If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Saveur)   How a poisonous and toxic plant become a staple on the American South's dinner plate   ( saveur.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Pokeweed, poke sallet, poke berries, crushed poke berries, raw pokeweed, County Poke Sallet, passionate pokeweed detractor, wild pokeweed  
•       •       •

14152 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Feb 2018 at 12:50 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



175 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-02-08 12:40:53 PM  
My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.
 
2018-02-08 12:40:58 PM  
I subscribe to a lot of magazines, but Saveur is always my favorite each time it comes in. Great writing and some amazing recipes. Find a discounted subscription. Very worth it.
 
2018-02-08 12:41:19 PM  
Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.
 
2018-02-08 12:44:49 PM  
I've always wondered about the first person who decided to eat something, discovered it was poisonous, then the next person decided to fart around with it to try and make it edible. For ... reasons?

"Hey, Bubba, come over here, I boiled this with some salt, try some and see if it makes you shiat or something!"

*eats... drops dead*

"Well, that didn't work. Maybe if I boil it a THIRD time! Yea! That's the ticket!"
 
2018-02-08 12:45:13 PM  

MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:45:40 PM  
Tony Joe White - Polk Salad Annie
Youtube fRF24LY5pvw
 
2018-02-08 12:46:30 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.


I guess it depends where in the South you grew up.  I've been eating poke ever since I can remember.
 
2018-02-08 12:47:27 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:48:48 PM  

RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]


You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.
 
2018-02-08 12:50:56 PM  

Lucky LaRue: Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.

I guess it depends where in the South you grew up.  I've been eating poke ever since I can remember.


But would you call it a staple food?  I've eaten all sorts of things - and liked them.  Eagerly awaited their arrival in whatever season.  But I wouldn't call Ogeechee shad, for instance, a staple food.  Certainly not a staple food for the entire American South.
 
2018-02-08 12:51:55 PM  

MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.


As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.
 
2018-02-08 12:53:49 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Lucky LaRue: Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.

I guess it depends where in the South you grew up.  I've been eating poke ever since I can remember.

But would you call it a staple food?  I've eaten all sorts of things - and liked them.  Eagerly awaited their arrival in whatever season.  But I wouldn't call Ogeechee shad, for instance, a staple food.  Certainly not a staple food for the entire American South.


Nah - it's not a staple food.  I suppose if you were dirt-poor,  you might eat it more regularly, but even my family (who were pretty poor hillbillies) only ate it in the spring time.
 
2018-02-08 12:54:40 PM  

Lucky LaRue: MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.

As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.


That menu identifies you as a true hillbilly. Yankees and flatlanders wouldn't understand.
 
2018-02-08 12:54:50 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.


From Arkansas, and it was on the table as soon as it came on all over my area.
 
2018-02-08 12:54:58 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: "Staple", my ass.


That's weird.  But different strokes for different folks...  Come here and bend over.
 
2018-02-08 12:55:32 PM  
Roadkill is also a staple food in parts of the South
 
2018-02-08 12:56:22 PM  
Venomous

/pet peave
 
2018-02-08 12:56:45 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.


I wouldn't call it a "staple" but there are those of our Southern Brethren that love Poke Salad (or Sallet if you prefer). Hell a simple Google or Bing search would show Poke Salad festivals all over the South.

Just cause your Southern Family didn't do/eat something doesn't mean it isn't common.
 
2018-02-08 12:57:16 PM  

Lucky LaRue: MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.

As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.


I have eaten poke.  My hillbilly relatives cook it all the time and it is good.
Now, the way we always make it is to heat up the bacon grease and cut it with a little apple cider vinegar and add pepper.  Of course, you can't *really* enjoy poke without fried potatoes and onions.  If you are fixing the fried potatoes and onions, there is time to bake corn bread.  So I get you, Lucky.  I get you.
I AM SO HUNGRY FOR POKE NOW.
 
2018-02-08 12:58:05 PM  

abhorrent1: Venomous

/pet peave


cdn.newsapi.com.auView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:58:25 PM  

Lucky LaRue: Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.

I guess it depends where in the South you grew up.  I've been eating poke ever since I can remember.


I can remember very well as a kid eating this. I liked it and we had fun picking it.
/ grew up in southwest TN
 
2018-02-08 12:58:46 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/fRF24LY5​pvw]


Foo Fighters with Tony Joe White 'Polk Salad Annie' David Letterman
Youtube sCPYbys5yRY
 
2018-02-08 12:59:27 PM  
People eat that shiat?  The only use it has is making ink from the berries to sell to to hipster jerk-offs. Black Walnut is good for that too.  Of course, I moved outta the south before the side-effects of living there became permanent.
 
2018-02-08 12:59:41 PM  
Anything is survival food if you're brave enough.
 
2018-02-08 01:00:04 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.


Found the rich southern kid.
 
2018-02-08 01:00:20 PM  

Lucky LaRue: MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.

As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.


Having read that, I miss my grandfather. He built his first fence by jamming ocotillo cuttings on the edge of an irrigation ditch. His way of gathering food in the high desert was to lay on his back till buzzards started circling. When one peaked out on a circling climb, he whipped up his .22 and shot the thing dead. He loved buzzard.
 
2018-02-08 01:00:23 PM  
So that explains quite a bit about the south

Intestinal worms and toxic greens

how about some hemlock tea while you are at it.
 
2018-02-08 01:00:54 PM  
Poisonous and toxic?! Those are the worst.
 
2018-02-08 01:01:08 PM  
How would it become a staple in some regions?

1. It's a weed. Thus it's widely available and grows for free.
2. It's a weed. Being a weed, it requires literally zero cultivation. You need to murder it, not support it. (see mint)
3. It's a weed. It's fast growing and large.

