If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Turns out many animals can do math, often better than a fifth grader   ( nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Number, number sense, Spotted Hyena, sophisticated number sense, versatile number sense, innate number sense, male túngara frog, archaic number sense  
•       •       •

1298 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Feb 2018 at 7:20 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-02-06 04:33:19 PM  
One of my cats can count to two.  I give them two scoops of food at each meal.  If I just give him one, he'll sit there and glare at me until I put in the second scoop.
 
2018-02-06 05:39:14 PM  
I was told there would be no cat
 
2018-02-06 05:43:48 PM  

foo monkey: One of my cats can count to two.  I give them two scoops of food at each meal.  If I just give him one, he'll sit there and glare at me until I put in the second scoop.


Start giving 3 small scoops and see if you can teach him a new number
 
2018-02-06 05:44:29 PM  
Animals can count up to about 4 - (obvious survival value if know local lion pride has 4 members and you can only see 3) We know that even pre-language babies can count because they will stare longer at a 'surprising' number ie if they see 2 dolls put behind a screen but only 1 there when screen removed. Birds like crows can count - they will watch a farmer hide in ambush to shoot them - can't fool them by having 3 men go in and 2 come out, but you can bluff them if 4 go in and 3 come out
 
2018-02-06 07:24:47 PM  
How many of those animals do meth?
 
2018-02-06 08:05:34 PM  
Or at least better than the average Farker.

/Dnrtfa
 
2018-02-06 08:11:14 PM  
I know one of my cats could count to three.
 
2018-02-06 08:11:30 PM  
You know you're an animal mathematician when you can count the number of teeth in your entire pride with one paw.
/Am I doing this right?
 
2018-02-06 08:17:04 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 08:18:43 PM  

foo monkey: One of my cats can count to two.  I give them two scoops of food at each meal.  If I just give him one, he'll sit there and glare at me until I put in the second scoop.


is his name ''president"?
 
2018-02-06 09:12:34 PM  
Damnit subby. Leave the President alone! He still went to the best schools.
 
2018-02-06 09:20:07 PM  
Not just better than a fifth grader. On one of the tasks, young chimps could do something none of us could.
 
2018-02-06 10:03:10 PM  
Yep my mutt can count to at least three. I know this because he gets two pupperonis after he goes out for his evening contsitutional. Give him one and he sits there looking disappointed with you. Give him three and he gets very happy.

You also can't fool him by tearing one in half and giving him two servings that way.
 
2018-02-06 11:07:14 PM  
To be fair, animals don't have to learn common core.
 
2018-02-07 12:10:01 AM  
"Orb-weaving spiders, for example, keep a tally of how many silk-wrapped prey items are stashed in the "larder" segment of their web. When scientists experimentally remove the cache, the spiders will spend time searching for the stolen goods in proportion to how many separate items had been taken, rather than how big the total prey mass might have been."

I wonder how the spiders would react if you gave them back some of their stolen goods.
 
2018-02-07 02:01:21 AM  

Alex_Lee: "Orb-weaving spiders, for example, keep a tally of how many silk-wrapped prey items are stashed in the "larder" segment of their web. When scientists experimentally remove the cache, the spiders will spend time searching for the stolen goods in proportion to how many separate items had been taken, rather than how big the total prey mass might have been."

I wonder how the spiders would react if you gave them back some of their stolen goods.


I'd assume the spider doesn't go much beyond "lost" and "found". Not "Hey, someone is messing with me." Unlss they are directly prodded.

But I'm very interested in general about how other living things perceive us and our created environments. Even plants might respond if you talk to them. Studies of cats and dogs are most common, and all the usual jokes aside, dogs seem to actually perceive us as something unlike them as their behavior to humans is different than what it is between each other. Cats behavior toward humans doesn't indicate that trait. When they exhibit social behavior its exactly like what they show to other cats, especially their mother.

