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(Newsweek)   Take solace in knowing that you will probably never be as wrong about something as this guy was   ( newsweek.com) divider line
    More: Ironic, Internet, electronic town meetings, Internet addicts clamor, virtual communities, bulletin board, worldwide bulletin board, citizens band radio, World Wide Web  
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6060 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Feb 2018 at 10:35 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-06 09:26:39 AM  
That was an awesome read
 
2018-02-06 09:34:57 AM  
Cliff is a really interesting guy.  I have a number of his books.  First was "The Cuckoo's Egg", which is a narrative of the incident that made him famous in the first place, where he tracked down an East German computer hacker/spy, all based on a minor accounting glitch in the system he worked on.

I also have "Silicon Snake-Oil" and "High-Tech Heretic".  He was *WAY* off about the Internet in 1995, especially when it comes to Internet commerce.  He couldn't imagine a way back in 1995 that people would have enough trust in the network to purchase things over it.

But in some ways, he's not entirely wrong about the deleterious effects of the Internet either.
 
2018-02-06 09:59:02 AM  
Seems like plenty of what he said there is completely accurate
 
2018-02-06 10:24:35 AM  
We'll order airline tickets over the network, make restaurant reservations and negotiate sales contracts. Stores will become obselete. So how come my local mall does more business in an afternoon than the entire Internet handles in a month?

That's specious reasoning.
 
2018-02-06 10:26:21 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 10:33:08 AM  
The man with 1,000 Klein Bottles UNDER his house - Numberphile
Youtube -k3mVnRlQLU
 
2018-02-06 10:44:40 AM  
He's not wrong.
 
2018-02-06 10:51:07 AM  
And who'd prefer cybersex to the real thing?

Hey, for some people it's not really and either / or, but an I'll... ah, I mean they'll take what they can get.
 
2018-02-06 10:58:16 AM  
We'll order airline tickets over the network, make restaurant reservations and negotiate sales contracts. Stores will become obselete.

Correct on all counts!  This guy is a visionary!

Oh, wait, you were going to argue against those?  Ooo, so sorry.
 
2018-02-06 11:01:00 AM  
I think I had an exchange of letters with Stoll back in our USENET days. (Back in the USENET days, I embarrassed myself by having an exchange of letters with John McCarthy before I found out who he was. Hint: it was akin to someone selling windup dolls on the street discussing things with Thomas Edison.) For years I had a manuscript copy of The Cuckoos Egg. Why would I have had that?
 
2018-02-06 11:03:45 AM  

ArkAngel: Seems like plenty of what he said there is completely accurate


pup.socket: He's not wrong.


He's completely wrong.

I found the Battle of Trafalgar instantly. One Google search, and 3 of the top 5 results had the date right in the page summaryt on my Google search.

Malls are completely going our of business, thanks to Amazon and online shopping, like scary fast. Fiesta Mall in Az, for example, sold for $135 million in 2004, has now closed, and sold for $6.7 million last year. It was down to 4 total tenants. One of the most profitable malls in the southwest 10 years ago declined in price 95% in 13 years.

My daughter spends plenty of classroom time learning things on a computer.

People spend insane amounts of time on sex sites, sometimes ignoring their own relationships in favor of "cybersex".

We can read electronic books wherever we want, and with e-ink, it's even better. And yes, we can tote that to the beach.

Online voting is taking off, and nobody drops by a campaign office for literature on a candidate anymore, they just do it online.

And chat rooms? Just look at Fark.

This guy is wrong in every. single. aspect. of his article. I'm not even sure that he got his name right at this point.  And Jesus, this one: Yet Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we'll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Intenet. Uh, sure.

The problem with this guy is that he expected it to be an overnight thing. He was wrong about that, too. But just 5 years after this trainwreck, and he was already mostly wrong. 23 years later, we get to laugh at him on every point in his paper...
 
2018-02-06 11:03:52 AM  
Actually, that 'off target' 1995 anti-Internet column was amazingly on-target

Stoll predicted that the Web would be a fount of misleading information and outright lies, that it would be oversold as a tool for education and governing, and that it would isolate people more than bring them together.

