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(SFGate)   Part-time Bay Area college professors are living in their cars while working at other jobs. Mostly just to show philosophy majors what their future holds   ( sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Bay Area, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Professor, Berkeley City College, California Community Colleges System, Oakland, California, Laney College, Peralta Community College District  
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823 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Feb 2018 at 2:24 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-02-07 10:23:37 PM  
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Actual white trash.
 
2018-02-07 11:07:23 PM  
F*CK this website! My processor almost exploded dealing with the ads, and I have an adblocker.
 
2018-02-07 11:17:40 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: F*CK this website! My processor almost exploded dealing with the ads, and I have an adblocker.


No ads appeared..... get a better ad blocker.
 
2018-02-08 12:30:59 AM  
Friend of mine is a history prof. A few years back when he was in in South Florida, he was getting $3,500 per class and teaching two to three classes per semester. So, $13K-$20K a year.

He tried to unionize the adjuncts.  Ended up having to move out of state to keep working.
 
2018-02-08 12:55:04 AM  
AirBnB.
 
2018-02-08 01:11:44 AM  
Meh. No one is forcing them. It is their choice to live in one of the most expensive cities in the country and grind their way to tenure.
 
2018-02-08 01:41:57 AM  
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2018-02-08 01:59:53 AM  

Ow! That was my feelings!: Meh. No one is forcing them. It is their choice to live in one of the most expensive cities in the country and grind their way to tenure.


Virtually no one goes from adjunct to tenure.  They are essentially two different tiers, and it is a rare university that will hire a person for full employment once they get the adjunct stank on them.
 
2018-02-08 02:28:52 AM  
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2018-02-08 03:01:30 AM  
That's basically why I wound up quitting my adjunct position. The pay is terrible, there's zero benefits or health coverage, and basically zero support from a school bureaucracy that sees adjuncts as disposable and interchangeable. Then there's the fact that colleges are getting rid of assistant and tenure-track positions in order to farm out all but the highest-tier of classes to adjuncts. I'm making more as a janitor than I did as a professor.
 
2018-02-08 09:02:57 AM  
I thought the ivory tower and education to of the noblest pursuits.  Which is why I cut the fark out after graduating to get my 6:30 to 6:30.

/benefits such as death and dismemberment
//PTO 5 weeks
///The pay my grad school
 
2018-02-08 09:56:10 AM  
Supply and demand. The US produces too many Ph.Ds, and has done so for decades.   Unless your Ph.D is from an Ivy, or one of the other top 20-30 schools, you are wasting your time.

This is from a ;libertarian site, but the article pretty much tells it like it is.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2006/01/g​a​ry-north/the-phd-glut/
 
2018-02-08 10:16:52 AM  

fusillade762: [img.fark.net image 480x640]


"y2k casulty".  Well, I suppose as long as he spells it consistently, the compiler's happy.
 
2018-02-08 11:38:02 AM  

phalamir: Ow! That was my feelings!: Meh. No one is forcing them. It is their choice to live in one of the most expensive cities in the country and grind their way to tenure.

Virtually no one goes from adjunct to tenure.  They are essentially two different tiers, and it is a rare university that will hire a person for full employment once they get the adjunct stank on them.


My wife is an adjunct and she's about to start a DBA program so she can be promoted to a tenure-track professor of marketing at the university she's teaching at now. But that's only because she convinced them they needed to build a more robust marketing program and created strong relationships with the program directors - it took a lot of work to get to the point where she is.

So, yeah, you're right, it's rare for someone to go from adjunct to tenure without extenuating circumstances.
 
2018-02-08 12:03:22 PM  

Fissile: Supply and demand. The US produces too many Ph.Ds, and has done so for decades.   Unless your Ph.D is from an Ivy, or one of the other top 20-30 schools, you are wasting your time.

This is from a ;libertarian site, but the article pretty much tells it like it is.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2006/01/ga​ry-north/the-phd-glut/


I don't think that even remotely tells the full story of what's going on.
 
2018-02-08 01:49:41 PM  

Fissile: Supply and demand. The US produces too many Ph.Ds, and has done so for decades.   Unless your Ph.D is from an Ivy, or one of the other top 20-30 schools, you are wasting your time.

This is from a ;libertarian site, but the article pretty much tells it like it is.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2006/01/ga​ry-north/the-phd-glut/


State legislators cutting higher-ed funding isn't helpng either. In my field, when tenured profs retire, then tend to kill the line and take adjuncts. There are still opportunities at state colleges and smaller lib arts schools for non-Ivy PhDs (I am one and got lucky. Despite the numerous applications I made, and the several finalist candidate campus-visit invitations, I hold the job at the only school to offer me the job (a Cal State school), and am now tenured.

I laugh at a nearby UC school that advertises for the same position every 2-3 years because they keep hiring Ivy leaguers with no teaching experience who use the position as a stepping-stone job. if they'd only "settle" for an equally-good (and often better because hungrier) scholar/teacher from another school, they wouldn't have to waste all that time and money searching for yet another person who will shortly leave. Because I doubt there are many applicants who, upon discovering some of the UCal profs are not Ivy, will then declare, "No way, man...I'm not going there! Fark that crappy school!"

