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(Business Insider)   Elon Musk will test the Eagle Heavy by using a Tesla Roadster as the test payload. Seems like a Ford Comet would be a better choice   ( businessinsider.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Rocket, Falcon Heavy, Spaceflight, Musk, Elon Musk, Falcon Heavy rocket, Hohmann transfer orbit, Launch Complex 39A  
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640 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Feb 2018 at 5:16 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-02-05 04:27:50 PM  
Meanwhile, my 86 VW Scirocco is refusing to start. On the upside, I'm now sitting in a pub drinking Dogfish Head 90 and eating fish and chips hoping it feels better soon.
 
2018-02-05 05:25:25 PM  
Eagle?

/DNRTA
 
2018-02-05 05:26:52 PM  

RoomFullOfMonkeys: Eagle?

/DNRTA


Yeah, like, a really heavy falcon.
 
2018-02-05 05:32:30 PM  
Robin, it should be a Robin...
Top Gear : Robin Reliant Space Shuttle Challenge - Top Gear - BBC
Youtube pJdrlWR-yFM
 
2018-02-05 05:35:49 PM  
If I had a Ford Comet in good enough condition to use for photo ops, I wouldn't sell it to somebody who was going to launch it orbit around the sun.
 
2018-02-05 05:55:43 PM  
I thought the Comet was a Mercury vehicle.

2040-cars.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 05:58:42 PM  
Would like a word...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 05:59:15 PM  
Surely you mean a Plymouth Satellite, subby.
assets.hemmings.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 06:25:27 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

I think I know where he got the idea.
 
2018-02-05 06:25:56 PM  

PunkTiger: I thought the Comet was a Mercury vehicle.

[2040-cars.com image 500x375]


If it falls back to earth it would be a Mercury Meteor.
 
2018-02-05 06:49:44 PM  
I just finished a spiffy Android game named Space Agency.  The last mission uses a reusable rocket (that you have to land) to put a car into orbit.  Cracked me up.

/Much like Kerbal Space Program but the physics are relaxed.
 
2018-02-05 07:01:42 PM  

PunkTiger: I thought the Comet was a Mercury vehicle.

[2040-cars.com image 500x375]


Doh!
 
2018-02-05 07:04:46 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
What a Eagle Heavy may look like.
Even tho TFA refers to it as the Falcon Heavy.


/Yes, the Comet was Mercury not Ford.
//Same platform as the Ford Falcon.
///Which is what the rocket is called.
////THERE ARE FOUR SLASHIES!
 
2018-02-05 07:05:11 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 07:49:08 PM  
Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?

Plus you run the risk of it falling back to Earth.  The resultant cratering would be an extinction level event.
 
2018-02-05 07:59:55 PM  
They really need to play Radar Rider on the video feed as the car is deployed, if it actually makes it.
 
2018-02-05 08:01:45 PM  

tyyreaunn: Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?


Amazingly, a Falcon Heavy could launch a 1974 Ford Country Squire wagon to Pluto with significant margins.
 
2018-02-05 08:09:02 PM  
If its anything like my old Chevy Nova, It'll light up the night sky!

/Why does everything smell blue?
 
2018-02-05 08:17:32 PM  
Is anyone else bugged by this?

They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?
 
2018-02-05 08:19:34 PM  
jaytkay:


They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?

Not really, no.
 
2018-02-05 08:20:16 PM  
What Eagle Heavy may look like.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 08:27:36 PM  

Hollie Maea: jaytkay:


They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?

Not really, no.


Why not a nice camera? Or a reflector like Echo?
 
2018-02-05 08:36:59 PM  

PunkTiger: I thought the Comet was a Mercury vehicle.

[2040-cars.com image 500x375]


It was.  It was the Mercury version of the... Falcon.

/in some years.  Other years it was the Fairlane.
 
2018-02-05 08:37:48 PM  

jaytkay: Hollie Maea: jaytkay:


They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?

Not really, no.

Why not a nice camera? Or a reflector like Echo?


the rocket in all likely-hood is going to blow up.. spectacularly. making spacecraft is hard and expensive. even the "cheap" ones I doubt they want to spend the time money and manpower on something that will likely explode. there are probably a couple hundred if not thousands of other factors involved with making a satellite work. even if money wasn't an option the orbit it is on might not make it possible to communicate with it. considering that a normal dummy payload is boring ass concrete this is pretty cool. we will get a couple of awesome pics before the batteries die and hopefully in a couple hundred thousand years confuse the shiat out of some aliens.
 
2018-02-05 08:38:29 PM  
because it's about weight
 
2018-02-05 08:40:12 PM  

tyyreaunn: Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?

