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(Guardian)   From the Guardian, ground-breaking information that "news is bad for you, and giving up the news will make you a happier person"   ( theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Guardian, The Times, The Guardian, News, Ricky Gervais, Media  
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1477 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Feb 2018 at 12:35 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-02-08 11:38:17 AM  
"Foolish is the man who never reads a newspaper; even more foolish is the man who believes what he reads just because it is in the newspaper."-August von Schlözer, German historian and publicist (1735-1809).

There's a huge amount of information-true and false, useful and worthless, harmless and dangerous- that's now available, thanks to modern technology. It's really a matter of being very selective about what you consider worthy of your attention.
 
2018-02-08 11:46:46 AM  
I blame Fox News. Awareness of reality is a good thing. Being fed a daily diet of fear, schism, and distortion of reality is not.
 
2018-02-08 11:47:56 AM  
I remember when I went on holiday, to the USA ironically, where I was no longer inundated with news about Trumpian and Brexit nonsense. I was genuinely much happier after. But that could just have been because I was on holiday, doing holiday stuff. I definitely felt that not reading anger inducing stuff in the news contributed... naturally I came home and subscribed to a year of TF.

Damn you Drew and your clever marketing!
 
2018-02-08 11:57:20 AM  

Galileo's Daughter: It's really a matter of being very selective about what you consider worthy of your attention.


Which is sort of a problem when you're being inundated with news all the time.
 
2018-02-08 12:13:30 PM  
Well, *I* get all my news from TFD. I am so well infromed.
 
2018-02-08 12:17:54 PM  
Hey, Guardian.  "Ignorance is bliss" was not meant to be taken as life advice.
 
2018-02-08 12:36:54 PM  

Psychopusher: Hey, Guardian.  "Ignorance is bliss" was not meant to be taken as life advice.


"Caring about stupid shiat you can't control" is pretty solid stuff, in my opinion, personally, just my two cents, in my opinion.
 
2018-02-08 12:39:58 PM  
Good thing I read Fark...
 
2018-02-08 12:41:29 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:42:07 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:44:16 PM  
My wife has been addicted to watching the news a lot  lately. Mostly MSNBC and Morning Joe. I have to make her turn it off. I try to tell her Watergate took 3 years. She's ready to see Twitler deposed
 
2018-02-08 12:44:28 PM  
Which is why I get my news - or at least links to news articles - from Fark and Slashdot.  If something really cool/interesting is happening, I check the CSM site.
 
2018-02-08 12:46:04 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:46:21 PM  

Galileo's Daughter: There's a huge amount of information-true and false, useful and worthless, harmless and dangerous- that's now available, thanks to modern technology. It's really a matter of being very selective about what you consider worthy of your attention.


Which is why I only pay attention to Fark, funny cat videos, and Ow My Balls.
 
2018-02-08 12:47:46 PM  
This article rings true to me.
 
2018-02-08 12:48:31 PM  
I get my news here and from Reddit links, so meh. I like this site for news because it's usually a little funny, and there's almost always someone around with either direct experience or is actually an expert on he topic. Seems to be more common as the average farker gets older.
 
2018-02-08 12:49:39 PM  
Therefore, #fakenews is, through the discipline of abductive reasoning, either good or bad for you. Which is possibly nice.
 
2018-02-08 12:49:43 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: [img.fark.net image 310x203]


media.rbl.msView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 12:50:50 PM  
Guardian readership still collapsing?
 
2018-02-08 12:53:53 PM  
Ignorance is bliss, but mostly it's ignorance.
 
2018-02-08 12:56:10 PM  
So, ignorance is essentially strength. Wait, that sounds familiar.
 
2018-02-08 01:01:16 PM  
It grinds us down until we adopt a worldview that is pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic. The scientific term is "learned helplessness". It's a bit of a stretch, but I would not be surprised if news consumption, at least partially contributes to the widespread disease of depression.

It wouldn't surprise me either. At the very least, it does nothing to help.

I was diagnosed with depression at seventeen years of age, and have been battling it for over thirty years. I tend to watch out for things that make my mood worse, and news does just that. It's mostly horrible stuff that's completely out of my control. Maybe some people can just turn-off their ability to have it affect them emotionally, I find I do better if I avoid much of the negative input in the first place.

Mind you, I don't avoid the news entirely, thus I'm still pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic.
 