/idiots
 
2018-02-08 02:20:27 PM  
Adjunct professorships are not meant to support full time academics. They are meant for people with other full time careers that want to share their expertise with students. It is poor practice for universities to do this, and bad decision-making by the adjuncts that try to squeak full time employment from adjunct positions (especially for more than a year or two). I understand that its hard to get academic jobs (and I worked hard for the one I have), but if you can't get a real job at a university, the adjunct route is not the road that you should be taking.
 
2018-02-08 02:21:53 PM  

seelorq: Fissile: Supply and demand. The US produces too many Ph.Ds, and has done so for decades.   Unless your Ph.D is from an Ivy, or one of the other top 20-30 schools, you are wasting your time.

This is from a ;libertarian site, but the article pretty much tells it like it is.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2006/01/ga​ry-north/the-phd-glut/

State legislators cutting higher-ed funding isn't helpng either. In my field, when tenured profs retire, then tend to kill the line and take adjuncts. There are still opportunities at state colleges and smaller lib arts schools for non-Ivy PhDs (I am one and got lucky. Despite the numerous applications I made, and the several finalist candidate campus-visit invitations, I hold the job at the only school to offer me the job (a Cal State school), and am now tenured.

I laugh at a nearby UC school that advertises for the same position every 2-3 years because they keep hiring Ivy leaguers with no teaching experience who use the position as a stepping-stone job. if they'd only "settle" for an equally-good (and often better because hungrier) scholar/teacher from another school, they wouldn't have to waste all that time and money searching for yet another person who will shortly leave. Because I doubt there are many applicants who, upon discovering some of the UCal profs are not Ivy, will then declare, "No way, man...I'm not going there! Fark that crappy school!"

/idiots


why is tenure the end goal? Is the pay better? Even if you're tenured, teaching and doing research is still your job right?
 
2018-02-08 03:21:11 PM  
chasd00:
why is tenure the end goal? Is the pay better? Even if you're tenured, teaching and doing research is still your job right?

Tenure is job security. The university can't cut your job just because they feel like it. Sad that job security is a hard worked for reward.
 
2018-02-08 04:08:59 PM  

Fissile: Supply and demand. The US produces too many Ph.Ds, and has done so for decades.   Unless your Ph.D is from an Ivy, or one of the other top 20-30 schools, you are wasting your time.

This is from a ;libertarian site, but the article pretty much tells it like it is.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/2006/01/ga​ry-north/the-phd-glut/


20 or 30? I think you mean 2 or 3?
 
2018-02-08 04:46:10 PM  
why is tenure the end goal? Is the pay better? Even if you're tenured, teaching and doing research is still your job right?

At most Carnegie D1 research institutions, tenured and tenure-track professors do almost zero teaching. They are not hired for their teaching abilities. They are hired for their ability write grants and bring in research dollars to the university. Graduate students at these schools will work with some excellent researchers, and these universities are excellent places for postdoctoral training. If you're an undergraduate at one of these schools, I hope you're self-motivated and can largely teach yourself, because you're unlikely to get much actual face time with your professor (if it's actually a professor that's teaching your course -- most likely, you'll be taught by a graduate student or an adjunct).
 
2018-02-08 04:48:57 PM  

ralphjr: [img.fark.net image 425x290]


Came to say you'll have plenty of time to get tenure when you're living in a van down by the river
 
2018-02-08 08:56:14 PM  
chasd00:
why is tenure the end goal? Is the pay better? Even if you're tenured, teaching and doing research is still your job right?

Yes, as mentioned above, job security is a big part of it...it also protects free speech in the classroom, so you can't be fired for getting into touchy subjects (but insulting students could get you fired...or, for young untenured profs, that could mean you don't get tenure, which effectively means you're fired). It's no guarantee of work, however, as you can still be fired for cause. At my school, teaching is our #1 priority, then research, then service (e.g., committee work, such as conducting the search for new faculty, which HR does not do). Tenure usually comes with promotion, so yes, the pay is better. When I was tenured (from ass't to assoc. professor), the promotion came with a 7% raise. I'll have one more promotion opportunity next Fall, when I go for "full" prof. Thereafter, if I want another significant raise, I'll have to change schools (unlikely) or go into administration (ew). Systems like U. Cal (including UCLA) offer merit raises if you do something like publish a book to good reviews. My school doesn't...so without incentive, tenured profs at teaching schools like mine tend to cut back on research a bit. The smaller standard-of-living raises, etc, are the purview of our union negotiators. And I am happy to pay the dues for that...they represent us well.
 
2018-02-08 10:48:16 PM  

seelorq: I laugh at a nearby UC school that advertises for the same position every 2-3 years because they keep hiring Ivy leaguers with no teaching experience who use the position as a stepping-stone job. if they'd only "settle" for an equally-good (and often better because hungrier) scholar/teacher from another school, they wouldn't have to waste all that time and money searching for yet another person who will shortly leave. Because I doubt there are many applicants who, upon discovering some of the UCal profs are not Ivy, will then declare, "No way, man...I'm not going there! Fark that crappy school!"


