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(TreeHugger)   At the end of the day Americans could eat healthier. They just don't want to   ( treehugger.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Nutrition, low-income households, food, hipster food towns, Musselshell County, immediate food environment, food desert, food preferences  
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2593 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2018 at 9:50 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



172 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-02-09 08:38:35 AM  
As baffling as it may seem, their grocery decisions are not affected by improved access to fresh foods or more affordable prices because they're comfortable within their food culture.

I can't tell if this is sarcasm.  I don't find it baffling at all.
 
2018-02-09 08:44:56 AM  
Between TV/billboard advertising being exclusively fatty/salty/sugary crap and a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods in addition to the billions of dollars of government subsidies for fatty/salty/sugary input components - it's not that hard to see that our food economy is weighted heavily toward the worst foods for us.  It's called the "Standard American Diet" for a reason.

It's not hard to go shopping for fruits/vegetables/beans/nuts, but given the choice between a green salad with rice/bean bowl for dinner and that frozen DiGiorno pizza that was BOGO, it's easier to throw the pizza in the oven than take 30-45 minutes to prepare a wholesome meal. I pass at least 20 restaurants/fast food places in 5 miles from picking up my kid from daycare to home. Most nights, instead of fighting to keep him entertained and out of my hair while I prep a healthy dinner, it's much easier to get takeout on the way home.
 
2018-02-09 08:56:23 AM  
crow202.orgView Full Size

...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?
 
2018-02-09 09:16:35 AM  

togaman2k: a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods


Careful there, I was informed humans are blank canvases who have been failed by society.  Don't you go toutin' them ganetic perdisposition's!
 
2018-02-09 09:25:05 AM  
At the end of the day Americans could eat healthier. They just don't want to

maybe try in the morning then
 
2018-02-09 09:46:20 AM  
Gimme!

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 09:51:35 AM  

blatz514: Gimme!

[img.fark.net image 850x566]


I see all the food groups represented.  What's the problem?
 
2018-02-09 09:51:48 AM  
At the end of the day, I am hungry
 
2018-02-09 09:53:07 AM  
When watching food shows became a primary form of entertainment, you know this country was doomed.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2018-02-09 09:53:15 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


And I get to break out the best gif ever posted on Fark.
 
2018-02-09 09:54:57 AM  
"Points of view" are pretty amazing when you think about it. They can lead you to write all kinds of shiat.
 
2018-02-09 09:55:01 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


I don't know WTF that is but I want two of them - on that wonderful kitschy plate to boot!
 
2018-02-09 09:55:39 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


Please tell me there's a recipe for that monstrosity

Looks like a bacon explosion but filled with chili and mac and cheese
 
2018-02-09 09:56:55 AM  
I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.
 
2018-02-09 09:57:37 AM  
I quite like a nice salad.

/No croutons please
 
2018-02-09 09:57:41 AM  
No sh*t.  I live in a college town, which is affluent and well-educated.  And every time I go grocery shopping, I see people with shopping carts full of poor food choices.  Processed over fresh.  Junk food over healthy.

People like what they like, which is usually what they grew up with.  And because we've had an unhealthy diet for a couple generations now, what people grew up with is crap.
 
2018-02-09 09:59:03 AM  
It doesn't help that people are so fat nowadays that borderline morbidly obese people are considered "thin" and "healthy" because they're literally the thinnest people in the room.
 
2018-02-09 09:59:18 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


That is a salad, isn't it?
 
2018-02-09 10:00:40 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


Because eating some roughage every once in awhile helps you take some quality shiats?
 
2018-02-09 10:01:19 AM  

ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.


Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?
 
2018-02-09 10:02:40 AM  
A guy goes to his doctor and asks the Doc if he will live to be 100. The doc asks him "do you enjoy a good steak ?" Guy says "No, I never eat red meat".
The doc asks him if he enjoys a nice glass of scotch and a good cigar. The guy says "No, I never drink or smoke".
The doc asks him if he likes to chase lewd women. The guy says "No, of course not".
The doc then asked "Well then why the fark would you want to live to be 100?"
 
2018-02-09 10:02:52 AM  

Rapmaster2000: As baffling as it may seem, their grocery decisions are not affected by improved access to fresh foods or more affordable prices because they're comfortable within their food culture.

I can't tell if this is sarcasm.  I don't find it baffling at all.


It's almost like people buy stuff they like. It's weird.
 
2018-02-09 10:03:09 AM  
Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.
 
2018-02-09 10:04:16 AM  

Rapmaster2000: As baffling as it may seem, their grocery decisions are not affected by improved access to fresh foods or more affordable prices because they're comfortable within their food culture.

I can't tell if this is sarcasm.  I don't find it baffling at all.


Comfortable blog writer doesn't understand why people different than him choose differently.

It's very baffling to him.
 
2018-02-09 10:04:29 AM  
Why would I buy fresh healthy and expensive food when I can just hit up McDonalds for $5 and be nice and full, get fat, have a heart attack at 45, and make dirty vegans pay for my health care through taxes since I'm uninsured because the only job I can hold is working at walmart making just under the food stamp wage cap and then sell my food stamps for $5 and go to McDonalds and be nice and full, get fatter, and have another heart attack at 55?

/sorry for lack of punctuation
//didn't have enough room in my pockets today
///they're filled with cheeseburgers
////they're only a dollar!
//one slashy for each chin
 
2018-02-09 10:04:32 AM  
They could do that whole day
 
2018-02-09 10:04:47 AM  
could
 
2018-02-09 10:05:37 AM  
"Food desert" is one of those phrases that for me evokes mental images of liberal white people pulling their hair out going "why don't poor minorities want the same things I want!?" Another phrase that has the same effect on me is "Bernie Sanders."
 
2018-02-09 10:08:10 AM  
Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.
 
2018-02-09 10:08:14 AM  
I was about to go on a rant about the article missing the obvious point, but then I found it, so kudos to the author:

If health care providers, teachers, legislators, and insurance companies want to see a significant uptick in Americans' health -- and it is in everyone's best interest to work toward this -- then low-income individuals must be taught how to prepare food from scratch. In doing so, they'll learn how to take advantage of the many ingredients available to them. Without those practical tools, it's unrealistic to expect households to wean themselves off a heavily-processed diet.

Processed food is easy and delicious.  Fresh food is hard, and bland unless you do it right (in which case it is much much better than processed).
 
2018-02-09 10:08:36 AM  
Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.
 
2018-02-09 10:08:44 AM  

AngryDragon: blatz514: Gimme!

[img.fark.net image 850x566]

I see all the food groups represented.  What's the problem?


I don't see anything from the "dairy" group - needs some cheeze added
 
2018-02-09 10:09:09 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 10:10:43 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.


I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.
 
2018-02-09 10:11:27 AM  
I love how this story is sandwiched between a Lucky Charms and a nation pizza day thread.
 
2018-02-09 10:11:41 AM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


Your grandparents are genetic outliers.  Most people who have that sort of lifestyle meet their grave decades earlier.  And, while happy during mealtimes, are miserable overall due to diet-associated diseases like diabetes, blood-pressure, joint pain (and related mobility issues).

/not sure why you mentioned gambling.
 
2018-02-09 10:12:03 AM  

NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.


Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.
 
2018-02-09 10:12:06 AM  
My middle daughter and her little family stayed with us last week. They are vegetarian and sometimes vegan, so I made sweet potato and barley stew, and other such things, and that was fine for the week. But after they left, I cooked 10 lbs of pork shoulder and divided it for carnitas and pulled pork sandwiches for the rest of us to enjoy for a few days.

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle. But I don't think I'd enjoy life as much without ceviche, sashimi, carpaccio, and crudo when I can get those, and sometimes lovely chunks of tender delicious pork. And eggs, lots of eggs. I tend to crave foods with lots of B12, but I don't have the enzyme to digest it so I have to have shots or tablets.

Anyway. I just think we need to strive for balance for our individual needs. I think for most people it feels unnatural to eliminate huge swathes of food, and also cook so many different things than they adapted to throughout life, so they go for what's easiest. My upbringing was a little unusual for the time and place, and I was exposed to a broader variety of foods and cuisines than my peers, so some of the food challenges are easier for me. As I age, I still want to retain as wide a variety as possible, but it does require time and energy (or else having a great deal of money) to do it healthfully all the time. I spend more money on less beef and chicken to have it come from good sources, and use smaller amounts in my cooking. Etcetera.
 
2018-02-09 10:13:52 AM  
One thing I've become acutely aware of in the past few years is how geography and health are correlated. I grew up in Kansas and my family is from southern Indiana, two places where obesity is a visible obvious epidemic. Here in Colorado, obesity is the exception. My children have lived most of their lives in this culture, so when we travel, one the first things they notice is how fat the rest of the country is in comparison. Colorado grocery stores are filled with the same garbage as grocery stores in the rest of the country, and we have the same high-calorie restaurants as you'll find elsewhere. It just comes down to a different culture. We're not genetically superior in Colorado. A lot of us just choose to live healthy lifestyles.
 
2018-02-09 10:16:01 AM  

SaladMonkey: I was about to go on a rant about the article missing the obvious point, but then I found it, so kudos to the author:

If health care providers, teachers, legislators, and insurance companies want to see a significant uptick in Americans' health -- and it is in everyone's best interest to work toward this -- then low-income individuals must be taught how to prepare food from scratch. In doing so, they'll learn how to take advantage of the many ingredients available to them. Without those practical tools, it's unrealistic to expect households to wean themselves off a heavily-processed diet.

Processed food is easy and delicious.  Fresh food is hard, and bland unless you do it right (in which case it is much much better than processed).


Processed meals are tasty if you like the taste of sodium and sugar, if for whatever reason those two don't light your world on fire then they're actually pretty bland a lot of the time. Since i've been making my own meals i've fallen out of love of sugar altogether, it tastes weird to me now.
 
2018-02-09 10:17:48 AM  

mrsleep: You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


Absolutely. As long as you're prepared to accept the consequences that result from your lifestyle and make sure that your lifestyle doesn't affect other people.

/had a miserable 4 hour flight last week seated beside a 350+ pound woman so I'm a bit jaded about other people's "lifestyle choices" at the moment.
 
2018-02-09 10:18:18 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.


"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

My two favorite activities are cooking and saving money (what an exciting life I lead).  Anyway, I only cook from scratch (canned beans counts although dried are cheaper and better),  I only buy meat on sale, and I challenge myself to make vegetarian meals without cheese for two nights a week (because cheese is cheating), and even then the math works out that it would be cheaper to just buy frozen pizzas.

I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

For reference, I frequently use this website in the hunt for cheap meals.  https://www.budgetbytes.com/​   Even for chicken and pasta with vegetables you come out worse than Stouffers frozen lasagna and that's not even counting the fact that some kind of processed food is always on sale in the freezer section.
 