2018-02-08 01:01:36 PM  
Over the years I worked with a lot of people that just seemed happy knowing who the president was and that was enough. As long as their iThing worked, sports were being played and they had food they seemed happy enough and didn't want anything messing with that.
Knew one girl whose goal in life it was to snag a rich husband and sit at home shooting out kids. It was funny she had this long list of all the qualities this mystery man needed, if he had half of them any woman would be lucky. But it was all or nothing for her, she may be a crazy dog lady one day.

Every now and then I need to take a break from the news because it just stresses me out and I do need to sit back and relax so I don't stroke out or something.
 
2018-02-08 01:03:44 PM  
I started doing this as sort of an informal New Year's Resolution - not stop entirely keeping up with the news, but drastically reduce the amount I watch/read.  Since Trump got elected, I was following the news almost every waking hour.  I didn't think it was positive.  You get a sort of grumpy old man attitude.  You spend time talking about it and arguing with colleagues/friends/acquintances who are also into politics.  Frankly it's all pointless.  Other than voting in future elections, I can't influence what's going on - I can only deal with what happens in my life.  So yeah, I agree with this article.
 
2018-02-08 01:16:34 PM  
I've started observing Uposatha during the week, and have found that even just a day off from most media is really nice on the brain.
Other than a glance at the headlines just to see if I should bother getting dress and then I stick to educational things.
It's really quite nice, I may start just having one day I give to look at current events and leave the others for more useful things.
 
2018-02-08 01:18:57 PM  
blogs.lse.ac.ukView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 01:19:32 PM  

Psychopusher: Hey, Guardian.  "Ignorance is bliss" was not meant to be taken as life advice.


Considering 95% of things in the news are irrelevant, I don't see how skipping those and just watching the political debates to know what the politicians are up to is harmful.

News: Cat rescued from tree (with picture of cat)
Me: cute, but irrelevant

News: Hurricane heading towards {location}.
Me: And not a single fark was given

News: 10 people died in huge pileup/plane crash/boating accident on {insert highway}
Me: Can't we just skip ahead to the movie?
 
2018-02-08 01:20:22 PM  
I pay attention to the news during the week at work (via Fark) and basically ignore it on the weekend. Doing it during the week passes the time when it's slow or when I need a break from work shiat. It's basically entertainment. On the weekend, I got better shiat to do. It's a nice breather from the cavalcade of stupid that is the current news coverage. The only news I consume at home is local shiat, mostly for the weather and traffic. I don't watch cable news, why the fark would I do that?
 
2018-02-08 01:25:40 PM  
I can't find the quote, but do love the notion that, 'the luxury of living in a functioning democracy is you don't have to pay attention.  Things go on, much as they always have'

However, when someone threatens that democracy (GOP, we're looking at you, but Trump in particular), we have to pay attention.  I literally signed up so that if Trump fires Mueller, I get a notification and can go to a pre-planned rally.

So, despite how angry it makes me, how much it stresses me, I pay attention.  I *need* to know what's going on so I don't let this become the new 'normal' because, seriously, f*ck these people.

The memo from 2009 that was the GOP blueprint for gerrymandering leaked last/this week.  Is that even a news story?

Voter suppression is standard procedure for them, but its dull and difficult to grasp all the angles.  Especially when voter ID sounds reasonable in passing, and you have to look a little deeper to see how its used against people.  Are people even appalled that the Penn GOP considered impeaching their Supreme Court for political reasons?  Or that North Carolina enacted most of the voter restrictions that were rules illegal in the courts?

Same thing with voter registration purges.  A shocking number of people were denied their right to vote last year, but, *shrug* oh well....
 
2018-02-08 01:26:10 PM  

i.r.id10t: Which is why I get my news - or at least links to news articles - from Fark and Slashdot.  If something really cool/interesting is happening, I check the CSM site.


Slashdot?  That site is a shell of its former self.  I used to go there daily for years and it took me too long to realize how bad it had become.
 
2018-02-08 01:28:42 PM  
A woman I know had an accident resulting in a minor concussion, and at the hospital they asked her "basic" questions like her name, what day it was and who is the Prime Minister (Aussie here). Her reply to the last one was "I don't know and I don't care". Which is exactly what she would have said prior to the head injury.

I can't attest to anyone's deep happiness levels, but she does always appear to be an incredibly cheerful person.
 