With effort it can be rendered edible. It fills a similar niche as kale or collard/mustard greens -- bitter, hardy greens that require cooking.

This one is more interesting as a source of dye than as a food, but it can be used as a food source of last resort.
 
2018-02-08 01:01:36 PM  
ITT are all the rednecks.
 
2018-02-08 01:02:02 PM  

mrwhippy: So that explains quite a bit about the south

Intestinal worms and toxic greens

how about some hemlock tea while you are at it.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 01:02:17 PM  
Something about those plants gross me out.
 
2018-02-08 01:02:54 PM  
It doesn't stop people from eating rhubarb, either.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:03 PM  
Incidentally, it's pretty northern, too. It's all over Philadelphia. Rumor has it, the Declaration was written using a mix of clay and pokeweed ink. The berries are really pretty, but comically toxic. Treat it like nightshade.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:13 PM  
Never liked it myself, but my dad and uncles sure did. My father's family was pure eastern Kentucky.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:32 PM  

Anastacya: I've always wondered about the first person who decided to eat something, discovered it was poisonous, then the next person decided to fart around with it to try and make it edible. For ... reasons?

"Hey, Bubba, come over here, I boiled this with some salt, try some and see if it makes you shiat or something!"

*eats... drops dead*

"Well, that didn't work. Maybe if I boil it a THIRD time! Yea! That's the ticket!"


Tapioca...had to be really determined.  Even after it's not poisonous.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:35 PM  

Subtonic: People eat that shiat?  The only use it has is making ink from the berries to sell to to hipster jerk-offs. Black Walnut is good for that too.  Of course, I moved outta the south before the side-effects of living there became permanent.


Yes... it is very good boiled then fried in bacon grease. But then again, anything is good cooked in bacon grease.

The one thing I can't stomach to eat here is ramps.  Nasty ass things.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:40 PM  
my mom made some last spring and was talking about making some just a couple of days ago when they sprout here soon.
/but i would not call it a staple food
 
2018-02-08 01:03:50 PM  
Maybe I'm oversimplifying but I'm assuming people started eating it because they were starving.  When you're poor I would assume you're going to be much more likely to try new things and if it doesn't kill you then you'll keep eating it.  Kind of reminds me of the eating of clay in the south to supplement poor diets and get the minerals you body is craving.
 
2018-02-08 01:04:10 PM  
Poke to me means raw tuna and some other stuff (onions, kukui, sesame seeds...)  in a sauce, like shoyu.

It's good to be on the Paciifc coast as far as seafood is concerned.
 
2018-02-08 01:04:19 PM  
Been living in the south for my whole life and nobody over here has so much as heard of this.
 
2018-02-08 01:04:20 PM  

This text is now purple: Incidentally, it's pretty northern, too. It's all over Philadelphia. Rumor has it, the Declaration was written using a mix of clay and pokeweed ink. The berries are really pretty, but comically toxic. Treat it like nightshade.


Username checks out.
 
2018-02-08 01:04:56 PM  
Is this the thing the pig gets stuck in?
 
2018-02-08 01:05:14 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Lucky LaRue: MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.

As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.

Having read that, I miss my grandfather. He built his first fence by jamming ocotillo cuttings on the edge of an irrigation ditch. His way of gathering food in the high desert was to lay on his back till buzzards started circling. When one peaked out on a circling climb, he whipped up his .22 and shot the thing dead. He loved buzzard.


I hope this is a true story. I will think of it as such, regardless.
 
2018-02-08 01:05:21 PM  
Are we not making double entendres about poking our weeds or sumpin'?
 
2018-02-08 01:05:41 PM  
Hmmmm poke sallet..  grows wild around here and if you had grand parents.or parents from the depression, you know this plant and how to prepare it.
 
2018-02-08 01:06:02 PM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Something about those plants gross me out.


They are also hardy as fark. Have tried to remove a few from around my house and they keep coming back.
 
2018-02-08 01:06:17 PM  

MrBallou: Lucky LaRue: MrBallou: RJReves: MrBallou: My hillbilly Grandmother insisted on feeding us all "a mess of poke" as soon as it came out in the spring as a spring tonic, but she loved it all season long.

Its taste is strong and a little harsh, but you grow to like it. You have to get the young leaves as they come out. Never use full grown ones.

[img.fark.net image 700x480]

You joke, but supposedly the bitterness of the poke (Appalachian hillbillies never call it 'sallet' - that's a Deep South thing) helps cut through the greasy gaminess of possum, but I was never fortunate enough to be around when it was served.

As a hillbilly, I can't say I've ever eaten poke with possum (I've never eaten possum at all for that matter), but poke is really good wilted with hot bacon grease and served with fried taters, brown beans, and cornbread.

That menu identifies you as a true hillbilly. Yankees and flatlanders wouldn't understand.


My mom's family got to Southern WV in the 1780s.  Dad's family got there in the 1850s.  Neither clan ever left.
 
2018-02-08 01:06:51 PM  
My grandparents grew up dirt poor in southern Indiana, and ate poke weed bc it was the first edible thing to grow in the Spring. They would spend the winter eating eating only beans and potatoes so anything else to eat was welcome at that point.

They talked about in a tone of "thank God we don't have to do that anymore" so I was never tempted to try it myself.
 
2018-02-08 01:07:41 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bullshiat.  I'm from the American South, and I have never once heard of "poke sallet", nor have I ever eaten pokeweed.  This is just another example of something some Southerner living in New York points out to make herself feel less unsophisticated.  "Oh yeah - we eat this unknown thing. Poke sallet.  You've probably never heard of it."

"Staple", my ass.


And don't get me started on the heresy that is the "Instant" Grit.
 
Displayed 50 of 175 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report