2018-02-09 10:18:52 AM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


Yeah, fark it. That apple at the top of that tree probably doesn't taste any good anyway.
 
2018-02-09 10:20:31 AM  
Be quiet and play with your Gluttony Barbie!!!

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
d23 [BareFark]
2018-02-09 10:21:35 AM  

Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.


The problem in many urban areas it is NOT cheaper to eat fresh food because there is a huge cost to get to a grocery store.  Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.  So it's time and money to get a suburban grocery chain.
 
2018-02-09 10:22:11 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.


Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.
 
2018-02-09 10:25:13 AM  

Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.


I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.
 
2018-02-09 10:26:57 AM  

lilistonic: My middle daughter and her little family stayed with us last week. They are vegetarian and sometimes vegan, so I made sweet potato and barley stew, and other such things, and that was fine for the week. But after they left, I cooked 10 lbs of pork shoulder and divided it for carnitas and pulled pork sandwiches for the rest of us to enjoy for a few days.

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle. But I don't think I'd enjoy life as much without ceviche, sashimi, carpaccio, and crudo when I can get those, and sometimes lovely chunks of tender delicious pork. And eggs, lots of eggs. I tend to crave foods with lots of B12, but I don't have the enzyme to digest it so I have to have shots or tablets.

Anyway. I just think we need to strive for balance for our individual needs. I think for most people it feels unnatural to eliminate huge swathes of food, and also cook so many different things than they adapted to throughout life, so they go for what's easiest. My upbringing was a little unusual for the time and place, and I was exposed to a broader variety of foods and cuisines than my peers, so some of the food challenges are easier for me. As I age, I still want to retain as wide a variety as possible, but it does require time and energy (or else having a great deal of money) to do it healthfully all the time. I spend more money on less beef and chicken to have it come from good sources, and use smaller amounts in my cooking. Etcetera.


To go along with this, it isn't that expensive to eat healthy *if* (big if) you have the money to do things like buy whole cuts of meat and know how to divide, and know what to do with it (which the article definitely addressed, which was a nice change from typical food access articles).

The local store sells boneless half shoulders or steaks for around $5/lb, but bone in whole shoulders for $1.10/lb.  So if all you have is $5 you get a pork steak that'll feed one person one meal, but if you have $12 you can get a whole shoulder that'll feed a family of 4 for 2-3 meals - if you know how to cook it.
 
2018-02-09 10:27:06 AM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


Yep. We all die in the end. Depends on the type of life you want.

Some people want a life where their greatest joy is gorging on crappy food. Where getting up a flight of stairs is a struggle, before they get a scooter and start losing toes to the 'beetus. Washing themselves with a rag on a stick.

Some people want a life with good food and cooking new things, while moderating portions and keeping in shape. Where being able to play in the mountains, skiing and hiking is a big part of their life. For example, one person I instruct with is 82, and still skiing all the time. I want to be like him.
 
2018-02-09 10:28:43 AM  
  "[Researchers] analyzed what happened to a household's food purchases when a new, full-service grocery store opened in the neighborhood, or when the household moved from 'food deserts' to areas with more abundant grocery options. But even major changes in a household's immediate food environment, the paper found, had a limited impact on the foods that people purchased."

"We reject that neighborhood environments have meaningful effects on healthy eating. Using a structural demand model, we find that exposing low-income households to the same availability and prices experienced by high-income households reduces nutritional inequality by only 9%, while the remaining 91% is driven by differences in demand. These findings contrast with discussions of nutritional inequality that emphasize supply-side factors such as food deserts."


That's not how this works. You have to account for the fact that people who have lived their entire lives eating processed, over-salted junk are likely to keep buying it. Someone who grew up on hot dogs and potato chips isn't going to drop several decades of habit overnight. You might get through to their kids though. Stuff doesn't change overnight.

Also, "exposing low-income households to the same availability and prices experienced by high-income households" does not mean that healthy food is equally affordable for poor people. It still costs more. Might as well ask why poor people don't eat salmon often when there's a perfectly good fish market in their neighborhood selling it for $20 per pound, down the road from the place that sells a pound of hot dogs for one dollar.

That all said, there are healthy foods that are affordable. Brown rice, beans, eggs, frozen vegetables. Try eating those things if you're looking at the avocados and salads, thinking it's cheaper to just eat potato chips and hot dogs.
 
2018-02-09 10:29:27 AM  

d23: Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

The problem in many urban areas it is NOT cheaper to eat fresh food because there is a huge cost to get to a grocery store.  Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.  So it's time and money to get a suburban grocery chain.


Even as an upper-middle class white guy with a car only goes to the grocery store once a week with a list and who produces a tiny amount of food waste (food waste is a killer on your budget) , I'd do better filling my cart with Lean Cuisine.
 
2018-02-09 10:31:04 AM  

Thingster: lilistonic: My middle daughter and her little family stayed with us last week. They are vegetarian and sometimes vegan, so I made sweet potato and barley stew, and other such things, and that was fine for the week. But after they left, I cooked 10 lbs of pork shoulder and divided it for carnitas and pulled pork sandwiches for the rest of us to enjoy for a few days.

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle. But I don't think I'd enjoy life as much without ceviche, sashimi, carpaccio, and crudo when I can get those, and sometimes lovely chunks of tender delicious pork. And eggs, lots of eggs. I tend to crave foods with lots of B12, but I don't have the enzyme to digest it so I have to have shots or tablets.

Anyway. I just think we need to strive for balance for our individual needs. I think for most people it feels unnatural to eliminate huge swathes of food, and also cook so many different things than they adapted to throughout life, so they go for what's easiest. My upbringing was a little unusual for the time and place, and I was exposed to a broader variety of foods and cuisines than my peers, so some of the food challenges are easier for me. As I age, I still want to retain as wide a variety as possible, but it does require time and energy (or else having a great deal of money) to do it healthfully all the time. I spend more money on less beef and chicken to have it come from good sources, and use smaller amounts in my cooking. Etcetera.

To go along with this, it isn't that expensive to eat healthy *if* (big if) you have the money to do things like buy whole cuts of meat and know how to divide, and know what to do with it (which the article definitely addressed, which was a nice change from typical food access articles).

The local store sells boneless half shoulders or steaks for around $5/lb, but bone in whole shoulders for $1.10/lb.  So if all you have is $5 you get a pork steak tha ...


You are so so right. I had six kids, and it took a long time to learn just how to carve up the budget to buy in bulk. We had a mantra for years: you gotta have money to save money. But it is one of the goals worth working for, when possible. Getting my large slow cooker was super exciting for me, and I started buying the Costco membership with part of the IRS refund, to use for large cuts of meat that I'd bring home and section into ziploc bags, and also big bags of potatoes, onions, oranges, etc., and large boxes of decent quality cereal.

Then I had to readjust to cooking for fewer and fewer over the years...:-)
 
2018-02-09 10:34:47 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.


All of my math involves bulk and sale and leftovers.  I'm not some amateur farking around here.  I put work into this.  I know what you're saying sounds true.  It's what everyone says, especially young people, but if you work on the meal price per person - actually sit down and run numbers -  with bulk and with leftovers (I have two double-night meals planned next week one of which involves a slow-cooker) and the dollar menu starts to look really appealing.

My grocery list for tomorrow's shopping trip is already done and it gets me through the next Friday night.
 
2018-02-09 10:35:11 AM  
Between prescription addictions, alcoholism, illegal drug addictions, and overeating, it's obvious Americans are in a lot of psychic pain. Eating healthily doesn't reduce psychic pain (my depressed Californian brother eats about 4,000 healthy calories a day), but working on resolving psychological issues can result in the desire to eat healthier, bc you're not eating emotions anymore, you're eating food. Main problem: resolving psych issues is one of the most difficult undertakings in the human experience.
 
2018-02-09 10:35:25 AM  

togaman2k: Between TV/billboard advertising being exclusively fatty/salty/sugary crap and a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods in addition to the billions of dollars of government subsidies for fatty/salty/sugary input components - it's not that hard to see that our food economy is weighted heavily toward the worst foods for us.  It's called the "Standard American Diet" for a reason.

It's not hard to go shopping for fruits/vegetables/beans/nuts, but given the choice between a green salad with rice/bean bowl for dinner and that frozen DiGiorno pizza that was BOGO, it's easier to throw the pizza in the oven than take 30-45 minutes to prepare a wholesome meal. I pass at least 20 restaurants/fast food places in 5 miles from picking up my kid from daycare to home. Most nights, instead of fighting to keep him entertained and out of my hair while I prep a healthy dinner, it's much easier to get takeout on the way home.


100% honesty time - as long as bad food tastes better, it will beat free healthy food 8/10 times.
 
2018-02-09 10:36:23 AM  

Mike_LowELL: togaman2k: a genetic predisposition to desire fatty/salty/sugary foods

Careful there, I was informed humans are blank canvases who have been failed by society.  Don't you go toutin' them ganetic perdisposition's!


Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bliss_p​o​int_(food)

AdamK: SaladMonkey: I was about to go on a rant about the article missing the obvious point, but then I found it, so kudos to the author:

If health care providers, teachers, legislators, and insurance companies want to see a significant uptick in Americans' health -- and it is in everyone's best interest to work toward this -- then low-income individuals must be taught how to prepare food from scratch. In doing so, they'll learn how to take advantage of the many ingredients available to them. Without those practical tools, it's unrealistic to expect households to wean themselves off a heavily-processed diet.

Processed food is easy and delicious.  Fresh food is hard, and bland unless you do it right (in which case it is much much better than processed).

Processed meals are tasty if you like the taste of sodium and sugar, if for whatever reason those two don't light your world on fire then they're actually pretty bland a lot of the time. Since i've been making my own meals i've fallen out of love of sugar altogether, it tastes weird to me now.


People develop a tolerance for the taste of salt/fat/sugar. I'm much more sensitive to the taste of salt and sugar now that I cook for myself and don't drink soda.
 
2018-02-09 10:37:39 AM  

SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?


I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.
 
2018-02-09 10:38:08 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

All of my math involves bulk and sale and leftovers.  I'm not some amateur farking around here.  I put work into this.  I know what you're saying sounds true.  It's what everyone says, especially young people, but if you work on the meal price per person - actually sit down and run numbers -  with bulk and with leftovers (I have two double-night meals planned next week one of which involves a slow-cooker) and the dollar menu starts to look really appealing.

My grocery list for tomorrow's shopping trip is already done and it gets me through the next Friday night.


I've done the exact same as you, and honestly the fast food just does not work out to be cheaper when you factor in how much fast food you need to eat to feel full. You need about four of the dollar items to make a meal, wheras I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.
 I don't know what the difference is in our methods, but in my case there was zero doubt the healthy stuff ended up being cheaper.
 