Hiring Ivy leaguers is an ego fark for the people doing the hiring.

Oh, when I was an undergrad at Rutgers in the early/mid 80s almost all tenured faculty were out of the Ivies...and most of them were miserable and angry.   It took me a long time to figure out, but eventually I realized that ending up at place like Rutgers was career failure for them, even if the pay was very good...and it was.   They all imagined themselves being retained in the Ivies, or a few of the better private schools.   They made no attempt to hide their contempt for RU undergrads, they hated us even more than the average tenured prof hates undergrads.
 
2018-02-08 11:12:37 PM  

Fissile: seelorq: I laugh at a nearby UC school that advertises for the same position every 2-3 years because they keep hiring Ivy leaguers with no teaching experience who use the position as a stepping-stone job. if they'd only "settle" for an equally-good (and often better because hungrier) scholar/teacher from another school, they wouldn't have to waste all that time and money searching for yet another person who will shortly leave. Because I doubt there are many applicants who, upon discovering some of the UCal profs are not Ivy, will then declare, "No way, man...I'm not going there! Fark that crappy school!"

Hiring Ivy leaguers is an ego fark for the people doing the hiring.

Oh, when I was an undergrad at Rutgers in the early/mid 80s almost all tenured faculty were out of the Ivies...and most of them were miserable and angry.   It took me a long time to figure out, but eventually I realized that ending up at place like Rutgers was career failure for them, even if the pay was very good...and it was.   They all imagined themselves being retained in the Ivies, or a few of the better private schools.   They made no attempt to hide their contempt for RU undergrads, they hated us even more than the average tenured prof hates undergrads.


I've seen that, too. But I wouldn't say that the average tenured prof hates undergrads...especially at schools, like mine, where teaching (not research) is the major component of the job. I've come to appreciate the fact that my teaching has a much larger impact on my thousands of students (over 10 years) than on the relatively small number of academics who've likely read my specialized peer-reviewed research. Because it feels pretty damned good when students--as one did last week--drop by my office just to say, "Hi prof. seelorq, I just wanted to say I really enjoy your lectures. See you next week!"

/Let's just say I have a face for radio, so don't even go there.
 
2018-02-09 09:44:00 AM  

seelorq: chasd00:
why is tenure the end goal? Is the pay better? Even if you're tenured, teaching and doing research is still your job right?

Yes, as mentioned above, job security is a big part of it...it also protects free speech in the classroom, so you can't be fired for getting into touchy subjects (but insulting students could get you fired...or, for young untenured profs, that could mean you don't get tenure, which effectively means you're fired). It's no guarantee of work, however, as you can still be fired for cause. At my school, teaching is our #1 priority, then research, then service (e.g., committee work, such as conducting the search for new faculty, which HR does not do). Tenure usually comes with promotion, so yes, the pay is better. When I was tenured (from ass't to assoc. professor), the promotion came with a 7% raise. I'll have one more promotion opportunity next Fall, when I go for "full" prof. Thereafter, if I want another significant raise, I'll have to change schools (unlikely) or go into administration (ew). Systems like U. Cal (including UCLA) offer merit raises if you do something like publish a book to good reviews. My school doesn't...so without incentive, tenured profs at teaching schools like mine tend to cut back on research a bit. The smaller standard-of-living raises, etc, are the purview of our union negotiators. And I am happy to pay the dues for that...they represent us well.


seems like there should be more for as much as a PITA getting tenure seems to be. A friend of mine's dad was high up in the chain at A&M (i think he was the dean of the business school) he wrote a couple textbooks and then they became the standard books for the college. He's pretty much set and his kid's kids are set, that's what I would do if I were a professor. Coincidentally, he bought a ranch outside College Station and then then discovered some recoverable oil on it. heh the more the merrier i guess.
 
2018-02-09 01:44:30 PM  
chasd00:
seems like there should be more for as much as a PITA getting tenure seems to be. A friend of mine's dad was high up in the chain at A&M (i think he was the dean of the business school) he wrote a couple textbooks and then they became the standard books for the college. He's pretty much set and his kid's kids are set, that's what I would do if I were a professor. Coincidentally, he bought a ranch outside College Station and then then discovered some recoverable oil on it. heh the more the merrier i guess.

Agreed...just getting the credential (a PhD) to apply for a faculty position is a long expensive process...then the research hustle to publish multiple peer-reviewed articles for tenure... But good for your friend's dad. I couldn't do it. Administration is very much a 9-5 + lots of overtime for arse-kissing events kind of job that deals too much with the entitled faculty members who get insulted if they are asked to show up on campus four days a week, and the parents who get outraged when their precious can-do-no-wrong son, who skipped half the semester, fails a class or three. Not to mention the herding-cats nonsense when directed to get this-or-that department to comply with the latest unfunded mandate which, of course, is nowhere to be found in the faculty contract.

I say, fark that. That's not what I was trained to do. I love teaching. I meet my campus obligations and respect my students, but don't have to clock in and out every day. I often grade and prep classes and do related research at home on the couch with my dogs. Nobody is looking over my shoulder, or demanding my attention for some HR nightmare or fundraising event on Saturday.
 
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