2018-02-08 01:50:49 PM  

Mike_LowELL: Psychopusher: Hey, Guardian.  "Ignorance is bliss" was not meant to be taken as life advice.

"Caring about stupid shiat you can't control" is pretty solid stuff, in my opinion, personally, just my two cents, in my opinion.


It isn't always about controlling it in the here and now, but how you react to it when there comes a time that you can do something about it, so you can let the information you have or have access to inform the decisions you make in the future.

Like, I don't know, say, paying attention to current events surrounding the current governance of a certain huge country in the northern hemisphere who is set to hold mid-term elections in just a few months.  The sort of thing that having good information about will help with the decisions that are made during said elections.  You know, that sort of thing.

Information is power.  If you make decisions based on little or no information and those decisions turn out to bite you in the ass as a direct result of having little or not information on which to base those decisions, then you have no one to blame but yourself for the outcome.
 
2018-02-08 01:51:49 PM  

hodet: i.r.id10t: Which is why I get my news - or at least links to news articles - from Fark and Slashdot.  If something really cool/interesting is happening, I check the CSM site.

Slashdot?  That site is a shell of its former self.  I used to go there daily for years and it took me too long to realize how bad it had become.


Yeah but a quick glance at the headlines fills me in on a few things.
 
2018-02-08 01:58:51 PM  

DerAppie: Considering 95% of things in the news are irrelevant, I don't see how skipping those and just watching the political debates to know what the politicians are up to is harmful.


Oh, I'm not saying you shouldn't be selective about what you read -- there's a ton of fluff you really don't need to be reading about unless you're just really farking bored.  But...

News: Cat rescued from tree (with picture of cat)
Me: cute, but irrelevant


True.  Skippable.

News: Hurricane heading towards {location}.
Me: And not a single fark was given


Unless you have friends and/or relatives in {location} and want to make sure they're okay and are evacuating as necessary, or if you are in a position and of a mind to render aid if needed.

News: 10 people died in huge pileup/plane crash/boating accident on {insert highway}
Me: Can't we just skip ahead to the movie?


More niche, sure, but there's always that remote possibility that someone you know may have been involved in said accident.  Highly unlikely about 99.9999% of the time, sure, but you could scan it in a couple of seconds if it seemed relevant to see if it's in a place/at a time where that may be applicable.

As I said, I'm not saying a lot of the crap passing itself off as news is newsworthy or worth your time.  Most of it isn't.  But willful ignorance beyond that point simply for the sake of your personal comfort is not, in my estimation, a healthy way to live in the long run.
 
2018-02-08 02:16:00 PM  
I used to be a major news junkie, especially regarding politics. Then 2016 happened. I started cutting back as things got more and more dismal. In 2017 I kept hoping in the most Pollyanna manner that maybe, just maybe, things would turn around, Trump would stop stumbling over his hair feet, and we would return to some semblance of normality. As things continued to slide downhill I kept tuning in less and less. My curse, though, is that my MIL with Alzheimer's lives with us and she likes the repetition of Fox News. We could change the channel occasionally but she still liked it and kept going back. Then my FIL came to live with us for a couple weeks prior to his getting surgery and he makes Gorka and Bannon sound like Sanders and Michael Moore. Guess what he had on almost 24/7? Here's a hint: it wasn't Al Jazeera.

I'm just going to watch the local news from now on.
 
2018-02-08 02:20:18 PM  

Psychopusher: It isn't always about controlling it in the here and now, but how you react to it when there comes a time that you can do something about it, so you can let the information you have or have access to inform the decisions you make in the future.

Like, I don't know, say, paying attention to current events surrounding the current governance of a certain huge country in the northern hemisphere who is set to hold mid-term elections in just a few months.  The sort of thing that having good information about will help with the decisions that are made during said elections.  You know, that sort of thing.

Information is power.  If you make decisions based on little or no information and those decisions turn out to bite you in the ass as a direct result of having little or not information on which to base those decisions, then you have no one to blame but yourself for the outcome.


You're correct, and that's why I lift weights and read good books and constantly write, and hold a job that's going to put me in position for the next part of my life -- makin' those sweet Wal-Mart greeterbucks -- instead of obsessing over the goofy machinations of a city fifteen-hundred miles away from me, run by people I've never met.