2018-02-09 10:39:48 AM  

Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

My two favorite activities are cooking and saving money (what an exciting life I lead).  Anyway, I only cook from scratch (canned beans counts although dried are cheaper and better),  I only buy meat on sale, and I challenge myself to make vegetarian meals without cheese for two nights a week (because cheese is cheating), and even then the math works out that it would be cheaper to just buy frozen pizzas.

I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

For reference, I frequently use this website in the hunt for cheap meals.  https://www.budgetbytes.com/   Even for chicken and pasta with vegetables you come out worse than Stouffers frozen lasagna and that's not even counting the fact that some kind of processed food is always on sale in the freezer section.


Yes the $1 menu is cheaper and easier. Look if cheapEST and quickEST are a person's priorities than yes they should go do that.
That link you dropped is a great example of what I am talking about. Families can get nutrition on a tight budget if they put the time and effort into it just as you described with your personal example.
 
2018-02-09 10:41:39 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.


I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.
 
2018-02-09 10:44:24 AM  

DocTravesty: SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?

I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.


My parents eat their salad after the main course, and I just scratch my head. Eat the healthy stuff first, and you might not eat as much potato, hamburger, cheese, etc. Eating the salad after the really tasty stuff (I enjoy a good salad but when you're hungry it doesn't silence the growl the way heartier stuff does) just seems like doing penance after you've fully indulged in sin.
 
2018-02-09 10:45:40 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.


Yeah, I definitely believe there is something to that. Someone mentioned craving B vitamins, and I've found that I don't need to eat as much meat when I eat the grassfed stuff-- like, about half of what I would eat in a McDonald's burger,
 
2018-02-09 10:46:13 AM  

d23: Rapmaster2000: AlanMooresBeard: Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.

"Is a lot cheaper than people assume" might be true depending on what people we're talking about and what these people assume is cheap, but buying processed frozen food is the cheapest.

The problem in many urban areas it is NOT cheaper to eat fresh food because there is a huge cost to get to a grocery store.  Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.  So it's time and money to get a suburban grocery chain.


Ask your self why have the grocery stores moved out of urban areas?  Maybe  because they are not profitable?  Whose money do you propose to get a suburban grocery chain?  Some millionaire philanthropist?
 
2018-02-09 10:48:02 AM  

feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.


I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.
 
2018-02-09 10:48:36 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.


Yes - consuming sugar causes blood sugar spikes quickly followed by valleys (resulting in hunger), and fast food uses a ton of sugar, even where you would not expect it (http://www.businessinsider.com/sugar​-i​n-fast-food-2016-1 ) .  Healthy foods typically doesn't have as much sugar, or it is in a form that isn't as quickly absorbed, so you end up feeling satisfied longer.
 
2018-02-09 10:50:56 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.


And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.
 
2018-02-09 10:52:24 AM  

feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.

And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.


You should look into soylent.
 
2018-02-09 10:53:31 AM  
Americans could eat healthier. They just don't want to

Look in the trash can of any public school cafeteria if you doubt that statement.
 
2018-02-09 10:54:01 AM  
At the end of the day when I'm drunk is no time to make healthy food choices
 
Ant
2018-02-09 10:54:55 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


I can't handle stuff like that anymore. There was a time when I would've thought that looked good, but now it just looks like heartburn and nausea. I actually find myself craving raw, crunchy vegetables nowadays!
 
2018-02-09 10:55:03 AM  

Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: feralbaby: I spent the same amount on rice and veggies with a little  egg thrown in, and that lasted for about three meals.

I see the difference.  I could probably save more if I ate steamed rice and vegetables.

And beans, ground turkey, even beef  when I'm in the mood.  It's all worked out to be cheaper.

You should look into soylent.


It's on the dollar menu.
 
2018-02-09 10:55:05 AM  
There was a pizza joint near my house.  Called Pizza Salad.   All organic,  non-GMO,  vegetarian.  Vegan and gluten-free options.   It's gone now.
 
2018-02-09 10:57:54 AM  
Habits die hard.  Almost nobody intentionally makes a healthy change to their diet unless they have a real medical reason to do so. (I have recently been making diet changes for medical reasons)

The food you eat affects your body in terribly subtle ways and you don't notice the effects until like two weeks later, or longer.  That's why dieting is so hard, even though the calories-in minus calories-out calculations are pretty elementary.  The human brain is wired to trust what it sees (and tastes!), overriding logic and reason.
 
2018-02-09 10:58:30 AM  
There is such emphasis on longevity in the N.A. society (and in the health care field) of today. Why? My theory that it is because we have developed such an all-consuming fear of dying. Why do I say that? Say what you will, but IMHO, it is in large part due to the breakdown of the nuclear family (and the abandonment of religious/spiritual beliefs). When you examine the present-day 'family' structure and contrast it with  what was the 'traditional' family structure where there were two or three generations in the same household, it becomes clear that there were benefits to the young generation in witnessing and experiencing firsthand the death of a grand parent or great grandparent. This then conditioned them to the reality of their own morbidity and mortality. Quality of life is so much more important than how long you 'survive'.
 
2018-02-09 11:00:22 AM  

d23: [img.fark.net image 404x402]

And I get to break out the best gif ever posted on Fark.


I always did admire a good ol'  left hand salute.
 
2018-02-09 11:06:17 AM  

Marksrevenge: DocTravesty: SirEattonHogg: ThrillaManilla: I got a promotion yesterday and celebrated with half a pizza and an oversized slice of peanut butter pie.  If I'm going to be an office manager, I better look like one.

Speaking of which, it's supposedly national pizza day today.

If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?

I have found that eating a small salad with my pizza is an excellent way to eat slightly less pizza and thus feel slightly less terrible afterward.  And by salad, I mean a fistful of baby spinach thrown on a plate.

My parents eat their salad after the main course, and I just scratch my head. Eat the healthy stuff first, and you might not eat as much potato, hamburger, cheese, etc. Eating the salad after the really tasty stuff (I enjoy a good salad but when you're hungry it doesn't silence the growl the way heartier stuff does) just seems like doing penance after you've fully indulged in sin.


There's been a tradition of doing that in the past and in other places. I was told it helped cleanse the palate, and also aided digestion. But I don't know if the second part is real science or not. And of course, the palate-cleansing salad is probably pretty simple with just some fresh greens dressed lightly.
 
2018-02-09 11:06:37 AM  

EdAmesAndMrs.: There is such emphasis on longevity in the N.A. society (and in the health care field) of today. Why? My theory that it is because we have developed such an all-consuming fear of dying. Why do I say that? Say what you will, but IMHO, it is in large part due to the breakdown of the nuclear family (and the abandonment of religious/spiritual beliefs). When you examine the present-day 'family' structure and contrast it with  what was the 'traditional' family structure where there were two or three generations in the same household, it becomes clear that there were benefits to the young generation in witnessing and experiencing firsthand the death of a grand parent or great grandparent. This then conditioned them to the reality of their own morbidity and mortality. Quality of life is so much more important than how long you 'survive'.


It's not the fear of death that made me change my diet and exercise habits. It's the fear of life without quality. There's not much quality of life if you live the last 10 years you have with the after effects of a stroke. I watched my mother go through that. No thanks.
 
2018-02-09 11:10:15 AM  
I eat only 7 course meals.

A six pack and a bag of chips.
 
OOF
2018-02-09 11:11:31 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:12:03 AM  

Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.


Ain't THAT the truth.

I love, love, love salty foods.  Soy sauce?  POUR IT ON!  The hot curry that comes in a box and looks sorta like a candy bar?  MY FAVORITE.

But after I cut sodium out back in November, I'm right there with you.  Ate some food they served at the Legion one night and I couldn't believe how salty it was, despite the person who cooked it saying "I didn't put as much salt in as I usually do, there are salt shakers on the tables."

Another problem I had was chronic dehydration.  Too much salt plus chronic dehydration is a recipe for high blood pressure as your body will ditch potassium (regulates BP) and hang onto sodium.  You also might wind up with a kidney stone the size of a quarter that requires two rounds of ESWL to get rid of.  That really sucked.
 
d23 [BareFark]
2018-02-09 11:13:21 AM  

AugieDoggyDaddy: Ask your self why have the grocery stores moved out of urban areas? Maybe because they are not profitable? Whose money do you propose to get a suburban grocery chain? Some millionaire philanthropist?


I don't know what the fark you are talking about.   I didn't make a commentary on the stores moving out.

Oh... and good luck on your corporate worship.  I don't happen to put profit before everything.  Kay? Bye bye now.
 
2018-02-09 11:13:21 AM  

feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.


PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE
1/3 cup natural peanut butter
1/3 cup warm water
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 ½ teaspoons grated or minced ginger
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 teaspoons agave or honey
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce

https://www.thugkitchen.com/grilled_s​u​gar_snap_peas_with_peanut_dip_sauce

Just had to pass on.  Throw this on everything and anything and thank me whenever you're done NOM-ing.
 
2018-02-09 11:14:26 AM  
I don't really see the point of extending my life if I have to share the planet with the kinds of people that already infest it.
 
2018-02-09 11:15:08 AM  

Marksrevenge: That all said, there are healthy foods that are affordable. Brown rice, beans, eggs, frozen vegetables. Try eating those things if you're looking at the avocados and salads, thinking it's cheaper to just eat potato chips and hot dogs.


I love the steamer packs.  Pop em in the nucularwave for 5 minutes and bam, a big bowl of veggies.

And you are absolutely right about staples being affordable.  However you left off potatos ;-)
 
2018-02-09 11:19:15 AM  

Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.


Ditto to both of you. The amount of sodium (and in conjunction, sugar) in foods you don't expect them is mind-blowing once you start reading labels.

I now buy unsalted canned vegetables (of the few I buy/use), I buy unsalted broth, even my own canned vegetables I don't use salt in them. I've cut the amount of salt I actually use in my cooking way down, just salting my serving on my plate, and I don't miss it a lot of the time. But I find that when I do splurge on food, like pizza for instance, it's almost too salty to enjoy.

Honestly I rarely eat out because I find it more expensive than cooking at home, and I can't justify the expense for a single meal. For the $9 I spent at Wendy's for a chicken sandwich, fries, and drink that could buy me several days worth of fresh vegetables that go with the wild game meat I put in my freezer during the fall.

And not to be an elitist, as I do occasionally enjoy my box mac and cheese and ramen. Don't look at me like that, being pregnant has taught me that when so many of my favorite healthy foods are suddenly an anathema to my nose and taste buds, food is food. I just limit my portions and try to mix it with healthy things that don't make me want to vomit. :P
 
2018-02-09 11:19:35 AM  
Let me throw this theory out there:

Perhaps modern medicine has mitigated the effects of a poor diet, discouraging people to change their ways. Today if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc. you can take pills that are pretty effective at getting them under control. You don't really have to change what you eat.
 
