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(Mirror.co.uk)   Millions of Brits can't identify everyday fruits and vegetables without boiling them first   ( mirror.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sad, Fruit, cent, fruits, edition baobab yogurt, exotic new fruits, fictional fruit 'hogloa, fake fruit leemi, unaware fad-food avocado  
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1878 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Feb 2018 at 2:05 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-02-07 01:46:38 PM  
Yeah this is old news. It's Grassley and Graham and so far the justices department has just shrugged. The interview took place overseas not on US soil so it would be questionable if they could even prosecute him.
 
2018-02-07 02:08:26 PM  
At the Wegmans' checkout a little while ago, the cashier was looking at me for help identifying a farking CUCUMBER.  Sad.
 
2018-02-07 02:10:56 PM  
So lots of people who were willing to spend twenty minutes answering stupid questions on the street in the middle of a working day don't eat that much fruit?

Colour me shocked
 
2018-02-07 02:11:42 PM  

not enough beer: Yeah this is old news. It's Grassley and Graham and so far the justices department has just shrugged. The interview took place overseas not on US soil so it would be questionable if they could even prosecute him.


I guess this is kind of a Devin Nunes thread?
 
2018-02-07 02:14:35 PM  

not enough beer: Yeah this is old news. It's Grassley and Graham and so far the justices department has just shrugged. The interview took place overseas not on US soil so it would be questionable if they could even prosecute him.


Username checks out.
 
2018-02-07 02:16:00 PM  
Regarding TFA, it's just an ad for Yeo Valley yogurts, as most articles about polls commissioned by companies tend to be.

But:

A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.


shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.
 
2018-02-07 02:39:29 PM  

iron de havilland: A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.

shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.


Came here to say this
 
2018-02-07 02:43:12 PM  
Britain: The World's Appalachia
 
2018-02-07 02:50:57 PM  
I'd hardly call jackfruit an everyday fruit.
And they did the old culinary definition vs. botanical definition switcheroo for peppers, squash, etc.
 
2018-02-07 02:52:03 PM  
Yes, cucumbers are a fruit (classed as a berry, just like watermelon), but no-one thinks of them or bell peppers as fruit.

"Hi, yes, I'd like a mixed-fruit smoothie, please"
"What flavors?"
"Bell pepper and cucumber, please"
"fark off you silly git!"
 
2018-02-07 02:58:59 PM  

Contrabulous Flabtraption: Britain: The World's Appalachia


Basing your idea of a culture on the worst of its tabloid press is not a wise thing to do.

Assuming you're American, should I pre-judge you based on Fox News?
 
2018-02-07 03:16:41 PM  
Asking people in a non-tropical country that has to import most of it's fruit, about somewhat obscure tropical fruits.. That's not bias (sarcastically)..I've never eaten a baobao or a jackfruit or even seen them before. Mangoes  are one of the most widely eaten fruits in the world, you can get them in a jar or fresh
about anywhere. I'm a little surprised so many people had issues with that one.

England is the land of meat ,potatoes, and milk foods.. And it's never been a culinary paradise of variety or experimentation.
 
2018-02-07 03:18:05 PM  

Mr. Shabooboo: Asking people in a non-tropical country that has to import most of it's fruit, about somewhat obscure tropical fruits.. That's not bias (sarcastically)..I've never eaten a baobao or a jackfruit or even seen them before. Mangoes  are one of the most widely eaten fruits in the world, you can get them in a jar or fresh
about anywhere. I'm a little surprised so many people had issues with that one.

England is the land of meat ,potatoes, and milk foods.. And it's never been a culinary paradise of variety or experimentation.


Scotland, on the other hand......
 
2018-02-07 03:22:56 PM  

give me doughnuts: Yes, cucumbers are a fruit (classed as a berry, just like watermelon), but no-one thinks of them or bell peppers as fruit.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 03:23:34 PM  
So Little Britain was a documentary?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 03:25:36 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 03:36:48 PM  
If you have never seen a mulberry tree before I can see how you would think it grew on a bush. There's a nursery rhyme about a mulberry bush.

/this does not excuse being unable to identify monkeys and weasels.
 
2018-02-07 03:49:13 PM  

iron de havilland: Regarding TFA, it's just an ad for Yeo Valley yogurts, as most articles about polls commissioned by companies tend to be.

But:

A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.

shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.


Clementines tend to be darling, though.
 
2018-02-07 04:15:47 PM  

Snarfangel: iron de havilland: Regarding TFA, it's just an ad for Yeo Valley yogurts, as most articles about polls commissioned by companies tend to be.

But:

A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.

shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.

Clementines tend to be darling, though.


