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(Metro)   I said, "THIS IS WHAT TINNITUS SOUNDS LIKE"   ( metro.co.uk) divider line
    More: Scary, Hearing Loss, Sound, Ear, Hearing Loss Chief, Tinnitus, loud music, safe exposure, exposure time halves  
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2470 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Feb 2018 at 3:35 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-06 02:07:20 PM  
Tinnitus sucks. But it doesn't have anything to do with your ears:

In 2004 Louis Lowry, an ear-nose-and-throat doctor at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, discovered that the caudate and the putamen play an important role in tinnitus by studying an unusual patient-himself.
As a young man, Lowry spent a summer working on a farm with a noisy tractor. The experience left him with partial hearing loss and a high-pitched ringing in his ears that plagued him for 40 years. Then at age 63, Lowry suffered a mild stroke. A CT scan and an MRI revealed that the stroke had damaged his caudate and putamen. But the stroke also brought a pleasant surprise. Lowry was completely cured of his tinnitus, without any further hearing loss.


source

Deaf people can have tinnitus. Weird and fascinating.
 
2018-02-06 02:10:38 PM  
That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring
 
2018-02-06 02:19:40 PM  
Mine is a sharp, hissing air sound 24/7 for the last 5 years. Also, affected ear is 80% deaf as well.
I think that I had a very low level of it for a couple of decades but didn't notice it. Got severely sick with influenza in 2013 and then it came on full tilt.
No cure. You get used to it. Still a PIA.
 
2018-02-06 02:20:03 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 02:25:23 PM  

cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring


Same here, sometimes it gets real loud.
 
2018-02-06 02:27:37 PM  

cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring


Same here...some days are worse than others..but by now after a decade of it I have to focus on it to "hear" it, otherwise my brain does a good job at putting it into the background.
 
2018-02-06 02:53:19 PM  
High pitched SCREEEEEEEE ... ugh

Thankfully a little background noise radio/music/tv at a low volume filters out/makes it easy to ignore most of it.

Quiet nights though....
 
2018-02-06 04:26:10 PM  

Recoil Therapy: High pitched SCREEEEEEEE ... ugh

Thankfully a little background noise radio/music/tv at a low volume filters out/makes it easy to ignore most of it.

Quiet nights though....


Mine only bugs when there's absolute silence or I think about having tinnitus.

/former punk rock drummer
//amps, monitors, and PA systems all worked together
///things you wish you could go back and tell your younger self--like to wear earplugs
 
2018-02-06 04:27:50 PM  
That was a really weird "simulation" to me.  It's just high-pitched constant noise to me.  Sometimes it's louder, sometimes it's quieter, and sometimes I'm surprised that others can't hear it because it's unbearably loud.  My wife (teacher) brought home one of the school hearing testers to try on me.  She and the kids just sat and laughed because they had turned it up so loud that it was loud for them but I couldn't hear it.  Only about 5-10% of days can I even hear crickets...which is nice when you have that one that hangs out in the house making noise at night.  I don't get told to find it anymore.  For non-high pitches I can hear well.  Crowded areas are hard for conversation.  Maybe I'm just old.
 
2018-02-06 04:28:25 PM  
memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 04:34:32 PM  
Aphex Twin - Ventolin (Salbutamol Mix).
Youtube LbEsb0JqGQs
 
2018-02-06 04:39:23 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Tinnitus sucks. But it doesn't have anything to do with your ears:

In 2004 Louis Lowry, an ear-nose-and-throat doctor at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, discovered that the caudate and the putamen play an important role in tinnitus by studying an unusual patient-himself.
As a young man, Lowry spent a summer working on a farm with a noisy tractor. The experience left him with partial hearing loss and a high-pitched ringing in his ears that plagued him for 40 years. Then at age 63, Lowry suffered a mild stroke. A CT scan and an MRI revealed that the stroke had damaged his caudate and putamen. But the stroke also brought a pleasant surprise. Lowry was completely cured of his tinnitus, without any further hearing loss.

source

Deaf people can have tinnitus. Weird and fascinating.


and excessive caffeine intake can give you tinnitus too.
 
2018-02-06 04:42:30 PM  

Explodo: Crowded areas are hard for conversation. Maybe I'm just old.


Sounds like you have the same type of tinnitus as I have, and the same type of hearing loss. I have the same problem hearing voices in a crowd, but interestingly there are a small number of people whose voices come across loud and clear. I don't know if it's the pitch of their voice or what.
 