2018-02-09 11:21:21 AM  
Is sugar good or bad? Is fat good or bad? Is coffee good or bad? Is wine good or bad? Red or white? Does organic make a difference? Should I eat meat? If so how much? Is the food pyramid accurate? What percentage of body fat is healthy? Are GMO foods heathy? Are supplemental vitamins worth it? How much water should I drink?

I got your study right here.
 
2018-02-09 11:25:39 AM  
EdAmesAndMrs.:

It's not the fear of death that made me change my diet and exercise habits. It's the fear of life without quality. There's not much quality of life if you live the last 10 years you have with the after effects of a stroke. I watched my mother go through that. No thanks.

Absolutely agree with you. People in their 40s with difficulties walking, gall bladder surgery, heart problems related to weight.
That is what I don't get about the whole "I want to eat what I want! Nobody lives forever!" crowd.
Its not like statistically you are healthy one day then the next you die.
You could have decades of suffering and terrible quality of life.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:08 AM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


I think it's more important to be healthy while alive than live long but face limitations on what you can do because you're unhealthy.

I know plenty of people who are overweight. In all likelihood they'll live long lives, but just walking a mile or two fatigues them. That's not a way to go through life.
 
2018-02-09 11:27:20 AM  

Poowaddins: Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.

Ditto to both of you. The amount of sodium (and in conjunction, sugar) in foods you don't expect them is mind-blowing once you start reading labels.

I now buy unsalted canned vegetables (of the few I buy/use), I buy unsalted broth, even my own canned vegetables I don't use salt in them. I've cut the amount of salt I actually use in my cooking way down, just salting my serving on my plate, and I don't miss it a lot of the time. But I find that when I do splurge on food, like pizza for instance, it's almost too salty to enjoy.

Honestly I rarely eat out because I find it more expensive than cooking at home, and I can't justify the expense for a single meal. For the $9 I spent at Wendy's for a chicken sandwich, fries, and drink that could buy me several days worth of fresh vegetables that go with the wild game meat I put in my freezer during the fall.

And not to be an elitist, as I do occasionally enjoy my box mac and cheese and ramen. Don't look at me like that, being pregnant has taught me that when so many of my favorite healthy foods are suddenly an anathema to my nose and taste buds, food is food. I just limit my portions and try to mix it with healthy things that don't make me want to vomit. :P


I like using this.  As something sprinkled on cooked food, meh, it tastes a little chemical-y.  Cooked into food, not so much.  And it has a shiatload of potassium.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:30:15 AM  
I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4
 
2018-02-09 11:31:10 AM  

danceswithcrows: [crow202.org image 512x340]
...When you have options like this, why would you eat salad?


Because colorectal cancer sorta sucks, and nothing tastes so good that it's worth having to regularly dump out a colostomy bag?
 
2018-02-09 11:31:41 AM  

smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4


bucks, I would have bought it but not triple+ price.  /meh phone messed up //apologies for second post ///3s
 
2018-02-09 11:33:18 AM  
After switching to a low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet our grocery bill skyrocketed. Lots of fresh meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, and produce, no pasta and no bread. No junk food. It's about $200 a week for the both of us. And that's with me only really eating once a day. But we don't (and won't) have kids so we can afford it and I know for a fact I'm much healthier than I was- lighter too!
 
2018-02-09 11:36:14 AM  

Jadedgrl: After switching to a low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet our grocery bill skyrocketed. Lots of fresh meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, and produce, no pasta and no bread. No junk food. It's about $200 a week for the both of us. And that's with me only really eating once a day. But we don't (and won't) have kids so we can afford it and I know for a fact I'm much healthier than I was- lighter too!


Keto and Paleo can be quite expensive. Takes quite a bit more time to plan out cheap meals on these diets.
 
2018-02-09 11:39:23 AM  

feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.


And when you cook, cook a lot!
The weekend roasts can make lunches for the entire work week.
One of those big spiral hams once yielded 3 suppers of meat and 25 lunch-sized portions in baggies to pop into the freezer.  For the last few years - with less than, say, 5 times per year- I've taken my lunch to work from home.
I estimate that I saved AT LEAST $50 a week or so from buying lunches ($200 a month, $2,400 per year).
 
2018-02-09 11:39:39 AM  

smd31: smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4

bucks, I would have bought it but not triple+ price.  /meh phone messed up //apologies for second post ///3s


I know what you are talking about. I get there are extra costs but some of those pasta sauces are just ridiculous. I particularly hate the ones cashing in on the health crazes that has nothing to do with pasta sauce.
Wow your crushed tomatoes are gluten free and fat free!?!? Take my money!
 
2018-02-09 11:42:40 AM  
Also, I don't get where folks are whining about "If I ate rice, beans and veggies all the time, I guess it would be cheaper..."

Exactly how much diversity are you getting in your fast food diet?  A burger and a bun, with "potatoes" (fries) and maybe a wilted piece of lettuce now and then, is better, how?

All the stuff you use to shake it up with fast food (cheese, ketchup, seasonings) can be done with healthy food.
 
2018-02-09 11:42:59 AM  

SirEattonHogg: If you don't eat pizza today, you hate America.  And let's face it, salad instead of pizza?  Really?


Foods I regularly crave: Salads.

Foods I never crave: Pizza.

/Pizza's just okay in my book.
 
2018-02-09 11:44:50 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 11:48:11 AM  
Pretty much sums it up. We have seen unhealthy eating, and we like it.
 
2018-02-09 11:52:46 AM  

smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4


Helpful Hint:  Add a little white wine or vermouth to the sauce while it's warming up and it'll taste 1000% better.
 
2018-02-09 11:57:13 AM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: One thing I've become acutely aware of in the past few years is how geography and health are correlated. I grew up in Kansas and my family is from southern Indiana, two places where obesity is a visible obvious epidemic. Here in Colorado, obesity is the exception. My children have lived most of their lives in this culture, so when we travel, one the first things they notice is how fat the rest of the country is in comparison. Colorado grocery stores are filled with the same garbage as grocery stores in the rest of the country, and we have the same high-calorie restaurants as you'll find elsewhere. It just comes down to a different culture. We're not genetically superior in Colorado. A lot of us just choose to live healthy lifestyles.


You can see that in pretty much any major airport in America. Look at where the flight is going. Flyover: lard asses.  LA/Denver/Seattle: More or less fit people.

/ lives in flyover
 
2018-02-09 11:57:33 AM  

d23: AugieDoggyDaddy: Ask your self why have the grocery stores moved out of urban areas? Maybe because they are not profitable? Whose money do you propose to get a suburban grocery chain? Some millionaire philanthropist?

I don't know what the fark you are talking about.   I didn't make a commentary on the stores moving out.

Oh... and good luck on your corporate worship.  I don't happen to put profit before everything.  Kay? Bye bye now.

Dude,really you say bye bye and run away?
From you own post "Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas"Okay, that's not a commentary,it's just a comment.So technical you are correct.
Business needs to make a profit to stay in business. That's not corporate worship.   You computer, ISP, electricity.  Are those locally sourced,  organic, not for profit

and environmentally friendly?
Would you prefer to wait in line for 8 hour in -20 weather to buy beets and bread and vodka?
 
2018-02-09 12:00:02 PM  

NotThatGuyAgain: I like using this.  As something sprinkled on cooked food, meh, it tastes a little chemical-y.  Cooked into food, not ...


Meh. Besides, most of the time the 2lb block of Amish butter I buy has just enough salt in it that when a pat is mixed around in a bowl of steamed broccoli for instance, I don't need to add any additional salt for me. Although there's a lot of times I just eat vegetables plain, too.
 
2018-02-09 12:03:32 PM  
Food preferences are shaped from childhood.

Really? Because my parents couldn't cook for shiat.

If my childhood shaped anything, it's what I sure as hell DON'T want to eat ever again. My dad was from the Irish/English "boil everything until it falls apart" school, and I don't know what happened with my mom. Her brother taught himself Chinese cooking, her other relatives' skills ranged from excellent to outstanding...but aside from deviled eggs, my mom was a menace in the kitchen. She may have been the only person who could screw up boxed macaroni and cheese. If she felt her meals needed a little something extra there was only one solution: add canned mushrooms. And make sure they're good and rubbery.

I taught myself how to cook simple stuff when I got to middle school, so that I would have already had dinner by the time my folks got home. Also, we had a neighbor who had a quarter-acre garden and would regularly supply us with veggies that even my mom couldn't screw up. I ate Swiss chard by the crate as a result.

The people who did shape my food preferences were the women I dated, and the one I eventually married. Nothing motivates a guy to raise his cooking and nutritional game like a beautiful woman cooking the best steak he's ever had on a $3.99 disposable Walmart grill.
 
2018-02-09 12:06:12 PM  

FizixJunkee: smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4

Helpful Hint:  Add a little white wine or vermouth to the sauce while it's warming up and it'll taste 1000% better.


You sir (or madame) have my attention. I've done red wine in pasta sauce but never white. Vermouth... white dry or sweet red?
 
2018-02-09 12:12:36 PM  
The fun thing about threads like this one is reading comments from people justifying the poor quality food they buy.  Justifying because they don't have time to cook from scratch, or because buying better quality food is too expensive, etc.  And then we wonder why doctors say our worst health issues (obesity, diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure) are largely preventable with diet (and exercise).
 
2018-02-09 12:13:37 PM  

AlanMooresBeard: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.


I have to disagree.  I think we're not considering practical issues in many homes, especially lower-income homes.

A common scenario:
-Mom gets up at 6, makes breakfast, packs lunches, leaves at 8 and works 9-6, home by 7
-Dad gets up at 5:30, leaves at 6 and works 7-4, home by 4:30
-Kids need to be ready for school by 7:45 each morning
-Kids get home from school at 4:30
-Kids need help with homework in the evenings
-Kids need to be in bed at 8:30
-Housework and laundry have to be done
-Shopping has to be done
-Basic errands take a long time because the family relies on the bus
-Parent's have managed to manage the budget to let Susan play soccer on Tuesday evenings and give Billy piano lessons on Thursdays after school.
-Kids need (and have a right to) down-time for playing and fun.

It's easy to see where you might find it extremely difficult to have time for a healthy meal prepared from scratch. An hour in the evening can be very hard to come by.  It's not surprising that using prepared foods can be frequently the only way to manage the hours in a day.

This has nothing to do with laziness, lack of information or parenting skills. it has everything to do with the way we have designed so much of our economy and life structure around things that make it harder, not easier, to make family life a priority.
 
