such an all-consuming fear of dying. Why do I say that? Say what you will, but IMHO, it is in large part due to the breakdown of the nuclear family (and the abandonment of religious/spiritual beliefs). When you examine the present-day 'family' structure and contrast it with  what was the 'traditional' family structure where there were two or three generations in the same household, it becomes clear that there were benefits to the young generation in witnessing and experiencing firsthand the death of a grand parent or great grandparent. This then conditioned them to the reality of their own morbidity and mortality. Quality of life is so much more important than how long you 'survive'.


It's not the fear of death that made me change my diet and exercise habits. It's the fear of life without quality. There's not much quality of life if you live the last 10 years you have with the after effects of a stroke. I watched my mother go through that. No thanks.
 
2018-02-09 11:10:15 AM  
I eat only 7 course meals.

A six pack and a bag of chips.
 
OOF
2018-02-09 11:11:31 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:12:03 AM  

Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.


Ain't THAT the truth.

I love, love, love salty foods.  Soy sauce?  POUR IT ON!  The hot curry that comes in a box and looks sorta like a candy bar?  MY FAVORITE.

But after I cut sodium out back in November, I'm right there with you.  Ate some food they served at the Legion one night and I couldn't believe how salty it was, despite the person who cooked it saying "I didn't put as much salt in as I usually do, there are salt shakers on the tables."

Another problem I had was chronic dehydration.  Too much salt plus chronic dehydration is a recipe for high blood pressure as your body will ditch potassium (regulates BP) and hang onto sodium.  You also might wind up with a kidney stone the size of a quarter that requires two rounds of ESWL to get rid of.  That really sucked.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2018-02-09 11:13:21 AM  

AugieDoggyDaddy: Ask your self why have the grocery stores moved out of urban areas? Maybe because they are not profitable? Whose money do you propose to get a suburban grocery chain? Some millionaire philanthropist?


I don't know what the fark you are talking about.   I didn't make a commentary on the stores moving out.

Oh... and good luck on your corporate worship.  I don't happen to put profit before everything.  Kay? Bye bye now.
 
2018-02-09 11:13:21 AM  

feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.


PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE
1/3 cup natural peanut butter
1/3 cup warm water
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 ½ teaspoons grated or minced ginger
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 teaspoons agave or honey
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce

https://www.thugkitchen.com/grilled_s​u​gar_snap_peas_with_peanut_dip_sauce

Just had to pass on.  Throw this on everything and anything and thank me whenever you're done NOM-ing.
 
2018-02-09 11:14:26 AM  
I don't really see the point of extending my life if I have to share the planet with the kinds of people that already infest it.
 
2018-02-09 11:15:08 AM  

Marksrevenge: That all said, there are healthy foods that are affordable. Brown rice, beans, eggs, frozen vegetables. Try eating those things if you're looking at the avocados and salads, thinking it's cheaper to just eat potato chips and hot dogs.


I love the steamer packs.  Pop em in the nucularwave for 5 minutes and bam, a big bowl of veggies.

And you are absolutely right about staples being affordable.  However you left off potatos ;-)
 
2018-02-09 11:19:15 AM  

Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.


Ditto to both of you. The amount of sodium (and in conjunction, sugar) in foods you don't expect them is mind-blowing once you start reading labels.

I now buy unsalted canned vegetables (of the few I buy/use), I buy unsalted broth, even my own canned vegetables I don't use salt in them. I've cut the amount of salt I actually use in my cooking way down, just salting my serving on my plate, and I don't miss it a lot of the time. But I find that when I do splurge on food, like pizza for instance, it's almost too salty to enjoy.

Honestly I rarely eat out because I find it more expensive than cooking at home, and I can't justify the expense for a single meal. For the $9 I spent at Wendy's for a chicken sandwich, fries, and drink that could buy me several days worth of fresh vegetables that go with the wild game meat I put in my freezer during the fall.

And not to be an elitist, as I do occasionally enjoy my box mac and cheese and ramen. Don't look at me like that, being pregnant has taught me that when so many of my favorite healthy foods are suddenly an anathema to my nose and taste buds, food is food. I just limit my portions and try to mix it with healthy things that don't make me want to vomit. :P
 
2018-02-09 11:19:35 AM  
Let me throw this theory out there:

Perhaps modern medicine has mitigated the effects of a poor diet, discouraging people to change their ways. Today if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc. you can take pills that are pretty effective at getting them under control. You don't really have to change what you eat.
 
2018-02-09 11:21:21 AM  
Is sugar good or bad? Is fat good or bad? Is coffee good or bad? Is wine good or bad? Red or white? Does organic make a difference? Should I eat meat? If so how much? Is the food pyramid accurate? What percentage of body fat is healthy? Are GMO foods heathy? Are supplemental vitamins worth it? How much water should I drink?

I got your study right here.
 