2018-02-06 04:43:44 PM  
i.telegraph.co.ukView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 04:50:44 PM  
Tinnitus sucks. It gets really loud for me at night (Obviously because I'm in a quiet room).  Now I have a portable a/c unit by my bed I run every night.  It's just white noise so I don't have to hear the ringing.
 
2018-02-06 04:51:23 PM  
One sounded like someone constantly knocking on the door - that would be doubly annoying
 
2018-02-06 04:54:43 PM  

CruiserTwelve: Explodo: Crowded areas are hard for conversation. Maybe I'm just old.

Sounds like you have the same type of tinnitus as I have, and the same type of hearing loss. I have the same problem hearing voices in a crowd, but interestingly there are a small number of people whose voices come across loud and clear. I don't know if it's the pitch of their voice or what.


Sounds a bit similar to me. I have had high pitch and low sounds hearing loss since birth. I can hear people in crowds but I can't understand what they're saying, it's weird. I also can't hear stuff like watch alarms and beeps, nor can I hear crickets. I can't listen to the example from TFA at work, but my tinnitus will just randomly show up as a sharp and painful high pitch squeal for about 5-10 seconds  and goes away and then my ear or ears hurt for a number of minutes afterwards.
 
2018-02-06 04:55:19 PM  

LordChinny: One sounded like someone constantly knocking on the door - that would be doubly annoying


Death - Keep on Knocking (1976)
Youtube uAZ9R2t5Jd0
 
2018-02-06 05:01:47 PM  

Bovine Diarrhea Virus: Tinnitus sucks. It gets really loud for me at night (Obviously because I'm in a quiet room).  Now I have a portable a/c unit by my bed I run every night.  It's just white noise so I don't have to hear the ringing.


I use my Echo to play brown noise or heavy rain sounds.
 
2018-02-06 05:07:21 PM  

cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring


You married my my ex !?
 
2018-02-06 05:09:29 PM  
I get that first sound sometimes right after I go to bed. It grows in intensity and then suddenly stops.
 
2018-02-06 05:11:17 PM  
My sounds like an old TV really far away with a bit of high pitch wine, or like machinery in a factory very far away.  I deal with it through out the day, and only hear it when i think about it.  Going to bed at night is a bit of a struggle because its so quiet, its all I hear.
 
2018-02-06 05:11:34 PM  

Odoriferous Queef: cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring

You married my my ex !?


Yes, I married your your ex
 
2018-02-06 05:21:11 PM  

darthaegis: cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring

Same here, sometimes it gets real loud.


Me too.  Second on it having nothing to do with the ear--I'm totally deaf in my right ear but nonetheless have loud tinnitus on that side.
 
2018-02-06 05:23:34 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: I also can't hear stuff like watch alarms and beeps


I was walking through the supermarket awhile ago and a lady walked up to me and asked "Is that your phone?" I pulled my phone out and sure it enough, it was ringing but I could barely hear it. I thanked the lady and told her I must have the ringer too low. She smiled and  told me she was two aisles over and could hear it just fine.

A few years back I was addressing a small group of people and something odd happened. I couldn't figure it out right away, but suddenly I could hear papers rustling and chairs squeaking. I realized my tinnitus had completely stopped and my hearing was the best it had been in years. It stayed that way for about a day, then the tinnitus came back over the next few days. I wish I could figure out what caused that temporary relief.
 
2018-02-06 05:33:40 PM  

Dumski: Mine is a sharp, hissing air sound 24/7 for the last 5 years. Also, affected ear is 80% deaf as well.
I think that I had a very low level of it for a couple of decades but didn't notice it. Got severely sick with influenza in 2013 and then it came on full tilt.
No cure. You get used to it. Still a PIA.


That's mine too, like a jet of air, or a vacuum leak.  sometimes it's worse than other times, but it's always there.  i try not to think about it, that only makes it worse.
thanks subby :(
 
2018-02-06 05:40:29 PM  
For me, its a couple times a day, a high pitched zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz in either of my ears, for no apparent reason, and when I lay down at night if my ear is to the pillow, I hear a ringing noise.

I have a collection of 60-70 concert stubs though, and it took me a long time to reluctantly wear plugs.  I still take them out if i really like the band though, because I don't get as into the show with them in. Its just necessary for my enjoyment I guess.  My hearing itself doesnt seem to be affected, but i'm 36.  Down the road I'll probably pay for the concert enjoyment... but thats life, you always seem to pay a price for anything enjoyable.
 
