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(Fox 40 Sacramento)   Woman searching for author of box of WWII love letters she found, complete with lots of dust   ( fox40.com) divider line
    More: Sappy, Academy Award for Best Actress, English-language films, Hannan, letters, Love, Miss Iris, Iris Wood, Hollie Hannan  
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2677 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Feb 2018 at 6:50 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-02-07 01:33:20 PM  
/CSB on

I was raised by my grandparents and thought my grandfather a stick in mud through my teenage years of course.

Then in my early 30s, after he had passed away, my grandmother let me read some of the letters they sent back and forth during the war.

Got to read about how his CO looked the other way as he beat the crap out of a guy for stealing a lighter my grandmother had given him after he and some buddies did some investigating to figure out who took it and presented their evidence to the CO.

Also how he enjoyed boxing but after breaking his nose 3 times (well, getting it broken) decided it wasn't for him and he'd stick to baseball.

That and other things I got to read gave me a peek into a whole different side of him.

/CSB off
 
2018-02-07 06:53:30 PM  
Ya know, in the future...this kind of thing isn't going to be so romantic and sweet.

Hey, DTF?
LOL, yeah!
K, brt
 
2018-02-07 06:56:34 PM  

mrsleep: Ya know, in the future...this kind of thing isn't going to be so romantic and sweet.

Hey, DTF?
LOL, yeah!
K, brt


But enuff bout yo mom heh.
 
2018-02-07 07:02:14 PM  
Spoiler: both the author and the intended recipient were banging others on the side.
 
2018-02-07 07:17:22 PM  
Subby.. 1946, between August and October is when those letters were written.
That's not WWII. That's a whole year after DUBYA DUBYA TWO.

Where'd ya learn yer history?
At the "chronological accuracy  in history is unimportant" store????
 
2018-02-07 07:20:49 PM  

FuLinHyu: /CSB on

I was raised by my grandparents and thought my grandfather a stick in mud through my teenage years of course.

Then in my early 30s, after he had passed away, my grandmother let me read some of the letters they sent back and forth during the war.

Got to read about how his CO looked the other way as he beat the crap out of a guy for stealing a lighter my grandmother had given him after he and some buddies did some investigating to figure out who took it and presented their evidence to the CO.

Also how he enjoyed boxing but after breaking his nose 3 times (well, getting it broken) decided it wasn't for him and he'd stick to baseball.

That and other things I got to read gave me a peek into a whole different side of him.

/CSB off


Always interesting to read those.  I read my granddad's war diary; he was a radio operator and gunner on a bomber in the Pacific.  He wrote a lot about girls back home and playing cards, but most of all he talked about his points status in terms of getting home.
 
2018-02-07 07:29:39 PM  

gameshowhost: Spoiler: both the author and the intended recipient were banging others on the side.


Don't worry.  Everyone involved is almost certainly dead.
 
2018-02-07 07:30:39 PM  
CSB:
A co-worker and I found a similar collection of love notes & wedding albums discarded in a vacant lot. Maybe a house burglar dumped what they couldn't pawn? We managed to deliver it to the owner who lived nearby, only to find out that she threw them out on purpose.
/CSB
 
2018-02-07 07:47:12 PM  
Am I the only one wondering if the guy wrote back?  It looks like a bunch of sappy letters from a girl to a guy, but it's possible the guy didn't tell fee same about her.
/  I read a letter from my grandfather during WWII.  He was a cook before he was drafted and the army made him a cook.  In his letter he told my grandmother that must have been a mistake since he was the only army cook who knew how to cook.
 
2018-02-07 07:47:43 PM  
I was buying storage  units back in the day before that show ruined it.  Found a whole collection of post war pictures, letters, and other stuff all relating to one family.   Lots of pictures of one guy in uniform next to a jeep.  Anyway, obviously a WWII veteran.

One of the things was a condolence letter written just as Viet Nam was warming up.  It was from one woman to her friend, a former neighbor when they were stationed at Ft. Hood.  The recipient's husband had died of a heart attack.  She then went on to describe how her husband had just been called up for Viet Nam, and why would they want someone that old, etc..  And how she would cry at night, and couldn't sleep, and had nightmares about it.  It really shook me.

I found the descendants of that family living locally and tried to return their stuff.   It was three generations of their family history.  They didn't give a shiat.  I still have the stuff.
 
2018-02-07 08:01:51 PM  
She wants to return the letters to Iris, or her family, and wants to make sure this love story has a happy ending.

A massage followed by a finger bang?

'Cuz I don't think a happy ending is saying to a ~90 year old woman, "remember the love of your life who died before you even started your life together, and the resulting heartbreak and grief, which at least have faded over ~70 years? Yeah, here's a reminder to reopen old wounds just before you check out. No, not unsent love letters from him. No, not his diary, or a photo, or a keepsake item. Just your own letters, kicked back as 'return to sender'! You're welcome."