But how does an ant or spider perceive a human? Clearly they have some sense of us, we can be bittten if we provoke them. How would we perceive beings that are more than a million times more massive than us and could destroy our environments or crush our bodies on a whim?
 
2018-02-07 02:13:50 AM  

wxboy: How many of those animals do meth?


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 02:14:12 AM  

Boudyro: Alex_Lee: "Orb-weaving spiders, for example, keep a tally of how many silk-wrapped prey items are stashed in the "larder" segment of their web. When scientists experimentally remove the cache, the spiders will spend time searching for the stolen goods in proportion to how many separate items had been taken, rather than how big the total prey mass might have been."

I wonder how the spiders would react if you gave them back some of their stolen goods.

I'd assume the spider doesn't go much beyond "lost" and "found". Not "Hey, someone is messing with me." Unlss they are directly prodded.

But I'm very interested in general about how other living things perceive us and our created environments. Even plants might respond if you talk to them. Studies of cats and dogs are most common, and all the usual jokes aside, dogs seem to actually perceive us as something unlike them as their behavior to humans is different than what it is between each other. Cats behavior toward humans doesn't indicate that trait. When they exhibit social behavior its exactly like what they show to other cats, especially their mother.

But how does an ant or spider perceive a human? Clearly they have some sense of us, we can be bittten if we provoke them. How would we perceive beings that are more than a million times more massive than us and could destroy our environments or crush our bodies on a whim?


I am also interested in the perceptions of our fellow spaceship citizens. It amazes me how easily small kittens and puppies just adapt to being touched and picked up by gigantic beings unlike themselves.

It has to intimidating or even scary to live in a world that is not built for you. But cats and dogs seem to do ok. (Well, not always ok, I spent 10 years volunteering at my local shelter, so it's not always ok)
 
2018-02-07 04:06:18 AM  

baxterdog: Boudyro: Alex_Lee: "Orb-weaving spiders, for example, keep a tally of how many silk-wrapped prey items are stashed in the "larder" segment of their web. When scientists experimentally remove the cache, the spiders will spend time searching for the stolen goods in proportion to how many separate items had been taken, rather than how big the total prey mass might have been."

I wonder how the spiders would react if you gave them back some of their stolen goods.

I'd assume the spider doesn't go much beyond "lost" and "found". Not "Hey, someone is messing with me." Unlss they are directly prodded.

But I'm very interested in general about how other living things perceive us and our created environments. Even plants might respond if you talk to them. Studies of cats and dogs are most common, and all the usual jokes aside, dogs seem to actually perceive us as something unlike them as their behavior to humans is different than what it is between each other. Cats behavior toward humans doesn't indicate that trait. When they exhibit social behavior its exactly like what they show to other cats, especially their mother.

But how does an ant or spider perceive a human? Clearly they have some sense of us, we can be bittten if we provoke them. How would we perceive beings that are more than a million times more massive than us and could destroy our environments or crush our bodies on a whim?

I am also interested in the perceptions of our fellow spaceship citizens. It amazes me how easily small kittens and puppies just adapt to being touched and picked up by gigantic beings unlike themselves.

It has to intimidating or even scary to live in a world that is not built for you. But cats and dogs seem to do ok. (Well, not always ok, I spent 10 years volunteering at my local shelter, so it's not always ok)


I really like to think this is how dogs see us:
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 08:58:26 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-07 09:20:14 AM  

foo monkey: One of my cats can count to two.  I give them two scoops of food at each meal.  If I just give him one, he'll sit there and glare at me until I put in the second scoop.


What if you give him one big scoop so it's the same amount as if it was two scoops?
 
2018-02-07 10:18:05 AM  
not so much counting as recognizing greater and fewer
 
2018-02-07 01:36:23 PM  
My husband has taught our current Corgi prime numbers. Depending on the size of the treats she either gets 1, 3, or 5. She seems to know how many she is getting.
 
2018-02-07 01:42:16 PM  
US fifth grader or a fifth grader from another developed country?

/it matters
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report