2018-02-06 05:50:43 PM  
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE​EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE​EEEEEEE

/24/7
 
2018-02-06 05:52:26 PM  
A few of you mentioned white noise. I have used fan in my room to sleep for the past 35 years. At first I used it to sleep during the day when I had to work nights. Now it is habit. Thankfully my tinnitus does not usually bother my sleep. Usually. Ugh.
Also, I went to a Deep Purple concert when I was about 18. At that time they were the "loudest" band in the world. My ears rang for 2 days after that. I think it was Blackmore's high notes that did the most damage.
Great concert though. c. 1975.

/old
 
2018-02-06 06:03:25 PM  
That second sound after the high pitched beep sounded like when I can hear my heartbeat (usually it's when I'm trying to sleep.) Unless it's not, and I actually have a problem.
 
2018-02-06 06:07:54 PM  
Mine's a low-volume sine wave at about 13k, which is right near the top of what I can usually hear (yeah, getting old). If I don't pay attention to it, I seldom notice the sound.

Don't forget that, along with loud noises, there's some evidence that long-term or heavy use of aspirin can also cause tinnitus. It's usually temporary, though.
 
2018-02-06 06:13:41 PM  
Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie (2/10) Movie CLIP - Rough Landing (1996) HD
Youtube nBQDz9PiMDU

"Now he knows what the world sounds like to Pete Townshend."
 
2018-02-06 06:25:30 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: CruiserTwelve: Explodo: Crowded areas are hard for conversation. Maybe I'm just old.

Sounds like you have the same type of tinnitus as I have, and the same type of hearing loss. I have the same problem hearing voices in a crowd, but interestingly there are a small number of people whose voices come across loud and clear. I don't know if it's the pitch of their voice or what.

Sounds a bit similar to me. I have had high pitch and low sounds hearing loss since birth. I can hear people in crowds but I can't understand what they're saying, it's weird. I also can't hear stuff like watch alarms and beeps, nor can I hear crickets. I can't listen to the example from TFA at work, but my tinnitus will just randomly show up as a sharp and painful high pitch squeal for about 5-10 seconds  and goes away and then my ear or ears hurt for a number of minutes afterwards.


I get the sharp spikes sometimes, but without any pain....just a sudden blast of extra scream in the ear that lasts for 10-60 seconds.
 
2018-02-06 06:25:59 PM  

darthaegis: cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring

Same here, sometimes it gets real loud.


The way I describe it is it sounds like the high pitch whine of a jet engine starting up just before the frequency gets to high to hear.
 
2018-02-06 06:26:45 PM  
i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 06:38:51 PM  

Linux_Yes: Nadie_AZ: Tinnitus sucks. But it doesn't have anything to do with your ears:

In 2004 Louis Lowry, an ear-nose-and-throat doctor at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, discovered that the caudate and the putamen play an important role in tinnitus by studying an unusual patient-himself.
As a young man, Lowry spent a summer working on a farm with a noisy tractor. The experience left him with partial hearing loss and a high-pitched ringing in his ears that plagued him for 40 years. Then at age 63, Lowry suffered a mild stroke. A CT scan and an MRI revealed that the stroke had damaged his caudate and putamen. But the stroke also brought a pleasant surprise. Lowry was completely cured of his tinnitus, without any further hearing loss.

source

Deaf people can have tinnitus. Weird and fascinating.

and excessive caffeine intake can give you tinnitus too.


And salt and pseudoephedrine as well.
 
2018-02-06 06:39:18 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Tinnitus sucks. But it doesn't have anything to do with your ears:

In 2004 Louis Lowry, an ear-nose-and-throat doctor at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, discovered that the caudate and the putamen play an important role in tinnitus by studying an unusual patient-himself.
As a young man, Lowry spent a summer working on a farm with a noisy tractor. The experience left him with partial hearing loss and a high-pitched ringing in his ears that plagued him for 40 years. Then at age 63, Lowry suffered a mild stroke. A CT scan and an MRI revealed that the stroke had damaged his caudate and putamen. But the stroke also brought a pleasant surprise. Lowry was completely cured of his tinnitus, without any further hearing loss.

source

Deaf people can have tinnitus. Weird and fascinating.


One of my aunts is mostly deaf because of tinnitus.

I have it too.  Partially a lot of ear infections, partially a lot of loud stuff with insufficient hearing protection before I wised up.