And if one rolls behind the fridge, it's lost and gone forever..
 
2018-02-07 04:16:42 PM  
I wouldn't call a mango an "everyday" fruit. And who the hell could tell a tangerine from a clementine?
 
2018-02-07 04:17:03 PM  

Snarfangel: iron de havilland: Regarding TFA, it's just an ad for Yeo Valley yogurts, as most articles about polls commissioned by companies tend to be.

But:

A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.

shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.

Clementines tend to be darling, though.


Also known for having slightly above-average size feet
 
2018-02-07 04:26:32 PM  
"Millions of Brits."

"A poll of 2000 UK adults."

Last time I checked 2000 was considerably less than millions. Apparently it's hard to math. Shouldn't really be surprised at red top hyperbole however.
 
2018-02-07 04:31:48 PM  

Averam: Apparently it's hard to maths.


FTFY 😜
 
2018-02-07 04:33:39 PM  
FAILED FRUITS
(with the percentage who weren't able to identify them)
Feijoa - 85 per cent
Baobab - 74
Tangerine - 71
Durian - 64
Mulberry - 50
Jackfruit - 49
Mango - 42
Grapefruit - 40
Fig - 34
Pomegranate - 9


With the exception of tangerine (which would probably give me problems if set next to a clementine),   I couldn't id any of them until you hit mango.  Before mulberry (again with the tangerine exemption), I'd just think you were making shiat up to try to catch me out.

It was then unsurprising when it emerged that the average Brit spends a mere £11.04 on fruit and veg each week

$15/week on fruits & vegies in the middle of winter?  Yeah, my consumption of them goes down when it's really expensive too.  In the summer/fall when they're ripe consumption goes up...imagine that (but even then it's not $15/week - of course I/we do grow a lot of that so...)
 
2018-02-07 04:35:36 PM  

iron de havilland: Averam: Apparently it's hard to maths.

FTFY 😜


Yeah it's weird for me that one. Despite being British and only ever having lived in Britain, I've always said math and not maths even though the pluralised version is the normal UK version. No idea why I've always done that.
 
2018-02-07 04:54:32 PM  

Averam: iron de havilland: Averam: Apparently it's hard to maths.

FTFY

Yeah it's weird for me that one. Despite being British and only ever having lived in Britain, I've always said math and not maths even though the pluralised version is the normal UK version. No idea why I've always done that.


Contrariwise, I found it pretty jarring the first time I heard the single word "math" in some crappy 80s film.

It really does take all sorts.

/lol
 
2018-02-07 05:00:33 PM  
Snort - I just asked Mrs RT if the words Feijoa, Baobab, & Durian meant anything to her.  Her instant reply, dwarves in The Hobbit?
 
2018-02-07 05:09:56 PM  
FTFA: "And even more alarmingly, seven per cent ticked 'Halle Berry' when asked to identify a mulberry."

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 05:21:16 PM  

Ambivalence: I wouldn't call a mango an "everyday" fruit. And who the hell could tell a tangerine from a clementine?


Mango was an everyday fruit in Africa, but yeah, most of these are hardly common fruits or veggies in the US.

And nobody but botanists or trivia nerds care about the botanical definition of fruit. We all eat food, we care about the culinary definitions of fruits and vegetables.
 
2018-02-07 05:40:03 PM  
I suspect the durian score would've been higher if they were asked to identify the fruits by smell.
 
2018-02-07 05:47:24 PM  
So when you open the article, what it looks like is that Britons have trouble identifying uncommon fruits (Such as mistaking a mango for an apple) and cannot tell an orange from a tangerine (round orange citrus fruits may look similar, imagine that.)

They also cannot identify what kind of plant a lot of these fruits grow on. Nevermind that a lot of these fruits are not commonly encountered. They also found that many Britons may not know the esoterica of the fact that a tomato and a watermelon are berries, while a strawberry is in fact not a berry at all.

It really just kind of feels like the kind of article that finds the obvious then words it in a moral panic sort of way. "Oh em geee britons r dum!"
 
2018-02-07 05:56:09 PM  

Averam: "Millions of Brits."

"A poll of 2000 UK adults."

Last time I checked 2000 was considerably less than millions. Apparently it's hard to math. Shouldn't really be surprised at red top hyperbole however.


We're also going to video people on the street and edit out the people who aren't morons.
 
2018-02-07 06:03:01 PM  

empres77: FTFA: "And even more alarmingly, seven per cent ticked 'Halle Berry' when asked to identify a mulberry."

img.fark.netView Full Size


pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 06:23:10 PM  

iron de havilland: Contrabulous Flabtraption: Britain: The World's Appalachia

Basing your idea of a culture on the worst of its tabloid press is not a wise thing to do.