"Gosh it was dusty in there. I spilled his urn and ashes just got everywhere."
 
2018-02-07 08:16:30 PM  
Nice tits.
 
2018-02-07 11:29:32 PM  
I hope the family is interested to see them, if they are found. I always find it a bit sad when I see this sort of thing, or family photos, for sale at flea markets.

Several years ago, I found a copy of the UCMJ from the 1920s in an antique store in Montgomery, AL that had the owner's name written in several places on it (the USAF JAG school is at Maxwell AFB). It belonged to an Early E.W. Duncan, who went on to be the commander of the 240th Composite Wing (Iceland) during WWII, among other assignments. There is much more online nowadays about him than when I first acquired it. I've made no attempt to reunite it with his descendants.
 
2018-02-08 12:04:27 AM  
Whenever I see a story about WWII love letters, it reminds me of Elizabeth Moore and Chris Barker.  They were a British couple that conducted their romance through over 500 letters during the war. Their correspondence became part of a book, then a book itself, a radio drama, and numerous Letters Live performances.

'Dearest Chris' Louise Brealey reads Bessie Moore’s love letter
Youtube oDqgTfrvEYE
 
2018-02-08 12:30:44 AM  
I found a whole box full of love letters from my husband's great uncle to his sweetheart, Millie. He wrote her nearly every day of the war.

I had planned on typing them out, but I never got around to it.

Time to get around to it.
 
2018-02-08 01:32:43 AM  

Rent Party: I was buying storage  units back in the day before that show ruined it.  Found a whole collection of post war pictures, letters, and other stuff all relating to one family.   Lots of pictures of one guy in uniform next to a jeep.  Anyway, obviously a WWII veteran.

One of the things was a condolence letter written just as Viet Nam was warming up.  It was from one woman to her friend, a former neighbor when they were stationed at Ft. Hood.  The recipient's husband had died of a heart attack.  She then went on to describe how her husband had just been called up for Viet Nam, and why would they want someone that old, etc..  And how she would cry at night, and couldn't sleep, and had nightmares about it.  It really shook me.

I found the descendants of that family living locally and tried to return their stuff.   It was three generations of their family history.  They didn't give a shiat.  I still have the stuff.


Could you see if there is a town archive or some community group you could donate the collection to? I would think those heritage websites have to get their records from somewhere...
 
2018-02-08 10:27:38 AM  
Weird, I didn't think anyone loved that war.
 
2018-02-08 01:17:50 PM  

Nina9: Rent Party: I was buying storage  units back in the day before that show ruined it.  Found a whole collection of post war pictures, letters, and other stuff all relating to one family.   Lots of pictures of one guy in uniform next to a jeep.  Anyway, obviously a WWII veteran.

One of the things was a condolence letter written just as Viet Nam was warming up.  It was from one woman to her friend, a former neighbor when they were stationed at Ft. Hood.  The recipient's husband had died of a heart attack.  She then went on to describe how her husband had just been called up for Viet Nam, and why would they want someone that old, etc..  And how she would cry at night, and couldn't sleep, and had nightmares about it.  It really shook me.

I found the descendants of that family living locally and tried to return their stuff.   It was three generations of their family history.  They didn't give a shiat.  I still have the stuff.

Could you see if there is a town archive or some community group you could donate the collection to? I would think those heritage websites have to get their records from somewhere...


I could, and probably should just to get them out of the house.  But honestly, I'm really attached to these people (the dead ones, anyway) for some reason.     I love history and trying to piece together these folk's story became a bit of an obsession for a while.

When we bought the storage unit it was because it was full of Coca-cola memorabilia (including a full sized park bench) which generally sells pretty well.   The family originated in Ames, Iowa.  One of the middle kids had come out here and was working as a welder (I have his union card) and had a teenage daughter.   She got caught up with some gangster types (I have a lot of pictures of the sorta chubby white girl gang signing, too) and apparently he followed suit.  He went to prison for dealing drugs (I have his parole card and sentencing documents), which clarified all the Coca-cola memorabilia.  Dude turned into a coke dealer, and all the stuff was kind of a weird joke.  Wakka wakka.  So there is that.

Then there were some pictures taken probably in the '20s of these two sisters.  This one I fell madly in love with.  How could you not!   Look at that grin, you just know she's up to shenanigans.

img.fark.netView Full Size


Also in the collection was a photo of the beautiful woman, taken at some point in the '60s.  Take a look at that smile, and tell me that's not the same person.

img.fark.netView Full Size

She died some time back at the age of 92, and is buried in Aimes.  She was the one true love of my life, I think.   I'm also pretty sure she was either the author or the recipient of the aforementioned letter.

So anyway, l will try to find some place to home this stuff, but I want to wait until I figure out their story.  Since the current generation of this family doesn't give a shiat about it, I feel like someone should.   They deserve at least that.
 
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