2018-02-09 12:14:05 PM  

d23: Grocery stores have moved out of urban areas and the poor don't often have a car.


As someone who lives in an urban area and has traveled extensively across the US and the rest of the world, what urban areas are you talking about here?

I live in a "bad" neighborhood in Chicago, and can walk to three different grocery stores less than 10 minutes each from my door, and there are a couple of bodega type stores on my block that carry full selections of meat and produce.  If anything, it's easier for me to cook at home in the city than it ever was when I lived in the suburbs, because if I forgot an ingredient I just run to the corner instead of having to get into my car, drive a mile or two, park, go in, shop, pay, and drive back home.
 
2018-02-09 12:16:28 PM  
Yep. I've always had access to healthy food, but only changed my diet to healthy food when I decided I wanted to eat better and lose weight.

/ Down 50 lbs in a year.
// Did it by controlling portion size, eating better foods and exercising.
/// Still enjoy the occasional buffalo wing, burger, etc. but in moderation and in a reasonable quantity.
 
2018-02-09 12:16:59 PM  

AlanMooresBeard: FizixJunkee: smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4

Helpful Hint:  Add a little white wine or vermouth to the sauce while it's warming up and it'll taste 1000% better.

You sir (or madame) have my attention. I've done red wine in pasta sauce but never white. Vermouth... white dry or sweet red?


Any alcohol will release alcohol-soluble flavor compounds in the tomatoes.
 
2018-02-09 12:21:58 PM  

anustart: AlanMooresBeard: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.

I have to disagree.  I think we're not considering practical issues in many homes, especially lower-income homes.

A common scenario:
-Mom gets up at 6, makes breakfast, packs lunches, leaves at 8 and works 9-6, home by 7
-Dad gets up at 5:30, leaves at 6 and works 7-4, home by 4:30
-Kids need to be ready for school by 7:45 each morning
-Kids get home from school at 4:30
-Kids need help with homework in the evenings
-Kids need to be in bed at 8:30
-Housework and laundry have to be done
-Shopping has to be done
-Basic errands take a long time because the family relies on the bus
-Parent's have managed to manage the budget to let Susan play soccer on Tuesday evenings and give Billy piano lessons on Thursdays after school.
-Kids need (and have a right to) down-time for playing and fun.

It's easy to see where you might find it extremely difficult to have time for a healthy meal prepared from scratch. An hour in the evening can be very hard to come by.  It's not surprising that using prepared foods can be frequently the only way to manage the hours in a day.

This has nothing to do with laziness, lack of information or parenting skills. it has everything to do with the way we have designed so much of our economy and life structure around things that make it harder, not easier, to make family life a priority.


Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".
 
2018-02-09 12:22:13 PM  

Wave Of Anal Fury: The fun thing about threads like this one is reading comments from people justifying the poor quality food they buy.  Justifying because they don't have time to cook from scratch, or because buying better quality food is too expensive, etc.  And then we wonder why doctors say our worst health issues (obesity, diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure) are largely preventable with diet (and exercise).


This is why socialized healthcare is so appealing. You can save a lot of money AND buy more unhealthy food!
 
2018-02-09 12:22:41 PM  
I changed my diet to avoid highly processed foods and added sugar (I avoid food with anything more than 3 grams of sugar per serving) and I've lost weight and expanded my food choices. Expanded because now I can eat stuff without craving it to be so sweet. Eating "clean" doesn't have to bust your budget if you can plan out what you want to get at the supermarket beforehand.

*And on this picture, I would change "Eat food" to "Eat more natural food".

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 12:22:47 PM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: One thing I've become acutely aware of in the past few years is how geography and health are correlated. I grew up in Kansas and my family is from southern Indiana, two places where obesity is a visible obvious epidemic. Here in Colorado, obesity is the exception. My children have lived most of their lives in this culture, so when we travel, one the first things they notice is how fat the rest of the country is in comparison. Colorado grocery stores are filled with the same garbage as grocery stores in the rest of the country, and we have the same high-calorie restaurants as you'll find elsewhere. It just comes down to a different culture. We're not genetically superior in Colorado. A lot of us just choose to live healthy lifestyles.


As someone who grew up and currently lives in Southern Indiana, but whose husband is from Western Montana (I lived there for a couple of years with him), this is the absolute truth. I think a lot of it is the culture and the rest is the actual environmental climate where outdoor activity is encouraged and is actually enjoyable. The oppressive heat and humidity here in Indiana is not conducive to me wanting to go for a walk much less anything else more strenuous past the end of of May. But out west with 20% or less humidity? Even the 90's don't phase me and I still enjoy my mountain hike. I was a lot thinner, healthier, and happier out west.

I've also noticed that on the whole people out west take an almost European approach to eating. Wholesome, whole food meals, with smaller portions and a focus on a fresher preparation. Here and in much of the Midwest where I've visited, it's all overly salted, overly sugared, and overly cooked. And fat people abound.

In a pregnancy craving fit I went to the local Chinese buffet with my grandmother the other day. I mostly eat their stir-fried vegetables and a few pieces of General Tso's chicken. I don't know how they cook those green beans and onions like that, but mmm. I'm fat, I'll readily admit it, as I've struggled with PCOS and insulin resistance my entire adult life. But at home, I try to eat as healthy as I possibly can. And I do splurge once in a while, because you can't be good all of the time. That's why God/Goddess/no one invented the "cheat day". ;)

But after watching obese patron after obese patron walk back and forth with literal mountains of food on their tiny plates, over and over, it really started to bother me on their behalf. My grandmother and I both, quite independently of each other, noticed we were the "thinnest" people dining in there that day. She quietly mentioned it out loud to me, and I was merely thinking it to myself till she said something. And that speaks volumes when my senile 92yo grandmother who can't remember what day of the week it is notices that, she usually doesn't notice other people from my experience. I then wondered what the thin Chinese owners and their family who run and staff the place must think of us on the whole. And it made me sad for my fellow Americans in general. I've got my own demons, sure. But I do try, where most of these people just don't seem to care...
 
2018-02-09 12:22:51 PM  

anustart: AlanMooresBeard: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.

I have to disagree.  I think we're not considering practical issues in many homes, especially lower-income homes.

A common scenario:
-Mom gets up at 6, makes breakfast, packs lunches, leaves at 8 and works 9-6, home by 7
-Dad gets up at 5:30, leaves at 6 and works 7-4, home by 4:30
-Kids need to be ready for school by 7:45 each morning
-Kids get home from school at 4:30
-Kids need help with homework in the evenings
-Kids need to be in bed at 8:30
-Housework and laundry have to be done
-Shopping has to be done
-Basic errands take a long time because the family relies on the bus
-Parent's have managed to manage the budget to let Susan play soccer on Tuesday evenings and give Billy piano lessons on Thursdays after school.
-Kids need (and have a right to) down-time for playing and fun.

It's easy to see where you might find it extremely difficult to have time for a healthy meal prepared from scratch. An hour in the evening can be very hard to come by.  It's not surprising that using prepared foods can be frequently the only way to manage the hours in a day.

This has nothing to do with laziness, lack of information or parenting skills. it has everything to do with the way we have designed so much of our economy and life structure around things that make it harder, not easier, to make family life a priority.


This is true, and even being single, the thought of preparing meals gets tiresome.
 But still, things like fruits and nuts are about as "prepared" of a food as you can get.  And nutrition per calorie- wise, nuts are the better bet over chips.  Obesity rates in kids still being what they are, food choice still factors into the problem at least somewhat.
 
2018-02-09 12:23:32 PM  

feralbaby: feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.

PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE
1/3 cup natural peanut butter
1/3 cup warm water
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 ½ teaspoons grated or minced ginger
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 teaspoons agave or honey
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce

https://www.thugkitchen.com/grilled_su​gar_snap_peas_with_peanut_dip_sauce

Just had to pass on.  Throw this on everything and anything and thank me whenever you're done NOM-ing.


Not to rain on your parade, but a google search reveals that peanut butter is 100 calories and 8g of fat per tablespoon ... that's a healthy alternative ?

Steamed veggies aren't particularly tasty.
Now, if healthy food was as tasty and readily-accessible as the rotisserie chicken that I pick up from the grocery store, I'd be interested. Although, I'm not sure how healthy the pre-made dishes behind the deli counter, are. I'm guessing they will come out a news expose about how unhealthy it is, about a month after I integrate it into my diet.
 
2018-02-09 12:26:27 PM  

AlanMooresBeard: feralbaby: Rapmaster2000: I suppose if I only ate dried rice and beans then I could come out ahead, but decent food cooked yourself is not inexpensive.  The $1 Menu is inexpensive and the time cost is significantly less.

I've never been satisfied for very long with anything off of the dollar menu. Spend a little more for  bulk items and you have leftovers for days.

I've found that the more nutritious a food is with me, the more it fills me.
Whenever I do fast food I find myself hungry pretty soon. I have never really looked into it but I have to wonder if hunger is not only triggered by volume of food in the stomach but quality.


So much this. These past few days, I've eaten at McD's a couple of times because I had to move really quickly (due to a neighbor's negligence) and haven't had time to set my kitchen back up yet.  Granted, I tend to shy away from the larger hamburgers, but even with the Little Big Mac, fries and drink, I would expect that I would be full for a few hours.  But both times, I was like, 'I could go for a little something else', and it had been barely two hours since I'd eaten.  The other time I got Chipotle with black beans and brown rice, and chicken/beef mix.  Stayed fuller longer.  Picked up a poached salmon sushi at Whole Foods. Stayed fuller longer.

The other thing the article talked about was intergenerational habits.  It brought me back to how I have rarely purchased canned veggies or fruit my entire adult life (even when I was living in a not so nice area when I was starting out), and when I was growing up, we always had canned corn, green beans, peaches, etc. regularly.  A few years back, I went to my mother's house for dinner:  fried snapper, cheese spaghetti, and french fries.  Even though that was a familiar dinner growing up, I have never made that for myself.  I remember thinking, 'there are no veggies on this plate'.  My brother, though, still eats like that - and as a result is on Metformin.
 
2018-02-09 12:27:39 PM  

AllUpInYa: feralbaby: feralbaby: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

Exactly.  Get a cheap rice cooker with a steamer basket.  Voila, quinoa and veggies with the same amount of effort it takes to rip open a frozen lasagna and nuke it. Learn how to make a Thai peanut sauce and you will never want for tastiness again.

PEANUT DIPPING SAUCE
1/3 cup natural peanut butter
1/3 cup warm water
1 clove of garlic, minced
1 ½ teaspoons grated or minced ginger
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 teaspoons agave or honey
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce

https://www.thugkitchen.com/grilled_su​gar_snap_peas_with_peanut_dip_sauce

Just had to pass on.  Throw this on everything and anything and thank me whenever you're done NOM-ing.