Those are things which are largely out of my control, and yes, they're worth spending the time to look at, much like a trainwreck.  But if you want to be informed, and you want to change your destiny, there's much better places to put your time and energy.

Come into Wal-Mart sometime, and I will say "Hello."  That's how I will make a difference in your life, because you know that down inside, I'm just trying to make you happy.
 
2018-02-08 02:20:43 PM  

Psychopusher: DerAppie: Considering 95% of things in the news are irrelevant, I don't see how skipping those and just watching the political debates to know what the politicians are up to is harmful.

Oh, I'm not saying you shouldn't be selective about what you read -- there's a ton of fluff you really don't need to be reading about unless you're just really farking bored.  But...

News: Cat rescued from tree (with picture of cat)
Me: cute, but irrelevant

True.  Skippable.

News: Hurricane heading towards {location}.
Me: And not a single fark was given

Unless you have friends and/or relatives in {location} and want to make sure they're okay and are evacuating as necessary, or if you are in a position and of a mind to render aid if needed.

News: 10 people died in huge pileup/plane crash/boating accident on {insert highway}
Me: Can't we just skip ahead to the movie?

More niche, sure, but there's always that remote possibility that someone you know may have been involved in said accident.  Highly unlikely about 99.9999% of the time, sure, but you could scan it in a couple of seconds if it seemed relevant to see if it's in a place/at a time where that may be applicable.


On the hurricane:
It is on my friends/family them to keep an eye on the weather. They can then ask me for help if they want, and I will offer it (even t my brother, who I can currently tolerate as I don't speak with/see him more than 5 times a year). I will not per-emptively keep track of everything that could go wrong with my friends and/or family in the off-chance that I might offer them help.

On the accident:
If it was someone I knew, I'd hear about it by other channels. "There was an accident somewhere around that place" is too vague to make any conclusions anyway. Not reading about it in a newspaper means I don't have to worry the 99.9999% of the time it isn't relevant to me. If I don't hear about it, they might not really be friends.

As I said, I'm not saying a lot of the crap passing itself off as news is newsworthy or worth your time. Most of it isn't. But willful ignorance beyond that point simply for the sake of your personal comfort is not, in my estimation, a healthy way to live in the long run.

On that we agree.
 
2018-02-08 02:40:32 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: I pay attention to the news during the week at work (via Fark) and basically ignore it on the weekend. Doing it during the week passes the time when it's slow or when I need a break from work shiat. It's basically entertainment. On the weekend, I got better shiat to do. It's a nice breather from the cavalcade of stupid that is the current news coverage. The only news I consume at home is local shiat, mostly for the weather and traffic. I don't watch cable news, why the fark would I do that?


Holy crap...  It's like you poked into my head and wrote what I was thinking.

The reason I get my news here is that there is generally some vetting that goes on before the story is deemed worth reading.  Yes, this place is left-leaning.  And that does help.

I find myself still having to step away from the news from time to time. Mostly because I start getting really angry when I read about some of the stupid shiat our government is doing, and we are powerless to do a damn thing about it.

Never in my life have I seen things this messed up.

Anyway...  As part of my effort to whittle down to only reasonable news sources, I went and made my own page that puts all the RSS feeds in one place.  And yes, one of the feeds comes from Fark.
 
2018-02-08 02:52:36 PM  

DerAppie: On the hurricane:
It is on my friends/family them to keep an eye on the weather. They can then ask me for help if they want, and I will offer it (even t my brother, who I can currently tolerate as I don't speak with/see him more than 5 times a year). I will not per-emptively keep track of everything that could go wrong with my friends and/or family in the off-chance that I might offer them help.

On the accident:
If it was someone I knew, I'd hear about it by other channels. "There was an accident somewhere around that place" is too vague to make any conclusions anyway. Not reading about it in a newspaper means I don't have to worry the 99.9999% of the time it isn't relevant to me. If I don't hear about it, they might not really be friends.


I know where you're coming from on this -- I'm married to a semi-worry wart who frequently spends time worrying about things that are either beyond her control in any reasonable measure, or haven't and aren't likely to happen in the first place.  I get being prepared and considering future circumstances in order to be prepared for them, and I think that can be quite useful, but there is a line beyond which the returns on such efforts diminish to microscopic, and my wife seems to like living some distance past that line.  It's rubbed up against my much more chill "deal with it if and when it becomes a real possibility or actually happens" attitude more than once, and we tend to agree to let each other deal with such things in our own particular ways.