That sounds familiar

"Every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly," Stoll observed, referring to the online chat community then known as Usenet. "The result? Every voice is heard. The cacophony more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harassment, and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen."

Stoll predicted 4chan
 
2018-02-06 11:11:26 AM  

sirrerun: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/-k3mVnRl​QLU]


I'm glad someone else caught this.

It's important to understand that Cliff is... different. Very, very different.

He was wrong about commerce, mainly because he couldn't foresee secure transactions and broadband. Once those hurdles were cleared, the end of brick-and-mortar as we knew it was easily visible. Almost Everything in his anti-internet-business tirade flows from those. However, regarding his belief that the unfiltered nature of internet information being a bad thing... welp, there's a rise in antivax, flat-earth, the entire Infowars wing, etc. He was completely correct there.
 
2018-02-06 11:13:40 AM  

Mikey1969: This guy is wrong in every. single. aspect. of his article.


I dunno, I'd give him this bit:

The Usenet, a worldwide bulletin board, allows anyone to post messages across the nation. Your word gets out, leapfrogging editors and publishers. Every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly. The result? Every voice is heard. The cacophany more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harrasment, and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen.

Sure, it's the one correct needle in a haystack of wrongness... but I think that piece is on point.
 
2018-02-06 11:15:10 AM  

slackananda: [img.fark.net image 749x500]


Those icons are very scattered across his desktop.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 11:17:59 AM  

dittybopper: Cliff is a really interesting guy.  I have a number of his books.  First was "The Cuckoo's Egg", which is a narrative of the incident that made him famous in the first place, where he tracked down an East German computer hacker/spy, all based on a minor accounting glitch in the system he worked on.

I enjoyed that book as well.  I read it on the recommendation of a friend of mine who has a one line mention in the book (Ken Crepea).

I also have "Silicon Snake-Oil" and "High-Tech Heretic".  He was *WAY* off about the Internet in 1995, especially when it comes to Internet commerce.  He couldn't imagine a way back in 1995 that people would have enough trust in the network to purchase things over it.

But in some ways, he's not entirely wrong about the deleterious effects of the Internet either.

Agreed.
 
2018-02-06 11:20:32 AM  
He was basing his predictions about the internet on the fact that it hadn't completely taken over yet. Online sales dominance won't happen because look, it hasn't happened yet. Subby was right.
 
2018-02-06 11:22:45 AM  
Try reading a book on disc. At best, it's an unpleasant chore: the myopic glow of a clunky computer replaces the friendly pages of a book.

That's why I set my Kindle reader so I can read new stuff with the tan glow of old paper.
 
2018-02-06 11:25:30 AM  

raygundan: Mikey1969: This guy is wrong in every. single. aspect. of his article.

I dunno, I'd give him this bit:

The Usenet, a worldwide bulletin board, allows anyone to post messages across the nation. Your word gets out, leapfrogging editors and publishers. Every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly. The result? Every voice is heard. The cacophany more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harrasment, and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen.

Sure, it's the one correct needle in a haystack of wrongness... but I think that piece is on point.


Yeah, that was the only place where he really came close to 'right'... But he immediately drowned it out with that derp on electronic publishing. I think his problem is not being able to envision anything other than the CRT monitor sitting on his desk, and a wired modem connection. If we were all still only on desktops, there was no option but CRT screens, and WiFi and mobile data didn't exist, he might have a point, but WiFi wasn't a reach, since it's just radio waves, and flatscreens were already envisioned in SciFI, as well as tablets(They had them in 2001: A Space Odyssey). The guy just couldn't see the technology possibly changing to accommodate these ideas for the internet.

Here are those tablets, BTW:
i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 11:27:11 AM  

WelldeadLink: Try reading a book on disc. At best, it's an unpleasant chore: the myopic glow of a clunky computer replaces the friendly pages of a book.

That's why I set my Kindle reader so I can read new stuff with the tan glow of old paper.


What will be interesting is when displays surpass the resolution and clarity of paper. It happened a while ago for audio. Digital audio far surpassed the quality of analog media decades ago, but one day there'll be portable displays that look like paper and actually exceed it in every respect. You'll have tons of people arguing how the imperfections in the text make a printed book so much better on the eyes.
 