Not to rain on your parade, but a google search reveals that peanut butter is 100 calories and 8g of fat per tablespoon ... that's a healthy alternative ?

Steamed veggies aren't particularly tasty.
Now, if healthy food was as tasty and readily-accessible as the rotisserie chicken that I pick up from the grocery store, I'd be interested. Although, I'm not sure how healthy the pre-made dishes behind the deli counter, are. I'm guessing they will come out a news expose about how unhealthy it is, about a month after I integrate it into my diet.


Those are good fats, and you only need about a spoonful of this stuff.  You don't use this the way you use mayonnaise.
And the stuff that makes crap food tasty is the same stuff that makes healthy food tasty.  Eat a burger without seasoning and see if you don't go for the spicy roasted kale chips instead.
 
2018-02-09 12:27:59 PM  

mrsleep: Whats the point?
I lived across the street from a guy that was a health nut, exercised every day, ate a healthy diet, no drinking, no smoking, had a heart attack at 44. My grandfather ate the worst diet possible, lots of fatty and greasy foods, was about 50 lbs overweight, lived into his 90's. My great grandmother smoked and gambled till she died in her 90's.

You might as well live a lifestyle that makes you happy.


img.fark.netView Full Size


Carpe Diem!!!
 
2018-02-09 12:42:34 PM  
Because  fresh fruits and vegetables rot in a couple days if not consumed which means going shopping two or three times a week, instead of once every other week. That means an extra 40 hours a month if I walk to the store or $30/m for bus tickets or $20 for fuel.

/and too much fruit gives me diarrhea.
 
2018-02-09 12:42:45 PM  
I think a big part of it is people don't know how to cook. When they try, they don't cook it well so the healthy food tastes bad. So they assume all healthy food like vegetables taste bad.
 
2018-02-09 12:46:26 PM  

Thong_of_Zardoz: Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 12:47:36 PM  
I frequently eat fast food. I'm healthy by all medical and physical accounts. Genetics and activity level are a huge part of it. Also I don't eat huge portions.
 
2018-02-09 12:51:13 PM  

lilistonic: Thingster: lilistonic: My middle daughter and her little family stayed with us last week. They are vegetarian and sometimes vegan, so I made sweet potato and barley stew, and other such things, and that was fine for the week. But after they left, I cooked 10 lbs of pork shoulder and divided it for carnitas and pulled pork sandwiches for the rest of us to enjoy for a few days.

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle. But I don't think I'd enjoy life as much without ceviche, sashimi, carpaccio, and crudo when I can get those, and sometimes lovely chunks of tender delicious pork. And eggs, lots of eggs. I tend to crave foods with lots of B12, but I don't have the enzyme to digest it so I have to have shots or tablets.

Anyway. I just think we need to strive for balance for our individual needs. I think for most people it feels unnatural to eliminate huge swathes of food, and also cook so many different things than they adapted to throughout life, so they go for what's easiest. My upbringing was a little unusual for the time and place, and I was exposed to a broader variety of foods and cuisines than my peers, so some of the food challenges are easier for me. As I age, I still want to retain as wide a variety as possible, but it does require time and energy (or else having a great deal of money) to do it healthfully all the time. I spend more money on less beef and chicken to have it come from good sources, and use smaller amounts in my cooking. Etcetera.

To go along with this, it isn't that expensive to eat healthy *if* (big if) you have the money to do things like buy whole cuts of meat and know how to divide, and know what to do with it (which the article definitely addressed, which was a nice change from typical food access articles).

The local store sells boneless half shoulders or steaks for around $5/lb, but bone in whole shoulders for $1.10/lb.  So if all you have is $5 you get a pork steak tha ...

You are so so right. I had six kids, and it took a long time to learn just how to carve up the budget to buy in bulk. We had a mantra for years: you gotta have money to save money. But it is one of the goals worth working for, when possible. Getting my large slow cooker was super exciting for me, and I started buying the Costco membership with part of the IRS refund, to use for large cuts of meat that I'd bring home and section into ziploc bags, and also big bags of potatoes, onions, oranges, etc., and large boxes of decent quality cereal.

Then I had to readjust to cooking for fewer and fewer over the years...:-)


I LOVE my crock pot.  It's absolutely a life saver. I pick a meal or two, buy the ingredients,  and make meals for the week. Many meals you can get away with just throwing the ingredients in with little prep. Last night I made meatloaf. I've made chilis, beef stroganoff, chicken,  etc. You can put something in it and come home from work with a home cooked, hot meal.
 
2018-02-09 12:58:24 PM  

anustart: Thong_of_Zardoz: Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".

[img.fark.net image 250x250]


I'm not trolling. It was a comment on what people prioritize in their lives.
 
2018-02-09 01:10:13 PM  

Thong_of_Zardoz: anustart: Thong_of_Zardoz: Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".

[img.fark.net image 250x250]

I'm not trolling. It was a comment on what people prioritize in their lives.


My bad, I didn't realize you were one of those "Fark low-income families because they spend all their money on iPhones and big-screen TVs!" types.  My apologies for thinking better of you. I'll try not to do it again.
 
2018-02-09 01:11:44 PM  

4seasons85!: I LOVE my crock pot.  It's absolutely a life saver. I pick a meal or two, buy the ingredients,  and make meals for the week. Many meals you can get away with just throwing the ingredients in with little prep. Last night I made meatloaf. I've made chilis, beef stroganoff, chicken,  etc. You can put something in it and come home from work with a home cooked, hot meal.


It can be a huge time-saver.
Frozen roast in the morning with 1 cup of water and a package of Onion Soup mix.  On medium for 10 hours and supper is ready by 6.
 
2018-02-09 01:41:59 PM  

ObscureNameHere: And when you cook, cook a lot!


The FoodSaver vacuum sealer was probably the best kitchen item we've ever bought.  We have a freezer stocked full of portioned out stew, lasagna, soups, baked mac&cheese, bulk meats.....  you name it.
Highly recommend.  No freezer burn!
 
2018-02-09 01:50:22 PM  

d23: [img.fark.net image 404x402]

And I get to break out the best gif ever posted on Fark.


Who salutes with their left hand?
 
Ant
2018-02-09 01:55:40 PM  

Marksrevenge: That all said, there are healthy foods that are affordable. Brown rice, beans, eggs, frozen vegetables.


Brown rice seems more like a hot breakfast cereal to me. I can't stand it as a substitute for white rice. Beans are good and eggs are fine too, but with very few exceptions (peas, corn, maybe spinach for quiche), frozen vegetables can fark off.
 
2018-02-09 01:57:04 PM  

ProcrastinationStation: ObscureNameHere: And when you cook, cook a lot!

The FoodSaver vacuum sealer was probably the best kitchen item we've ever bought.  .....No freezer burn!


Good info! I wondered if it worked as well as advertised.
 
2018-02-09 01:59:04 PM  

dkulprit: d23: [img.fark.net image 404x402]

And I get to break out the best gif ever posted on Fark.

Who salutes with their left hand?


2D silhouettes of objects from an angle are weird...to me it looks like a view from behind, to you it looks like it's from the front..
 
2018-02-09 02:00:50 PM  

NotThatGuyAgain: Callous: NotThatGuyAgain: Humans are creatures of habit?  The hell you say.

My blood pressure was high so the doc told me to lay off the sodium.  I'd never paid any attention to it and my god, the amount of sodium I was taking in was crazy, and I mostly eat homemade food.

One premade food that's now off my plate is canned biscuits anything.  They have crazy amounts of sodium.  And look up the stunning amount of sodium in a small flour tortilla.

Same here.  Now that it's been a while since I cut salt out of my diet I have a hard time eating out or at someone else's house.  I've become very sensitive to the taste of salt and don't like it.

Ain't THAT the truth.

I love, love, love salty foods.  Soy sauce?  POUR IT ON!  The hot curry that comes in a box and looks sorta like a candy bar?  MY FAVORITE.

But after I cut sodium out back in November, I'm right there with you.  Ate some food they served at the Legion one night and I couldn't believe how salty it was, despite the person who cooked it saying "I didn't put as much salt in as I usually do, there are salt shakers on the tables."

Another problem I had was chronic dehydration.  Too much salt plus chronic dehydration is a recipe for high blood pressure as your body will ditch potassium (regulates BP) and hang onto sodium.  You also might wind up with a kidney stone the size of a quarter that requires two rounds of ESWL to get rid of.  That really sucked.


It is said by some that the reason why Afro-Americans tend to have more problems with high blood pressure than the rest of the population is that their ancestors were not given enough water on the way over in the slave ships, and the ones who survived this dehydration were genetically more able to cope with high salt levels in their blood. https://www.ukessays.com/essay​s/histor​y/hypertension-in-african-americans-an​d-the-middle-passage-history-essay.php​
 
2018-02-09 02:10:15 PM  
lilistonic:

Yesterday someone on Twitter was haranguing people about hating animals if they weren't vegan. It wasn't even subtle.

I tend to eat plant-based but I ate completely vegan for three years (lost about 100 pounds and improved several health indicators drastically).  I did not like to call myself a vegan because it tends to be a synonym for  "self-righteous asshole" to people.
 
2018-02-09 02:11:21 PM  

AngryDragon: blatz514: Gimme!

[img.fark.net image 850x566]

I see all the food groups represented.  What's the problem?


They got the pyramid upside-down.
 
2018-02-09 02:31:40 PM  

anustart: 4seasons85!: I LOVE my crock pot.  It's absolutely a life saver. I pick a meal or two, buy the ingredients,  and make meals for the week. Many meals you can get away with just throwing the ingredients in with little prep. Last night I made meatloaf. I've made chilis, beef stroganoff, chicken,  etc. You can put something in it and come home from work with a home cooked, hot meal.

It can be a huge time-saver.
Frozen roast in the morning with 1 cup of water and a package of Onion Soup mix.  On medium for 10 hours and supper is ready by 6.


Crock pots and pressure cookers are your best friend if you want to be able to cook real food from scratch while still holding down a full time job.

Crock pots require at least enough ability to think ahead that you have the ingredients on hand in the morning so you can toss them in the crock pot before you leave the house for work.

Pressure cookers work quickly enough that you can grab what you intend to make on the way home from work and still have dinner on the table in a reasonable amount of time.

Another good time saver is to make up some large batches of side dishes on the weekend that you can eat with your main courses over the course of the week.

For instance, I'm a fan of cole slaw and it improves with time, so making a big batch on Sunday lets me eat it through the week. Just come up with some generic sides popular with your family. Say baked beans, potato salad, real baked mac and cheese.