Point being though that a certain reasonable degree of nebulous concern can be, if not exactly healthy or productive, then at least largely harmless.  Other bits of fluff, like your kitten story, can at times serve as a bit of a balm to an otherwise crummy day and lift one's spirits a bit to help one get through whatever morass of shiat remains of the day.

I agree that needless concern over that which is so far removed from any form of relevance in your life is pointless and a waste of time, but I suppose my point is that not every bit of fluff lacks for purpose to some people.
 
2018-02-08 03:00:07 PM  

i.r.id10t: Which is why I get my news - or at least links to news articles - from Fark and Slashdot.  If something really cool/interesting is happening, I check the CSM site.


Slashdot?   Should I look into it ?  I like news,  but random news , not all political news.  I am happy to hear about a bear stuck in a tree or how pizza is better than cereal for breakfast.
 
2018-02-08 03:02:00 PM  

Nidiot: It grinds us down until we adopt a worldview that is pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic. The scientific term is "learned helplessness". It's a bit of a stretch, but I would not be surprised if news consumption, at least partially contributes to the widespread disease of depression.

It wouldn't surprise me either. At the very least, it does nothing to help.

I was diagnosed with depression at seventeen years of age, and have been battling it for over thirty years. I tend to watch out for things that make my mood worse, and news does just that. It's mostly horrible stuff that's completely out of my control. Maybe some people can just turn-off their ability to have it affect them emotionally, I find I do better if I avoid much of the negative input in the first place.

Mind you, I don't avoid the news entirely, thus I'm still pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic.


Do you watch sports (or have a sports team ? ).  That may lead to sad days
 
2018-02-08 04:44:58 PM  
Then, at the bottom:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-08 05:43:05 PM  

zpaul: Nidiot: It grinds us down until we adopt a worldview that is pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic. The scientific term is "learned helplessness". It's a bit of a stretch, but I would not be surprised if news consumption, at least partially contributes to the widespread disease of depression.

It wouldn't surprise me either. At the very least, it does nothing to help.

I was diagnosed with depression at seventeen years of age, and have been battling it for over thirty years. I tend to watch out for things that make my mood worse, and news does just that. It's mostly horrible stuff that's completely out of my control. Maybe some people can just turn-off their ability to have it affect them emotionally, I find I do better if I avoid much of the negative input in the first place.

Mind you, I don't avoid the news entirely, thus I'm still pessimistic, desensitised, sarcastic and fatalistic.

Do you watch sports (or have a sports team ? ).  That may lead to sad days


No. I can never fathom how people get so involved with sports on tv, I simply cannot muster the energy to care deeply about people I don't know doing something that doesn't matter. Anyway, I work out the math, x number of teams, and only one will win the grand final game of whatever it is, so the odds are that I'm going to feel more losses than wins. I think I'll stick with not giving a damn.
 
2018-02-08 07:56:30 PM  
That's like breaking up with a terrible person then swearing off the whole gender.
News is neutral by nature. What news has become in the last 4 decades is probably bad for you.
 
2018-02-09 12:05:21 AM  

morg: News is neutral by nature. What news has become in the last 4 decades is probably bad for you.


No, not news is not neutral. Like everything news is relative, but more specifically the news like history is written by the winner. Any proper news organization should have a filter for what they consider good and proper and they should not be shy about stating their beliefs and using them as a basis to analyze the news. News also needs to have a memory and needs to be able to call out a liar. The current situation where news organizations trumpet out the latest crazy statements of senile old white men then interview two opposing but crazy talking-heads implicitly but convincingly implying that the truth lies in the middle creates a vast echo-chamber of no knowledge or value. The increasing noise and violence of modern news without any damping or consideration of larger issues is a huge part of our government's dysfunction and ultimately our society's destruction. Fox news is bad, but there are likely people at Fox who truly believe what they are saying. CNN is worse, everybody at CNN knows they are not speaking the whole truth, that they are covering the news for ratings and profit. Ultimately, the believers will beat out someone who is just doing a job. If we cannot get rid of the news as it is today then our society is doomed.
 
2018-02-09 05:27:11 AM  
That means The Daily Mail and The Sun are still ok, right?
 
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