Plus you run the risk of it falling back to Earth.  The resultant cratering would be an extinction level event.


You'd be surprised.

A '68 Olds Cutlass weighs about what a subcompact does today.
 
2018-02-05 08:46:14 PM  

jaytkay: Is anyone else bugged by this?

They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?


I've seen you, and others, post comments of this nature in multiple threads. I believe you mean well, but your commenting out of emotion. The point of this launch is to test the vehicle itself. That's it. Understand that this isn't a government vehicle that's being developed on the taxpayer dime. It's an entirely private mission; and as their own customer, SpaceX gets to be the arbiter deciding what constitutes "useful". To them, there is no waste; especially if they can achieve their goal of demo-ing direct GEO insertion by showing the second stage can survive an extended coast.

If you go to rocketbuilder, or look at any other provider's user guides, you'll see a laundry list of other services that are offered besides the launch itself. Payload integration need to be planned. It takes time and money to do that, and you can't just bolt one on randomly because there's room left over. Most payload owners wouldn't want to roll the dice on a new vehicle, and SpaceX doesn't want to deal with the added hassle of managing someone else's requirements. Thus, the roadster. This is something you simply need to come to peace with.

And by the way, one can't ignore the massive ROI that roadster is generating from a PR standpoint. Fark alone has had 4 or 5 articles on this launch in as many days. People, and customers, are watching.
 
2018-02-05 08:53:53 PM  

Mister Peejay: tyyreaunn: Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?

Plus you run the risk of it falling back to Earth.  The resultant cratering would be an extinction level event.

You'd be surprised.

A '68 Olds Cutlass weighs about what a subcompact does today.


I'm thinking that's not quite true
 
2018-02-05 08:59:06 PM  

cretinbob: Mister Peejay: tyyreaunn: Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?

Plus you run the risk of it falling back to Earth.  The resultant cratering would be an extinction level event.

You'd be surprised.

A '68 Olds Cutlass weighs about what a subcompact does today.

I'm thinking that's not quite true


A low options Cutlass was about 2800lb.

A Fiesta ST also weighs about 2800lb.
 
2018-02-05 09:07:30 PM  

Flt209er: roll the dice


Should also note that in this case, it's more of a "flip the coin" situation; as Elon himself is only giving this flight 50/50 odds of success.
 
2018-02-05 09:23:58 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 09:33:10 PM  

Mister Peejay: PunkTiger: I thought the Comet was a Mercury vehicle.

[2040-cars.com image 500x375]

It was.  It was the Mercury version of the... Falcon.

/in some years.  Other years it was the Fairlane.


And yet other years it was the Maverick
 
2018-02-05 09:39:58 PM  

Flt209er: Payload integration need to be planned. It takes time and money to do that, and you can't just bolt one on randomly


OK, Sparky. Yep. Meticulous planning over years and years.

Clearly they spent many years planning to put an automobile with thousands of moving parts and bolts and welds in there as payload.

Yep. Painstaking engineering and planning.
 
2018-02-05 10:15:09 PM  

jaytkay: Flt209er: Payload integration need to be planned. It takes time and money to do that, and you can't just bolt one on randomly

OK, Sparky. Yep. Meticulous planning over years and years.

Clearly they spent many years planning to put an automobile with thousands of moving parts and bolts and welds in there as payload.

Yep. Painstaking engineering and planning.


OK - since it's your idea, you come up with a design for a device that will operate in space.  Must be able to withstand the launch stresses, radiation, extreme temperature gradients and vacuum for starters.  Must also include its own power supply or generation facility (same environmental constraints).  Now build the damn thing and get it approved by NASA.

The options were:

- lump of concrete
- lump of steel
- convertible
 
2018-02-05 10:29:21 PM  

Ignoramist: The options were:

- lump of concrete
- lump of steel
- convertible


D. Use a proven design that is already flying

I guess I must be a wizard.
 
2018-02-05 10:36:03 PM  

jaytkay: Flt209er: Payload integration need to be planned. It takes time and money to do that, and you can't just bolt one on randomly

OK, Sparky. Yep. Meticulous planning over years and years.

Clearly they spent many years planning to put an automobile with thousands of moving parts and bolts and welds in there as payload.

Yep. Painstaking engineering and planning.


Like I said; emotion and not reason. One last try.

It's far easier to integrate your own payload on your own terms; especially if it doesn't do anything "scientifically useful". Do you not understand that life is easier without someone else telling you what to do? And by the way, not sure why you brought "years and years" into this, but that roadster still took "months and months" to ready for flight.

jaytkay: I guess I must be a wizard.


Of the pinball variety, I suspect.
 