2018-02-06 11:27:50 AM  
pics.onsizzle.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 11:40:21 AM  

Mikey1969: ArkAngel: Seems like plenty of what he said there is completely accurate

pup.socket: He's not wrong.

He's completely wrong.

I found the Battle of Trafalgar instantly. One Google search, and 3 of the top 5 results had the date right in the page summaryt on my Google search.

Malls are completely going our of business, thanks to Amazon and online shopping, like scary fast. Fiesta Mall in Az, for example, sold for $135 million in 2004, has now closed, and sold for $6.7 million last year. It was down to 4 total tenants. One of the most profitable malls in the southwest 10 years ago declined in price 95% in 13 years.

My daughter spends plenty of classroom time learning things on a computer.

People spend insane amounts of time on sex sites, sometimes ignoring their own relationships in favor of "cybersex".

We can read electronic books wherever we want, and with e-ink, it's even better. And yes, we can tote that to the beach.

Online voting is taking off, and nobody drops by a campaign office for literature on a candidate anymore, they just do it online.

And chat rooms? Just look at Fark.

This guy is wrong in every. single. aspect. of his article. I'm not even sure that he got his name right at this point.  And Jesus, this one: Yet Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we'll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Intenet. Uh, sure.

The problem with this guy is that he expected it to be an overnight thing. He was wrong about that, too. But just 5 years after this trainwreck, and he was already mostly wrong. 23 years later, we get to laugh at him on every point in his paper...


When everyone has a voice, no one will be heard. He was most definitively correct about that, so he has that going for him.
 
2018-02-06 11:49:34 AM  
When everyone has a voice, no one will be heard. He was most definitively correct about that, so he has that going for him.

I AM SPARTACUS!
 
2018-02-06 11:55:58 AM  

Mikey1969: he might have a point, but WiFi wasn't a reach, since it's just radio waves


I guarantee you he knows about radio waves:  He's an amateur extra class ham radio operator, and back in the 1990's, he would have known about packet radio, which is computer networking at slow speeds over vhf/uhf frequencies.  My first real e-mail address was [my callsign]@ka2tcq.ampr.org, and I had to hit the KA2TCQ mail server it via a couple different packet nodes between my then home location and its location in Plattsburgh, NY, roughly 100 miles away or so.
 
2018-02-06 11:57:39 AM  

WelldeadLink: When everyone has a voice, no one will be heard. He was most definitively correct about that, so he has that going for him.

I AM SPARTACUS!


i.ytimg.comView Full Size


He's not Spartacus, he's a very naughty boy!
 
2018-02-06 12:03:45 PM  

Russ1642: WelldeadLink: Try reading a book on disc. At best, it's an unpleasant chore: the myopic glow of a clunky computer replaces the friendly pages of a book.

That's why I set my Kindle reader so I can read new stuff with the tan glow of old paper.

What will be interesting is when displays surpass the resolution and clarity of paper. It happened a while ago for audio. Digital audio far surpassed the quality of analog media decades ago, but one day there'll be portable displays that look like paper and actually exceed it in every respect. You'll have tons of people arguing how the imperfections in the text make a printed book so much better on the eyes.


Actually, I'll not argue that, but I will argue that a printed book doesn't require any technology to read it.

I got into an argument over on reddit about a hypothetical storage of data in case society collapses, and people talking about how you could store all this huge amount of information on how to rebuild society on things like microSD cards and thumb drives and smartphones and I was like "OK, so you think that if technology goes tits-up, that technology is the answer to bring technology back?".

They couldn't conceive of the inherent contradiction of relying on technology that quite possibly might not be accessible in order to bring technology back.
 
2018-02-06 12:05:10 PM  

Mikey1969: Malls are completely going our of business, thanks to Amazon and online shopping, like scary fast. Fiesta Mall in Az, for example, sold for $135 million in 2004, has now closed, and sold for $6.7 million last year. It was down to 4 total tenants. One of the most profitable malls in the southwest 10 years ago declined in price 95% in 13 years.


A piece of property going for less than it was worth at one point doesn't mean they are going away.  Malls are evolving and changing with the times.  They are turning into entertainment complexes and lifestyle centers by adding apartments and condos.  Heck - even Amazon recognizes it needs brick and mortar to capture retail market share.  Of which it only has 4%.