You know the sound a TV makes?  It's like that for me, except loud enough that I can hear it in all but loud environments.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y412f​w​rht3E

Almost that pitch, actually.

/reference: my laptop's cooler fan is in hovercraft mode, it is a little louder than that
 
2018-02-06 06:52:59 PM  

Explodo: Dingleberry Dickwad: CruiserTwelve: Explodo: Crowded areas are hard for conversation. Maybe I'm just old.

Sounds like you have the same type of tinnitus as I have, and the same type of hearing loss. I have the same problem hearing voices in a crowd, but interestingly there are a small number of people whose voices come across loud and clear. I don't know if it's the pitch of their voice or what.

Sounds a bit similar to me. I have had high pitch and low sounds hearing loss since birth. I can hear people in crowds but I can't understand what they're saying, it's weird. I also can't hear stuff like watch alarms and beeps, nor can I hear crickets. I can't listen to the example from TFA at work, but my tinnitus will just randomly show up as a sharp and painful high pitch squeal for about 5-10 seconds  and goes away and then my ear or ears hurt for a number of minutes afterwards.

I get the sharp spikes sometimes, but without any pain....just a sudden blast of extra scream in the ear that lasts for 10-60 seconds.


Dear gods I dunno if I could get the sharp loud ones for a full minute without going nuts. Sometimes I do get less painful ones that last longer, but they're still a high pitch tone, just not as loud and it kinda pulsates real fast.
 
2018-02-06 06:56:10 PM  

The5thElement: darthaegis: cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring

Same here, sometimes it gets real loud.

The way I describe it is it sounds like the high pitch whine of a jet engine starting up just before the frequency gets to high to hear.


my left ear has a slightly higher pitch ring than my right ear. Last hearing test i did as a volunteer for an aging/cognitive study, eyes fine, reaction excellent, memory excellent, hearing "not as good as i'd expect for somebody your age (38), and you should get that checked".
not my fault that when they put the big sound isolating earmuffs on me I can only hear BUZZZZZZ...
I spent a lot of time at punk shows damaging my hearing. and i shoot a lot (but i double up on foamy plugs and ear muffs, now).
Also, one of my dissertation committee members did research on salicylate induced tinnitus, and the acoustic startle response in rodents. we had fun talks.

Shirley Ujest: and excessive caffeine intake can give you tinnitus too.

And salt and pseudoephedrine as well.


aspirin is a major problem
 
2018-02-06 06:58:49 PM  
Ah, a tinnitus thread.  As an audiologist, here's my more-than-two-cents:

Tinnitus is a symptom. Just like a headache can mean anything from "you drank too much last night" to "you have a brain tumor," tinnitus can be caused by 100 different things.

Most remedies you see on TV and magazines are vasodialators, they are designed to increase blood flow in the cochlea (inner ear).  If your tinnitus is caused by lack of blood flow to the cochlea, such remedies will help you.  However, this etiology is relatively rare, so it doesn't work for most people.

The far more common cause of tinnitus is hearing loss.  Though not totally clinically correct, I describe tinnitus like phantom pain: an amputee has had his foot cut off, but can still feel his foot.  In the absence of normal stimulation, the body provides its own.

If the cause of your tinnitus is hearing loss, there is rarely any treatment that makes it go away, and cures you.   So it is imperative that you get a hearing test from an audiologist, and not a "free test" from a hearing aid dispenser.  While I have a lot of respect for hearing aid dispensers, their job is to test for the purposes of fitting hearing aids, and that's not what you need right now.  You need a full diagnostic audiological evaluation, which is usually covered by health insurance.

When you get a test, be very clear about the results.  There are many cases where there is hearing loss, but the loss is in certain frequency ranges and of mild severity, so there is often no recommendation for hearing aids, etc. So be clear: "are you telling my that my hearing is fully normal, or are you telling me that there is some hearing loss here that typically does not require any intervention?"  Because even mild hearing loss in a narrow frequency range can cause tinnitus that will drive you up a wall.

Next, make sure that the tinnitus is not a symptom of dire things and other serious health problems.  Like, brain tumors.  Google "acoustic neuroma" and see some CAT scans of some big tumors in the head; sometimes the only symptom is tinnitus.  This is not something to mess with; get your tail to an ENT physician.  If you have dizziness with tinnitus, if you don't go to a doctor I will kick you.