2018-02-05 10:44:04 PM  

jaytkay: Flt209er: Payload integration need to be planned. It takes time and money to do that, and you can't just bolt one on randomly

OK, Sparky. Yep. Meticulous planning over years and years.

Clearly they spent many years planning to put an automobile with thousands of moving parts and bolts and welds in there as payload.

Yep. Painstaking engineering and planning.


To be fair, it is a hell of a lot easier if you don't need the payload to work once you get it up there
 
2018-02-05 10:44:11 PM  

Mister Peejay: cretinbob: Mister Peejay: tyyreaunn: Wouldn't any 60s or 70s era Ford greatly exceed the weight allowance of any modern rocket?

Plus you run the risk of it falling back to Earth.  The resultant cratering would be an extinction level event.

You'd be surprised.

A '68 Olds Cutlass weighs about what a subcompact does today.

I'm thinking that's not quite true

A low options Cutlass was about 2800lb.

A Fiesta ST also weighs about 2800lb.


Huh. I always just assumed older cars were heavier
 
2018-02-05 10:49:40 PM  

Flt209er: Like I said; emotion and not reason.


OK, Spock. You sure told me.
 
2018-02-05 10:55:53 PM  
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 11:06:08 PM  

jaytkay: Ignoramist: The options were:

- lump of concrete
- lump of steel
- convertible

D. Use a proven design that is already flying

I guess I must be a wizard.


Let's examine that. the smallest cheapest proven design of a satellite would be a cubesat. at 1.3kg and approximately 7.5k each it would take 950 of them to equal the weight of the Tesla roadster, (remember the real reason for the dummy payload is to simulate the weight of an actual mission). 7.5k was the cheapest price I could find in a quick search. feel free to prove it wrong, most sites listed cost of the hardware + launch at around 40k per cubesat but for the sake of argument lets assume that spacex would be eating the cost of the launch. You're looking at 7,125,000 for just the cubesats. which by the way are not rated for anything more than LEO and even then its very limited. maybe a month at most. That doesn't include any of the mounting and deployment hardware you'd need to deploy 950 satellites successfully.

space is hard. and expensive.
 
2018-02-05 11:10:34 PM  

khitsicker: That doesn't include any of the mounting and deployment hardware you'd need to deploy 950 satellites successfully.


Because the only two choices are 1 Tesla automobile or 950 cubesats.

Yep. No other choices.

Wow. I am so embarrassed.
 
2018-02-05 11:12:37 PM  
Musky needs to concentrate on getting his car factory to actually make cars, not put them in orbit.
 
2018-02-05 11:13:17 PM  
i chose the cheapest. what do you suggest. a single cubesat isn't going to do much to test the rocket. if you can find a fullsize satellite for less than 7mil post it.
 
2018-02-05 11:14:08 PM  

jaytkay: Ignoramist: The options were:

- lump of concrete
- lump of steel
- convertible

D. Use a proven design that is already flying

I guess I must be a wizard.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 11:24:38 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-05 11:27:55 PM  

Edgewood Dirk: What Eagle Heavy may look like.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


I read somewhere that Space 1999 appeared unexpectedly during the making of Star Wars, and it kind of messed things up because their Eagle ships looked a lot like what the Millenium Falcon was going to look like:

img.fark.netView Full Size


So Lucas had to come up with a completely different idea.

We ended up with this thing instead:
img.fark.netView Full Size


IIRC the original Falcon design lived on, in a somewhat changed form, as the rebel ship that carries the Death Star plans all the way from from Rogue One to A New Hope.
 
2018-02-05 11:30:06 PM  

jaytkay: Hollie Maea: jaytkay:


They can't whip up some cheap but scientifically useful payload?

Not really, no.

Why not a nice camera? Or a reflector like Echo?


It's going out in the neighborhood of Mars. What is it going to reflect? How big a dish do you have to listen to a camera's signal? What are you photographing beyond the Moon?
 
2018-02-05 11:34:44 PM  

WelldeadLink: It's going out in the neighborhood of Mars. What is it going to reflect?


Signals from Earth

WelldeadLink: How big a dish do you have to listen to a camera's signal?


I don't know. Can't be too crazy if we're getting pics from Pluto already.

WelldeadLink: What are you photographing beyond the Moon?


Something interesting beyond the moon. That's crazy talk!!!

What could possible exist beyond the moon?
 
2018-02-05 11:43:34 PM  
My first car was a '64 Comet. It was a family hand-me-down; there are pictures of me at age five ish in the back seat, when it was purchased brand new by an uncle. I put quite a bit of work into it, by high school standards; souped it up a little and so on.

My current bottom of the line Korean import could take it in every measurable way.
 
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