If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WCPO Cincinnati)   The root cause of schools closing all over Northern Kentucky? A power plant working normally   ( wcpo.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Kentucky school districts, Precipitation, School bus, school bus routes, Meteorologist Jennifer Ketchmark, Greek loanwords, High school, School  
•       •       •

2423 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Feb 2018 at 8:20 AM (24 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-02-02 08:14:23 AM  
Think of the children.
*rolls eyes*
 
2018-02-02 08:26:54 AM  
Eh, I can see it.  There's a lot of really windy roads around there & being rural for a good portion of it, they don't get treated that well even with advance warning.  Having a bus full of kids slide off the road & roll down the hill into the 'holler' would be bad.

The day off probably would have been more appreciated by the parents if it was on Monday though.... "Sorry boss, can't make it in.  With this surprise snow I didn't have a sitter lined up.  I'm going to have to stay here & nurse my hangov... er .. watch my kids..."
 
2018-02-02 08:55:22 AM  
How did power plant cause school-canceling snow?

But who was phone?!!?
 
2018-02-02 08:56:14 AM  
Human's can't cause climate change, that's God's a-doin.
 
2018-02-02 09:20:19 AM  
Needing them to type up the milk with a rope, etc.
 
2018-02-02 09:26:38 AM  

WTFDYW: Think of the children.
*rolls eyes*


static01.nyt.comView Full Size


/on the bright side lots of candidates for the Fark modmin whiskey gopher  scholarship program
//many candidates
///treys and out
 
2018-02-02 10:43:11 AM  
Coal burning:  CO2
clean gas: most moisture per CO2
oh well
 
2018-02-02 10:49:35 AM  
It was probably what we in Syracuse call "nothing"
 
2018-02-02 10:58:56 AM  
Roll Coal
This is Lake effect snow
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-02-02 11:01:01 AM  

SwiftFox: Coal burning:  CO2
clean gas: most moisture per CO2
oh well


The difference being, moisture has a way of precipitating out of the air...as happened here.

But seriously, did the moisture from the power plants (I assume they were gas-burning if they were producing that much moisture) somehow trigger the precipitation of more moisture that was in clouds or whatever?  Or was all of the snow that fell actually formerly methane?
 
2018-02-02 12:11:01 PM  

flondrix: SwiftFox: Coal burning:  CO2
clean gas: most moisture per CO2
oh well

The difference being, moisture has a way of precipitating out of the air...as happened here.

But seriously, did the moisture from the power plants (I assume they were gas-burning if they were producing that much moisture) somehow trigger the precipitation of more moisture that was in clouds or whatever?  Or was all of the snow that fell actually formerly methane?


It had to have been just enough moisture to trigger the snowfall, with the majority of the snow being atmospheric moisture.
 
2018-02-02 04:00:12 PM  
X amount of moisture in the air == no snow
X+1 == snow

There is a tipping point and it was reached.
 
2018-02-02 06:40:47 PM  
That's okay.  All the coal mines will be back open any day now, and the kids won't need no more schoolin'.
 
2018-02-03 12:42:58 PM  

flondrix: SwiftFox: Coal burning:  CO2
clean gas: most moisture per CO2
oh well

The difference being, moisture has a way of precipitating out of the air...as happened here.

But seriously, did the moisture from the power plants (I assume they were gas-burning if they were producing that much moisture) somehow trigger the precipitation of more moisture that was in clouds or whatever?  Or was all of the snow that fell actually formerly methane?


I'm thinking that it's neither, the reporter obviously knows nothing about thermal power plants (ones that boil water to make steam usually coal or nuclear).  Thermal plants have cooling towers (to condense the turbine steam).  The cooling tower emissions are where the moisture came from.  Water emissions from cooling towers are lots more than out the stack.
 
2018-02-03 05:27:27 PM  

zeaper12: I'm thinking that it's neither, the reporter obviously knows nothing about thermal power plants (ones that boil water to make steam usually coal or nuclear). Thermal plants have cooling towers (to condense the turbine steam). The cooling tower emissions are where the moisture came from. Water emissions from cooling towers are lots more than out the stack.


And furthermore, gas burning, coal burning, trash burning, geothermal, and nuclear power plants would all generate about the same about of water vapor.  Only PV, wind, and hydro would be exempt.
 
Displayed 15 of 15 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report