2018-02-09 11:25:39 AM  
EdAmesAndMrs.:

It's not the fear of death that made me change my diet and exercise habits. It's the fear of life without quality. There's not much quality of life if you live the last 10 years you have with the after effects of a stroke. I watched my mother go through that. No thanks.

Absolutely agree with you. People in their 40s with difficulties walking, gall bladder surgery, heart problems related to weight.
That is what I don't get about the whole "I want to eat what I want! Nobody lives forever!" crowd.
Its not like statistically you are healthy one day then the next you die.
You could have decades of suffering and terrible quality of life.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:08 AM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


I think it's more important to be healthy while alive than live long but face limitations on what you can do because you're unhealthy.

I know plenty of people who are overweight. In all likelihood they'll live long lives, but just walking a mile or two fatigues them. That's not a way to go through life.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:20 AM  

Poowaddins: Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.

Ditto to both of you. The amount of sodium (and in conjunction, sugar) in foods you don't expect them is mind-blowing once you start reading labels.

I now buy unsalted canned vegetables (of the few I buy/use), I buy unsalted broth, even my own canned vegetables I don't use salt in them. I've cut the amount of salt I actually use in my cooking way down, just salting my serving on my plate, and I don't miss it a lot of the time. But I find that when I do splurge on food, like pizza for instance, it's almost too salty to enjoy.

Honestly I rarely eat out because I find it more expensive than cooking at home, and I can't justify the expense for a single meal. For the $9 I spent at Wendy's for a chicken sandwich, fries, and drink that could buy me several days worth of fresh vegetables that go with the wild game meat I put in my freezer during the fall.

And not to be an elitist, as I do occasionally enjoy my box mac and cheese and ramen. Don't look at me like that, being pregnant has taught me that when so many of my favorite healthy foods are suddenly an anathema to my nose and taste buds, food is food. I just limit my portions and try to mix it with healthy things that don't make me want to vomit. :P


I like using this.  As something sprinkled on cooked food, meh, it tastes a little chemical-y.  Cooked into food, not so much.  And it has a shiatload of potassium.

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2018-02-09 11:30:15 AM  
I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4
 
2018-02-09 11:31:10 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


Because colorectal cancer sorta sucks, and nothing tastes so good that it's worth having to regularly dump out a colostomy bag?
 
2018-02-09 11:31:41 AM  

smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4


bucks, I would have bought it but not triple+ price.  /meh phone messed up //apologies for second post ///3s
 
2018-02-09 11:33:18 AM  
After switching to a low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet our grocery bill skyrocketed. Lots of fresh meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, and produce, no pasta and no bread. No junk food. It's about $200 a week for the both of us. And that's with me only really eating once a day. But we don't (and won't) have kids so we can afford it and I know for a fact I'm much healthier than I was- lighter too!
 
2018-02-09 11:36:14 AM  

Jadedgrl: After switching to a low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet our grocery bill skyrocketed. Lots of fresh meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, and produce, no pasta and no bread. No junk food. It's about $200 a week for the both of us. And that's with me only really eating once a day. But we don't (and won't) have kids so we can afford it and I know for a fact I'm much healthier than I was- lighter too!


Keto and Paleo can be quite expensive. Takes quite a bit more time to plan out cheap meals on these diets.
 
2018-02-09 11:39:23 AM  

feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.


And when you cook, cook a lot!
The weekend roasts can make lunches for the entire work week.
One of those big spiral hams once yielded 3 suppers of meat and 25 lunch-sized portions in baggies to pop into the freezer.  For the last few years - with less than, say, 5 times per year- I've taken my lunch to work from home.
I estimate that I saved AT LEAST $50 a week or so from buying lunches ($200 a month, $2,400 per year).
 
2018-02-09 11:39:39 AM  

smd31: smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4

bucks, I would have bought it but not triple+ price.  /meh phone messed up //apologies for second post ///3s


I know what you are talking about. I get there are extra costs but some of those pasta sauces are just ridiculous. I particularly hate the ones cashing in on the health crazes that has nothing to do with pasta sauce.
Wow your crushed tomatoes are gluten free and fat free!?!? Take my money!
 
2018-02-09 11:42:40 AM  
Also, I don't get where folks are whining about "If I ate rice, beans and veggies all the time, I guess it would be cheaper..."

Exactly how much diversity are you getting in your fast food diet?  A burger and a bun, with "potatoes" (fries) and maybe a wilted piece of lettuce now and then, is better, how?

All the stuff you use to shake it up with fast food (cheese, ketchup, seasonings) can be done with healthy food.
 
2018-02-09 11:42:59 AM  

SirEattonHogg: If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?


Foods I regularly crave: Salads.

Foods I never crave: Pizza.

/Pizza's just okay in my book.
 
2018-02-09 11:44:50 AM  
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