Assuming you're American, should I pre-judge you based on Fox News?


Oh boo hoo. Go eat what you think it a banana.
 
2018-02-07 06:59:54 PM  
I've never even heard of three of the top four misses and I'm 65!
 
2018-02-07 07:26:43 PM  
I would have called the tangerine and clementine manderins
which is technically correct
 
2018-02-07 07:37:07 PM  
I was all set to feel smug until...

It emerged that one in four knew a baobab on sight, with many mistaking it for a melon or the made-up 'barfu' fruit.
One in five confused a feijoa for the fake fruit leemi.


A what now?

Google says a baobab is native to Madagascar and other areas of Africa. Feijoa is native to Brazil. Can Brits identify fruits and veggies native to North America like:
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 08:46:14 PM  

ihateallofyou: If you have never seen a mulberry tree before I can see how you would think it grew on a bush. There's a nursery rhyme about a mulberry bush.

/this does not excuse being unable to identify monkeys and weasels.


Can you tell the difference between weasels, ferrets, and stoats?
 
2018-02-07 09:18:33 PM  

Contrabulous Flabtraption: iron de havilland: Contrabulous Flabtraption: Britain: The World's Appalachia

Basing your idea of a culture on the worst of its tabloid press is not a wise thing to do.

Assuming you're American, should I pre-judge you based on Fox News?

Oh boo hoo. Go eat what you think it a banana.


So, you're more kind of Info Wars level?
 
2018-02-08 12:31:46 AM  

iron de havilland: Contrabulous Flabtraption: Britain: The World's Appalachia

Basing your idea of a culture on the worst of its tabloid press is not a wise thing to do.

Assuming you're American, should I pre-judge you based on Fox News?


Absolutely.

Wereno more
 
2018-02-08 12:32:39 AM  

Bonzo_1116: iron de havilland: Contrabulous Flabtraption: Britain: The World's Appalachia

Basing your idea of a culture on the worst of its tabloid press is not a wise thing to do.

Assuming you're American, should I pre-judge you based on Fox News?

Absolutely.

Wereno more


Lol

We're no better than a pack of wild dogs.


/Goddamn mobile keyboard
 
2018-02-08 02:42:20 AM  
Well, they call it "apple mango" in Japan for a reason.
 
2018-02-08 08:54:11 AM  

Mr. Shabooboo: Asking people in a non-tropical country that has to import most of it's fruit, about somewhat obscure tropical fruits.. That's not bias (sarcastically)..I've never eaten a baobao or a jackfruit or even seen them before. Mangoes  are one of the most widely eaten fruits in the world, you can get them in a jar or fresh
about anywhere. I'm a little surprised so many people had issues with that one.

England is the land of meat ,potatoes, and milk foods.. And it's never been a culinary paradise of variety or experimentation.


Plus they interviewed people in the city who have very little chance of seeing these fruits before they are processed.
 
2018-02-08 09:09:20 AM  

Snarfangel: iron de havilland: Regarding TFA, it's just an ad for Yeo Valley yogurts, as most articles about polls commissioned by companies tend to be.

But:

A poll of 2,000 UK adults also found more than 70 per cent could not tell a tangerine from an orange or clementine.

shiat, tangerines, clementines, satsumas... they're all pretty f*cking similar. Small orange citrus fruits. And they are just ickle oranges, anyway.

Clementines tend to be darling, though.


But then they get lost and gone forever.
 
2018-02-08 09:10:22 AM  

Ambivalence: I wouldn't call a mango an "everyday" fruit. And who the hell could tell a tangerine from a clementine?


Somebody that picks the fruit.
 
2018-02-08 09:37:57 AM  

Averam: iron de havilland: Averam: Apparently it's hard to maths.

FTFY 😜

Yeah it's weird for me that one. Despite being British and only ever having lived in Britain, I've always said math and not maths even though the pluralised version is the normal UK version. No idea why I've always done that.


Because you're normal?
 
2018-02-08 10:24:23 AM  

Mr. Shabooboo: Asking people in a non-tropical country that has to import most of it's fruit, about somewhat obscure tropical fruits.. That's not bias (sarcastically)..I've never eaten a baobao or a jackfruit or even seen them before. Mangoes  are one of the most widely eaten fruits in the world, you can get them in a jar or fresh
about anywhere. I'm a little surprised so many people had issues with that one.

England is the land of meat ,potatoes, and milk foods.. And it's never been a culinary paradise of variety or experimentation.


We only eat Mango in curries typically and by that time no one can identify them.
 
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