Mikey1969: People spend insane amounts of time on sex sites, sometimes ignoring their own relationships in favor of "cybersex".


The internet didn't invent porn or ignoring your family.

Mikey1969: Online voting is taking off, and nobody drops by a campaign office for literature on a candidate anymore, they just do it online.


Online voting is not taking off. Advertising and the act of voting are two different things.  There isn't any real reason to move voting online and states are throwing away their digital voting machines.

Stoll is wrong but you aren't doing much better.
 
2018-02-06 12:14:13 PM  

Mikey1969: If we were all still only on desktops, there was no option but CRT screens


Heh, yeah.  It's not like it was hard to imagine something else.  But even then, I remember reading this article when it came out... and at the time, I read lots of e-books on my CRT.  It was fine, because I was used to it.  I grew up staring at text on CRTs, and reading things on them felt as normal to me as reading on paper did to him.

I'm sure somebody biatched about how reading on paper wasn't as good as stone tablets for a while, too.  With a bunch of nonsense complaints like "the light shines right through from the other side, making the text a jumble with what's on the back.  you never have that problem with stone tablets!" or "paper just blows away in a stiff breeze and can't handle moisture!  all the world's knowledge will be lost the first time we have a storm!"
 
2018-02-06 12:19:51 PM  

Russ1642: You'll have tons of people arguing how the imperfections in the text make a printed book so much better on the eyes.


And eventually, we'll have displays so good that you can take your pristine representation, and apply whatever sort of imperfection or distortion you prefer to it in realtime.  Like how we artificially add "film grain" to video today.

I look forward to my kindle having an option to look like it was hand-typeset, only one of the six guys who worked on it puts too much ink on his pages, so roughly one in six of the pages looks like a combination between bold type and smudges, and six of the 200-odd lower-case "e" blocks they use have distinct scratches or notches in them, but they only use those on pages where they run out of good "e"s to use, and when there's REALLY a lot of "e"s on a page they borrow some from an entirely different font.
 
2018-02-06 12:22:04 PM  
memecrunch.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-06 12:27:41 PM  

raygundan: Russ1642: You'll have tons of people arguing how the imperfections in the text make a printed book so much better on the eyes.

And eventually, we'll have displays so good that you can take your pristine representation, and apply whatever sort of imperfection or distortion you prefer to it in realtime.  Like how we artificially add "film grain" to video today.

I look forward to my kindle having an option to look like it was hand-typeset, only one of the six guys who worked on it puts too much ink on his pages, so roughly one in six of the pages looks like a combination between bold type and smudges, and six of the 200-odd lower-case "e" blocks they use have distinct scratches or notches in them, but they only use those on pages where they run out of good "e"s to use, and when there's REALLY a lot of "e"s on a page they borrow some from an entirely different font.


And artificial intelligence (as opposed to a truly sentient Digital Intelligence) will be good enough to do all that from the command "make it look all old style printed"
 
2018-02-06 12:31:39 PM  
Even if there were a trustworthy way to send money over the Internet-which there isn't-the network is missing a most essential ingredient of capitalism: salespeople.

LOL
 
2018-02-06 12:36:32 PM  
Mikey1969:
This guy is wrong in every. single. aspect. of his article.

"What the Internet hucksters won't tell you is the Internet is one big ocean of unedited data, without any pretense of completeness. Lacking editors, reviewers or critics, the Internet has become a wasteland of unfiltered data. You don't know what to ignore and what's worth reading. "


That is just as true today as it was in 1995.
 
2018-02-06 12:38:50 PM  

BKITU: sirrerun: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/-k3mVnRl​QLU]

I'm glad someone else caught this.

It's important to understand that Cliff is... different. Very, very different.

He was wrong about commerce, mainly because he couldn't foresee secure transactions and broadband. Once those hurdles were cleared, the end of brick-and-mortar as we knew it was easily visible. Almost Everything in his anti-internet-business tirade flows from those. However, regarding his belief that the unfiltered nature of internet information being a bad thing... welp, there's a rise in antivax, flat-earth, the entire Infowars wing, etc. He was completely correct there.