I like a side you've probably had in Mexican places where you cook a big bag of pinto beans in chicken stock with taco seasonings, garlic powder, and oregano and then pour in your favorite salsa when it's done. A pressure cooker can go from dried beans to completely done in under an hour. It takes a crock pot all day to do the same thing.

When you get home after work, you either have a meat waiting in the crock pot or toss it in the pressure cooker. The sides are ready. Maybe add a side salad or steam some frozen veggies?
 
2018-02-09 02:31:52 PM  

anustart: AlanMooresBeard: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.

I have to disagree.  I think we're not considering practical issues in many homes, especially lower-income homes.

A common scenario:
-Mom gets up at 6, makes breakfast, packs lunches, leaves at 8 and works 9-6, home by 7
-Dad gets up at 5:30, leaves at 6 and works 7-4, home by 4:30
-Kids need to be ready for school by 7:45 each morning
-Kids get home from school at 4:30
-Kids need help with homework in the evenings
-Kids need to be in bed at 8:30
-Housework and laundry have to be done
-Shopping has to be done
-Basic errands take a long time because the family relies on the bus
-Parent's have managed to manage the budget to let Susan play soccer on Tuesday evenings and give Billy piano lessons on Thursdays after school.
-Kids need (and have a right to) down-time for playing and fun.

It's easy to see where you might find it extremely difficult to have time for a healthy meal prepared from scratch. An hour in the evening can be very hard to come by.  It's not surprising that using prepared foods can be frequently the only way to manage the hours in a day.

This has nothing to do with laziness, lack of information or parenting skills. it has everything to do with the way we have designed so much of our economy and life structure around things that make it harder, not easier, to make family life a priority.


You and your farking login.  Every single time.
 
2018-02-09 02:39:28 PM  

anustart: Thong_of_Zardoz: anustart: Thong_of_Zardoz: Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".

[img.fark.net image 250x250]

I'm not trolling. It was a comment on what people prioritize in their lives.

My bad, I didn't realize you were one of those "Fark low-income families because they spend all their money on iPhones and big-screen TVs!" types.  My apologies for thinking better of you. I'll try not to do it again.


That's OK. Just don't let it happen again. "Farkie" me in your most unflattering colour so you'll know you can disregard anything I say from now on.
 
2018-02-09 02:53:50 PM  

anustart: AlanMooresBeard: AlanMooresBeard: Its laziness.

Eating healthy with minimal cooking and prep time is a lot cheaper than people assume.
It takes effort to learn about vitamins and nutrition.
It takes effort to plan out your meals.
It takes effort to learn cooking skills.
It takes effort to figure out the real cost of eating healthy.

Or people can just by a box of mac and cheese and a rotisserie chicken and biatch how they are a victim of the food industry.

I'll add, if one doesn't care about healthy food then that is fine. We all have different goals, needs and wants.
My post was targeted to the "But it costs too much money and takes too much time" crowd.

I have to disagree.  I think we're not considering practical issues in many homes, especially lower-income homes.

A common scenario:
-Mom gets up at 6, makes breakfast, packs lunches, leaves at 8 and works 9-6, home by 7
-Dad gets up at 5:30, leaves at 6 and works 7-4, home by 4:30
-Kids need to be ready for school by 7:45 each morning
-Kids get home from school at 4:30
-Kids need help with homework in the evenings
-Kids need to be in bed at 8:30
-Housework and laundry have to be done
-Shopping has to be done
-Basic errands take a long time because the family relies on the bus
-Parent's have managed to manage the budget to let Susan play soccer on Tuesday evenings and give Billy piano lessons on Thursdays after school.
-Kids need (and have a right to) down-time for playing and fun.

It's easy to see where you might find it extremely difficult to have time for a healthy meal prepared from scratch. An hour in the evening can be very hard to come by.  It's not surprising that using prepared foods can be frequently the only way to manage the hours in a day.

This has nothing to do with laziness, lack of information or parenting skills. it has everything to do with the way we have designed so much of our economy and life structure around things that make it harder, not easier, to make family life a priority.


Took Fark long enough to drag out the "This specific example refutes you and thusly you're wrong." Why not make the dad blind, mom working 2 jobs, and toss in grandma while you are at it?
Yeah raising a family is tough and you can go blame society but that doesn't change my point.

If after everything you listed, and anything you want to add to your list, the parents make an uninformed assumption where they won't try, then yes they are being lazy.
 
2018-02-09 02:58:09 PM  

Thong_of_Zardoz: Hey man. Yearly cellphone upgrades and unlimited data plans ain't free. Someone's gotta work to get that "quality of life".


STFU already with the whining about cellphones.  What is it with conservatives and their horror of poor people owning cellphones?

Why not also mention flat-screen TV sets and buying lobster and malt liquor with food stamps while wearing a mink coat and then driving away in a Cadillac?

/keep recycling those dead old Reagan myths
 
2018-02-09 03:10:00 PM  

born_yesterday: You and your farking login.  Every single time.


LOL.

Umm....sorry?
 
2018-02-09 03:13:59 PM  

AlanMooresBeard: Took Fark long enough to drag out the "This specific example refutes you and thusly you're wrong." Why not make the dad blind, mom working 2 jobs, and toss in grandma while you are at it?


Because if i did that, you'd be absolutely right to say that I was cherry-picking.  My example is very generic and probably closely reflects what happens in millions of households every day.  Just because it doesn't happen in YOUR household doesn't make it an unrealistic representation of a lot of other families.
 
2018-02-09 03:20:59 PM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: One thing I've become acutely aware of in the past few years is how geography and health are correlated. I grew up in Kansas and my family is from southern Indiana, two places where obesity is a visible obvious epidemic. Here in Colorado, obesity is the exception. My children have lived most of their lives in this culture, so when we travel, one the first things they notice is how fat the rest of the country is in comparison. Colorado grocery stores are filled with the same garbage as grocery stores in the rest of the country, and we have the same high-calorie restaurants as you'll find elsewhere. It just comes down to a different culture. We're not genetically superior in Colorado. A lot of us just choose to live healthy lifestyles.


In fact, it's the altitude keeping you mostly thin as opposed to grossly obese.

Lost 5 solid pounds (not water weight) staying there for a week at 7,000 feet, and I don't normally have 5 pounds extra to lose, let alone on vacation.
 
2018-02-09 03:28:32 PM  

smd31: I was doing my normal grocery shopping last night and was looking at getting a different spaghetti sauce than I usually get (Ragu Italian Sausage and Garlic).  Found one I was interested in and it was "organic" or whatever (all natural, no added sugar, etc, small company).  I was like, sure I'll try it once...then I looked at the price.  $6.50 for 1 jar?!?!  Haha no....no thanks, I'll stick with my $2 jar.  If it had been $3 or 4


If you have a blender, this is quick, cheap, and tastes better than the cheap jarred stuff.

Blend the following:

2 cans of diced tomatoes
1 can of tomato paste
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup parmesan cheese (the crappy powdered stuff in a can)

If you have it, add some jarred banana pepper rings along with the marinate. It increases yumminess by quite a bit, but it's perfectly fine without. (Banana pepper rings also jazz up cheap frozen pizzas by quite a bit)
 
2018-02-09 03:35:27 PM  

BullBearMS: Crock pots require at least enough ability to think ahead that you have the ingredients on hand in the morning so you can toss them in the crock pot before you leave the house for work.


And then the damn thing shuts off if there's even a slight power surge. Great safety feature there - out with the fire hazard, in with the salmonella.
 
2018-02-09 03:39:09 PM  
Oh, here's a good source for side dish recipes.

This guy taught at a cooking school, so some of it's a bit fancy, but he also has good recipes for the classics.

Chef John's Side Dish Recipes

He also has a Youtube channel (which Allrecipes.com purchased)

Best Macaroni Salad Ever - How to Make Deli-Style Macaroni Salad
Youtube jEo9VXYVrxs
 
2018-02-09 03:50:26 PM  

Gulper Eel: BullBearMS: Crock pots require at least enough ability to think ahead that you have the ingredients on hand in the morning so you can toss them in the crock pot before you leave the house for work.

And then the damn thing shuts off if there's even a slight power surge. Great safety feature there - out with the fire hazard, in with the salmonella.


I hear ya.  I thought the newfangled electronic one where you could set the cooking duration sounded nifty till it periodically resets itself for no reason I could see.

Sometimes, going old school is best.  I still have my Mom's old Rival crockpot with the stoneware insert from the freaking 70's that will never die.  One of these works fine with it.

5fc98fa113f6897cea53-06dfa63be377ed632ae798753ae0fb3f.ssl.cf2.rackcdn.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 03:52:50 PM  

anustart: AlanMooresBeard: Took Fark long enough to drag out the "This specific example refutes you and thusly you're wrong." Why not make the dad blind, mom working 2 jobs, and toss in grandma while you are at it?

Because if i did that, you'd be absolutely right to say that I was cherry-picking.  My example is very generic and probably closely reflects what happens in millions of households every day.  Just because it doesn't happen in YOUR household doesn't make it an unrealistic representation of a lot of other families.


You take a census or a poll to determine that millions of families rely on a bus to take their kids to piano and soccer practice?

If the parents make an uninformed assumption where they won't try, then yes they are being lazy
 
2018-02-09 03:57:12 PM  

fictional_character: The Dog Ate My Homework: One thing I've become acutely aware of in the past few years is how geography and health are correlated. I grew up in Kansas and my family is from southern Indiana, two places where obesity is a visible obvious epidemic. Here in Colorado, obesity is the exception. My children have lived most of their lives in this culture, so when we travel, one the first things they notice is how fat the rest of the country is in comparison. Colorado grocery stores are filled with the same garbage as grocery stores in the rest of the country, and we have the same high-calorie restaurants as you'll find elsewhere. It just comes down to a different culture. We're not genetically superior in Colorado. A lot of us just choose to live healthy lifestyles.

In fact, it's the altitude keeping you mostly thin as opposed to grossly obese.

Lost 5 solid pounds (not water weight) staying there for a week at 7,000 feet, and I don't normally have 5 pounds extra to lose, let alone on vacation.


Interesting. I had never heard of this and had to go google it cause it sounded ridiculous. Thanks for passing this on.
 
2018-02-09 04:13:49 PM  
I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.
 
2018-02-09 04:20:55 PM  

Wave Of Anal Fury: No sh*t.  I live in a college town, which is affluent and well-educated.  And every time I go grocery shopping, I see people with shopping carts full of poor food choices.  Processed over fresh.  Junk food over healthy.

People like what they like, which is usually what they grew up with.  And because we've had an unhealthy diet for a couple generations now, what people grew up with is crap.


THIS. I got the stink-eye for buying steak and fresh veggies when I got SNAP. That steak and potatoes and onion and bell peppers got turned into 9 meals and frozen.$30 lasted me two farking weeks.
 