So, let's assume that you have tinnitus caused by hearing loss, or some other unexplainable condition.  The pills the doctor prescribed for you - probably a vasodialator or steroid - haven't done anything.  Though I have seen doctors prescribe Xanax - not to try to cure the tinnitus, but to make you not care that you have it.  But again, let's assume no other treatment has worked.  Here are the usual methods to treat (not cure) tinnitus:

1. Hearing aids. If you have hearing loss, hearing aids can mask out the tinnitus for the majority of patients.  Even if the hearing loss is not so bad that it is interfering with your daily life, hearing aids can give your ear the stimulation it needs so you don't hear the tinnitus (see my phantom pain explanation above).

2.   Masking - typically tinnitus is a narrow band signal, meaning that it is comprised of a narrow range of frequencies/pitches.  Imagine a tea kettle going off constantly and forever, or that piece of electronics that lets out a low but constant whine.  Maddening, right? So we have found that broad band signals can mask out or override the tinnitus and it is less maddening than the tinnitus.  Common maskers are the bed side machines that make the soothing sounds of ocean waves, or "tropical rain forest" or "mother's heartbeat".  These are especially good for people whose main problem is falling asleep with tinnitus.  There are also "ear level" maskers that look like hearing aids, but pump the masking noise into your ear.
3. Relaxation - have you ever been to a new place, and there's a sound going - wall unit air conditioner, fountain, or even a chiming clock - and you wonder "how do people live with that?"  Eventually, however, we tend to ignore it and it doesn't bother us.  It goes back to "fight or flight".  A new sound makes us stop and say "what the heck is that" until our minds are assured that it's nothing to pay attention to, so you can sleep all night and not be disturbed by the grandfather clock's chiming.  Most people hear their tinnitus, will always know it's there if they think about it, but it doesn't consume their lives.  There are some people, however, that are always in the "what the heck is that" mode and the tinnitus is distracting and annoying. I have seen people suicidal over it.  So relaxation techniques are used to get people past it.  Sometimes this is not explained well to the patient up front, so they go in thinking that these techniques will cure their tinnitus.  No, we're just trying to get you past the constant attention/obsession with the tinnitus, and into "yeah, it's still there if I think about it" mode.  Biofeedback, hypnosis/self hypnosis, and meditation are some of the techniques.

One of the common complaints I've had with people who use noise maskers and "spa music" relaxation aids is that these sounds interfere with hearing, especially if there's hearing loss going along with it.  So I was excited to see a hearing aid by Widex that can be programmed in an infinite variety of possibilities.  It has all three tinnitus treatments in one - amplification, masking noise, and relaxation music - built in.  So, if you're in quiet, the noise and music can be there to override your tinnitus.  But if there's a level of sound present, e.g., someone comes up and talks to you, the masking noise and music stop instantly so you can hear the sounds in the real world.  It's neat stuff and I think it will be beneficial to a lot of people.

So, here you have my canned, stock answer for people with tinnitus.  If you have any questions I can answer in the thread or you can send me a message. EIP.
 
2018-02-06 07:03:41 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Tinnitus sucks. But it doesn't have anything to do with your ears:

In 2004 Louis Lowry, an ear-nose-and-throat doctor at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, discovered that the caudate and the putamen play an important role in tinnitus by studying an unusual patient-himself.
As a young man, Lowry spent a summer working on a farm with a noisy tractor. The experience left him with partial hearing loss and a high-pitched ringing in his ears that plagued him for 40 years. Then at age 63, Lowry suffered a mild stroke. A CT scan and an MRI revealed that the stroke had damaged his caudate and putamen. But the stroke also brought a pleasant surprise. Lowry was completely cured of his tinnitus, without any further hearing loss.

source

Deaf people can have tinnitus. Weird and fascinating.


That's cool!  However as I noted above, tinnitus has many different causes.  A single-subject incident is a tiny piece of the pie.  In many cases tinnitus does have a lot to do with the ears.
 
2018-02-06 07:11:11 PM  
High-pitched whine here. Constant. Sometimes louder. Sometimes quieter. Always there.

I put on thunderstorm sounds to fall asleep, otherwise I end up laying in the dark hearing that nonstop tone and it drives me bonkers on occasion.
 
2018-02-06 07:35:27 PM  

cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring


Imagine six slightly discordant extremely high pitched notes being played on a glass armonica somewhere above and slightly behind your right ear, and two slightly discordant notes in front of your left ear, 24 hours a day
 
2018-02-06 07:38:36 PM  
You're all lucky. Mine sounds like "Photograph" by Nickelback.
 