Sort of.  It wasn't so much that the Internet ended up being isolating so much as it allows people to much more easily gather into cliques of like-minded people and gives them (or the moderators) the ability to shut out views and opinions of outsiders that don't agree with them.  It's isolating on a group level (for some groups), but not an individual one.

But I'm not so sure that's the norm so much as it is us seeing and hearing the vocal minority more clearly because they shout more loudly while the good things the Internet has done to bring people together and disseminate information more easily gets drowned out in the cacophony.  Does it make a difference, though?  Probably not.  Perception is reality, and those few who shout the loudest are the ones who shape perception for the many who don't bother with their own due diligence in sussing out the truth -- and that's a failing in us, not the Internet.
 
2018-02-06 12:49:03 PM  

dittybopper: I got into an argument over on reddit about a hypothetical storage of data in case society collapses, and people talking about how you could store all this huge amount of information on how to rebuild society on things like microSD cards and thumb drives and smartphones and I was like "OK, so you think that if technology goes tits-up, that technology is the answer to bring technology back?".

They couldn't conceive of the inherent contradiction of relying on technology that quite possibly might not be accessible in order to bring technology back.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaceho​u​nds_of_IPC
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/20857​

Guy has to make tools to make tools to make machinery, etc.
 
2018-02-06 01:21:03 PM  
Whenever I have coworkers or employees complain about some new technology that is being rolled out at their location I point them to this article.

/I swear if I hear someone moan that the old way was easier one more time...
 
2018-02-06 01:27:30 PM  

dittybopper: Mikey1969: he might have a point, but WiFi wasn't a reach, since it's just radio waves

I guarantee you he knows about radio waves:  He's an amateur extra class ham radio operator, and back in the 1990's, he would have known about packet radio, which is computer networking at slow speeds over vhf/uhf frequencies.  My first real e-mail address was [my callsign]@ka2tcq.ampr.org, and I had to hit the KA2TCQ mail server it via a couple different packet nodes between my then home location and its location in Plattsburgh, NY, roughly 100 miles away or so.


Yeah, I didn't think he wouldn't know about radio waves, but he's amazingly short sighted. Hell, Asimov, Heinlein and Clarke figured this shiat out decades before any of us even thought it was possible to own a computer that would fit in our houses.
 
2018-02-06 01:34:10 PM  

Mikey1969: Hell, Asimov, Heinlein and Clarke figured this shiat out decades before any of us even thought it was possible to own a computer that would fit in our houses.


Although many of them thought that we'd have an electric typewriter or intercom, with the massive computer elsewhere.
 
2018-02-06 01:35:20 PM  

sirrerun: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/-k3mVnRl​QLU]


I have one of his Klein bottles on the shelf behind me as I type this.

img.fark.netView Full Size


(Second from the left.)
 
2018-02-06 01:36:20 PM  

standardeviation: Whenever I have coworkers or employees complain about some new technology that is being rolled out at their location I point them to this article.

/I swear if I hear someone moan that the old way was easier one more time...


https://smile.amazon.com/Horse-Supply​-​Whip-Carriage-Driving/dp/B016WZVOJC/
 
2018-02-06 01:38:03 PM  

yakmans_dad: (Back in the USENET days, I embarrassed myself by having an exchange of letters with John McCarthy before I found out who he was. Hint: it was akin to someone selling windup dolls on the street discussing things with Thomas Edison.)


And ((geeze)), what's with all those stupid parentheses?
 
2018-02-06 01:40:57 PM  

Ambitwistor: yakmans_dad: (Back in the USENET days, I embarrassed myself by having an exchange of letters with John McCarthy before I found out who he was. Hint: it was akin to someone selling windup dolls on the street discussing things with Thomas Edison.)

And ((geeze)), what's with all those stupid parentheses?


(((It))) is a thing.
 
2018-02-06 01:43:20 PM  

yakmans_dad: I think I had an exchange of letters with Stoll back in our USENET days. (Back in the USENET days, I embarrassed myself by having an exchange of letters with John McCarthy before I found out who he was. Hint: it was akin to someone selling windup dolls on the street discussing things with Thomas Edison.) For years I had a manuscript copy of The Cuckoos Egg. Why would I have had that?