2018-02-09 04:26:14 PM  

Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.


Your honor. The prosecution would like to introduce Exhibit A.

Alright you guys have fun in this thread. I'm out.
 
2018-02-09 04:57:08 PM  

Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.


Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.
 
2018-02-09 05:21:24 PM  

BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.


This. I'm trying to learn on my own but it's time consuming and I'm not very good at it yet. I figure it will be worth it in the long run but I'm in over my head right now. I can make simple meals. The stuff I make is edible, mostly, but rather bland. I'm just learning how to cook a good steak but I have no idea about spices or how to make most things from scratch. There's a cost involved in learning to cook too. I don't have a kitchen decked out with fancy gadgets and the best cookware and can't afford a bunch of new stuff so I make due with what I have. The other thing is waste. Fresh food spoils. There's been a bit of learning curve figuring out how much to buy at a time. This would be a lot easier if I had someone to show me the ropes or I could afford to take some classes.
 
2018-02-09 05:52:14 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-09 06:50:32 PM  

MechaPyx: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay. Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs? I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch. This. I'm trying to learn on my own but it's time consuming and I'm not very good at it yet. I figure it will be worth it in the long run but I'm in over my head right now. I can make simple meals. The stuff I make is edible, mostly, but rather bland. I'm just learning how to cook a good steak but I have no idea about spices or how to make most things from scratch. There's a cost involved in learning to cook too. I don't have a kitchen decked out with fancy gadgets and the best cookware and can't afford a bunch of new stuff so I make due with what I have. The other thing is waste. Fresh food spoils. There's been a bit of learning curve figuring out how much to buy at a time. This would be a lot easier if I had someone to show me the ropes or I could afford to take some classes.


Give Chef John's stuff a try.

He's got the written recipe on his blog and then on his youtube channel you can watch him make the dish so you know what you're in for.

Like I said earlier, some of his stuff is kind of fancy, but he also hits a lot of popular regional dishes and plain old staple foods.


Swedish Meatballs Recipe -- Beef & Pork Meatballs with Creamy Brown Gravy
Youtube 55MIeoPaBC4


Also, there's some nice humor in the videos to keep them from being dull.
 
2018-02-09 07:07:07 PM  

Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.


Rice, beans, chicken and some vegetables are a budget buster?
 
2018-02-09 07:09:16 PM  
s3-media3.fl.yelpcdn.comView Full Size


Grocery selection, Dollar Tree
 
2018-02-09 07:25:19 PM  
I saw a number recently on the cost difference between unhealthy and healthy food and it was surprisingly small.  For the very poor, this makes a difference, but for the well-to-do working and middle classes, it makes no real difference. A few percent either way on say, 20% of your diet won't break you.

I problem is that if healthy is defined as fresh, a lot more healthy food is thrown away than canned, frozen or dehydrated food. I know from my own experience that I throw away a lot of "healthy" food because it wilts, spoils, gets stale or simply sits there too long.

You need to be able to pick up the tiny bottle of peanut butter or mayonnaise, ignore the fruit and vegetables you are not going to eat, and leave the baked goods in the bakery. Then start eating a little bit more until you are sure you can eat what you buy and buy what you eat.

I used to throw away nearly full bottles of commercially prepared mayonnaise because I didn't want to get food-poisoning. I now realize that that mayonnaise is so full of vinegar, fat, salt, sugar and other excellent preservatives that I could leave the bootle out on a shelf instead of keeping it in the refrigerator, and if I do keep it in the fridge, it is nearly indestructible and might survive a nuclear explosion better than Indiana Jones, which is to say miraculously.
 
2018-02-09 07:36:24 PM  
 
2018-02-09 07:37:42 PM  

Number 216: Please tell me there's a recipe for that monstrosity. Looks like a bacon explosion but filled with chili and mac and cheese


I would guess that you make macaroni and cheese, and chili if you want. Then make a bacon weave and wrap that bacon weave around the mac/cheese/chili burrito-style.

Krieghund: Because eating some roughage every once in awhile helps you take some quality shiats?


This is why things like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, carrots, and green beans exist. All these are much tastier than iceberg lettuce with ranch dressing on it, at least IMHO.

ZeroPly: Because colorectal cancer sorta sucks, and nothing tastes so good that it's worth having to regularly dump out a colostomy bag?


Eating nothing but bacon burritos would probably have bad effects on your health. I think there's room for most people to eat a bacon burrito a few times a year without getting colon cancer though.
 
2018-02-09 07:40:19 PM  

BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.


WTF is wrong with you dude?? When I was growing up my mom used to make BIG pots of that shiat...she called them "soup beans" my parents allegedly loved them. They were disgusting. I suspect this was a money saving thing, but to this day, I will never eat any kind of bean that is in any kind of soup (outside chilli)
 
2018-02-09 07:48:45 PM  

Geoff Peterson: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

WTF is wrong with you dude?? When I was growing up my mom used to make BIG pots of that shiat...she called them "soup beans" my parents allegedly loved them. They were disgusting. I suspect this was a money saving thing, but to this day, I will never eat any kind of bean that is in any kind of soup (outside chilli)


I've found the problem. Your mom can't cook.
 
2018-02-09 07:51:08 PM  

MechaPyx: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

This. I'm trying to learn on my own but it's time consuming and I'm not very good at it yet. I figure it will be worth it in the long run but I'm in over my head right now. I can make simple meals. The stuff I make is edible, mostly, but rather bland. I'm just learning how to cook a good steak but I have no idea about spices or how to make most things from scratch. There's a cost involved in learning to cook too. I don't have a kitchen decked out with fancy gadgets and the best cookware and can't afford a bunch of new stuff so I make due with what I have. The other thing is waste. Fresh food spoils. There's been a bit of learning curve figuring out how much to buy at a time. This would be a lot easier if I had someone to show me the ropes or I could afford to take some classes.


I have THE CRAPPIEST food processor out there and access to a Cub foods.

 Learn how to make 3 good sauces to throw on anything, you're golden.
Thai peanut sauce (I posted a recipe up in the thread)
Pesto
Tomato sauce.

That's it.  Just make a basic batch of anything, rice and beans, pasta and veggies, quinoa and chicken breasts, whatever, and throw some sauce over it.

Don't let cooking intimidate you.  It's easier than you think.
 
2018-02-09 07:52:59 PM  

MechaPyx: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

This. I'm trying to learn on my own but it's time consuming and I'm not very good at it yet. I figure it will be worth it in the long run but I'm in over my head right now. I can make simple meals. The stuff I make is edible, mostly, but rather bland. I'm just learning how to cook a good steak but I have no idea about spices or how to make most things from scratch. There's a cost involved in learning to cook too. I don't have a kitchen decked out with fancy gadgets and the best cookware and can't afford a bunch of new stuff so I make due with what I have. The other thing is waste. Fresh food spoils. There's been a bit of learning curve figuring out how much to buy at a time. This would be a lot easier if I had someone to show me the ropes or I could afford to take some classes.


Also, as to waste:. Freezer freezer freezer.  Get some Ziploc bags, portion everything out, defrost whatever you need.
 
2018-02-09 07:58:09 PM  

feralbaby: Also, as to waste:. Freezer freezer freezer. Get some Ziploc bags, portion everything out, defrost whatever you need.


Yup. If there is anything you learn fast from shopping at Costco/Sams Club, etc.

Don't buy produce unless you intend to cook it first.
Don't buy large amounts of things that spoil unless it freezes well.
 
2018-02-09 09:39:33 PM  

Geoff Peterson: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

WTF is wrong with you dude?? When I was growing up my mom used to make BIG pots of that shiat...she called them "soup beans" my parents allegedly loved them. They were disgusting. I suspect this was a money saving thing, but to this day, I will never eat any kind of bean that is in any kind of soup (outside chilli)


When I was a kid, meatloaf was ground beef stuffed in a breadpan with ketchup squirted on top, baked to medium well.

Just because it's the way your parents made it, doesn't mean it's "right" or "tasty".
 
2018-02-09 09:47:22 PM  

Thingster: Geoff Peterson: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

WTF is wrong with you dude?? When I was growing up my mom used to make BIG pots of that shiat...she called them "soup beans" my parents allegedly loved them. They were disgusting. I suspect this was a money saving thing, but to this day, I will never eat any kind of bean that is in any kind of soup (outside chilli)

When I was a kid, meatloaf was ground beef stuffed in a breadpan with ketchup squirted on top, baked to medium well.

Just because it's the way your parents made it, doesn't mean it's "right" or "tasty".


There are certain foods I can't eat to this day b/c my mom's recipe was so bad. Michael Symon could make meatloaf, and I'd still have trouble getting excited about it. Beef stroganof is the other. But my grandmother's manicotti, now that shiat was awesome.
 
2018-02-09 09:57:48 PM  

Trocadero: Thingster: Geoff Peterson: BullBearMS: Geoff Peterson: I dont care what anyone says. Eating healthy is more expensive. it just is. and the healthier you eat, the more you pay.

Do you have any idea how cheap a big bag of pinto beans are or how much better they are for you than french fries despite also being carbs?

I think a large part of the problem is that people have relied on convenience foods for so long that we no longer pass on how to cook from scratch.

WTF is wrong with you dude?? When I was growing up my mom used to make BIG pots of that shiat...she called them "soup beans" my parents allegedly loved them. They were disgusting. I suspect this was a money saving thing, but to this day, I will never eat any kind of bean that is in any kind of soup (outside chilli)

When I was a kid, meatloaf was ground beef stuffed in a breadpan with ketchup squirted on top, baked to medium well.

Just because it's the way your parents made it, doesn't mean it's "right" or "tasty".

There are certain foods I can't eat to this day b/c my mom's recipe was so bad. Michael Symon could make meatloaf, and I'd still have trouble getting excited about it. Beef stroganof is the other. But my grandmother's manicotti, now that shiat was awesome.


I totally understand.  Meatloaf and green bean casserole.

Meat loaf was as above, green bean casserole (from my Grandma) was 2 cans green beans, 1 can cream of mushroom soup, 1 can onion crisps, in oven, bake.

/Make a killer meatloaf and a green bean casserole that will shut down the conversation at dinner
//It's how I really expanded my cooking horizons; how to make everything my mom and maternal grandmother made palatable
///Dad was a hell of a cook, so I had solid fundamentals.
 
2018-02-09 10:21:35 PM  

Trocadero: There are certain foods I can't eat to this day b/c my mom's recipe was so bad.


My mother absolutely ruined any cut of meat she got her hands on by overcooking it until it was just inedible.

It made you long for deep fried or boiled meats because anything baked, broiled, or pan fried was just inedible.

Meanwhile, Dad liked his meats pretty much slightly warmed and bloody.

I had to start cooking early out of self defense. :oP
 
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