2018-02-06 07:39:56 PM  

Earguy: Ah, a tinnitus thread.  As an audiologist, here's my more-than-two-cents:

Tinnitus is a symptom. Just like a headache can mean anything from "you drank too much last night" to "you have a brain tumor," tinnitus can be caused by 100 different things.

Most remedies you see on TV and magazines are vasodialators, they are designed to increase blood flow in the cochlea (inner ear).  If your tinnitus is caused by lack of blood flow to the cochlea, such remedies will help you.  However, this etiology is relatively rare, so it doesn't work for most people.

The far more common cause of tinnitus is hearing loss.  Though not totally clinically correct, I describe tinnitus like phantom pain: an amputee has had his foot cut off, but can still feel his foot.  In the absence of normal stimulation, the body provides its own.

If the cause of your tinnitus is hearing loss, there is rarely any treatment that makes it go away, and cures you.   So it is imperative that you get a hearing test from an audiologist, and not a "free test" from a hearing aid dispenser.  While I have a lot of respect for hearing aid dispensers, their job is to test for the purposes of fitting hearing aids, and that's not what you need right now.  You need a full diagnostic audiological evaluation, which is usually covered by health insurance.

When you get a test, be very clear about the results.  There are many cases where there is hearing loss, but the loss is in certain frequency ranges and of mild severity, so there is often no recommendation for hearing aids, etc. So be clear: "are you telling my that my hearing is fully normal, or are you telling me that there is some hearing loss here that typically does not require any intervention?"  Because even mild hearing loss in a narrow frequency range can cause tinnitus that will drive you up a wall.

Next, make sure that the tinnitus is not a symptom of dire things and other serious health problems.  Like, brain tumors.  Google "acoustic neuroma" and see s ...


Thank you for all of this.  I just got diagnosed with Meniere's disease a couple of months ago.  I haven't figured out what triggers my right-ear hearing loss (and I have so far been blessed by not having too much dizziness), but my ENT thinks that stress might be contributing.  I have cut back on the caffeine and salt and chocolate as recommended.

This didn't start with me until just after I got into a car accident in August.  I'm going to see an upper-cervical chiropractor on Friday to see if this is an upper spine misalignment due to undiagnosed whiplash.
 
2018-02-06 07:42:20 PM  

Earguy: Ah, a tinnitus thread. As an audiologist


Well, name checks out.

/i lold
 
2018-02-06 07:42:55 PM  

cman: That aint what my tinnitus sounds like

Its just a constant high pitch ring


Ditto. I'm 55 years old. I don't ever recall not having it.
 
2018-02-06 07:50:24 PM  
For me, it's a high-pitched, hissing tone. I've permanent T-tubes in both ears, thanks to decades of sinus & ear infections. I've had multiple eardrum ruptures.

I'm just resigned to it.
 
2018-02-06 07:52:58 PM  

Chemlight Battery: You're all lucky. Mine sounds like "Photograph" by Nickelback.


I assume that this was your suicide note and your "FARKer found dead" thread is coming up next week.
 
2018-02-06 07:55:27 PM  

Twonk: Thank you for all of this. I just got diagnosed with Meniere's disease a couple of months ago. I haven't figured out what triggers my right-ear hearing loss (and I have so far been blessed by not having too much dizziness), but my ENT thinks that stress might be contributing. I have cut back on the caffeine and salt and chocolate as recommended.

This didn't start with me until just after I got into a car accident in August. I'm going to see an upper-cervical chiropractor on Friday to see if this is an upper spine misalignment due to undiagnosed whiplash.


I'm going to go out on a limb and guess the answer the "upper-cervical chiropractor" will give you is "yes."  Now of course, there is absolutely no anatomical basis whatsoever for that.  No MD/DO in the entire universe will tell you it's your cervical spine that's causing Meniere's disease.  But the alternative medicine doc that believes all disease is because of spinal misalignment would be more than happy to tell you your ear problem is a spinal misalignment and take your money.  Oh and you're going to need regular "readjustments" or whatever the fark.

If you give a shiat about your money or your health, I recommend you look up the actual scientific data (there is a lot) on how effective chiropractors are in ... literally anything.  You will thank me.

If you do not give a shiat about your money or your health, do what you like but please know there is zero scientific evidence supporting any of what chiropractors do and the more time/money people waste there, the less they get their actual problems addressed by an actual medical professional.  So posting/saying anything that might lead someone to try a chiropractor is only going to cost them time and money.

/by the way, the actual mechanism and injury caused by whiplash is very well known to actual medical professionals
 
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