ROFL. This totally reverses what you meant:
John Michael McCarthy is a former American mixed martial arts referee, perhaps best known for his officiating of numerous bouts promoted by the Ultimate Fighting Championship dating back to UFC 2. Wikipedia
 
2018-02-06 01:44:29 PM  

Ambitwistor: sirrerun: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/-k3mVnRl​QLU]

I have one of his Klein bottles on the shelf behind me as I type this.
(Second from the left.)


I have third from the right. At home. Full of water. Dead, sterile water.
 
2018-02-06 01:46:06 PM  

Ambitwistor: yakmans_dad: (Back in the USENET days, I embarrassed myself by having an exchange of letters with John McCarthy before I found out who he was. Hint: it was akin to someone selling windup dolls on the street discussing things with Thomas Edison.)

And ((geeze)), what's with all those stupid parentheses?


They're (((globalists)))?
 
2018-02-06 01:47:55 PM  

WelldeadLink: Mikey1969: Hell, Asimov, Heinlein and Clarke figured this shiat out decades before any of us even thought it was possible to own a computer that would fit in our houses.

Although many of them thought that we'd have an electric typewriter or intercom, with the massive computer elsewhere.


Yeah, this was before the age of the silicon chip, vacuum tubes take up a lot of space. But even then, they envisioned wearable tech.

And we DO have the computer elsewhere for much of what we do. anything over the internet is using a computer elsewhere, and having worked at an eBay data center, I can tell you that something as simple as looking at things to buy online is tens of thousands of computers elsewhere...
 
2018-02-06 01:52:01 PM  
Meh, he got the social side of things correct. He just failed to anticipate the rapid advancement of the technology and underestimated the incredible laziness of the average American.
 
2018-02-06 01:54:54 PM  

WelldeadLink: Mikey1969: Hell, Asimov, Heinlein and Clarke figured this shiat out decades before any of us even thought it was possible to own a computer that would fit in our houses.

Although many of them thought that we'd have an electric typewriter or intercom, with the massive computer elsewhere.


That seemed wrong for a while after the demise of VT-100-style dumb terminals vanished, and then started to seem at least partly correct again more recently as tons of stuff moves into "the cloud."
 
2018-02-06 01:58:03 PM  

gingerjet: Mikey1969: Malls are completely going our of business, thanks to Amazon and online shopping, like scary fast. Fiesta Mall in Az, for example, sold for $135 million in 2004, has now closed, and sold for $6.7 million last year. It was down to 4 total tenants. One of the most profitable malls in the southwest 10 years ago declined in price 95% in 13 years.

A piece of property going for less than it was worth at one point doesn't mean they are going away.  Malls are evolving and changing with the times.  They are turning into entertainment complexes and lifestyle centers by adding apartments and condos.  Heck - even Amazon recognizes it needs brick and mortar to capture retail market share.  Of which it only has 4%.


BUT THEY AREN'T PLACES FOR SHOPPING.

Why? Because of shopping online, which is the point.

Mikey1969: People spend insane amounts of time on sex sites, sometimes ignoring their own relationships in favor of "cybersex".

The internet didn't invent porn or ignoring your family.


He said nobody would care about "cybersex", which is so prevalent on the farking internet that there's even a song about it.

He's a farking moron, and he isn't gonna let you suck him off for defending him so poorly. He couldn't see past the end of his nose on one of the most easy to spot items, and this was right on the cusp of it taking off. In '95, people were discovering the internet, and nothing has been the same since. It's not like he wrote this article in 1965, when computers were the size of rooms, and hard drives were the size of a refrigerator. Hell, the precursor to WiFi was patented 4 years BEFORE he wrote this, and back in 1971, Hawaii had used the packet network ditty mentioned upthread to connect the islands wirelessly.

This guy sucks as a tech prognosticator, the evidence for expansion was right farking there in front of him, and he could see NONE of it.
 
2018-02-06 01:58:46 PM  

Cry Hentai And Release The Tentacles of War!: Meh, he got the social side of things correct. He just failed to anticipate the rapid advancement of the technology and underestimated the incredible laziness of the average American.


Because only America uses the internet for recreation. Got it.
 
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