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(The Local)   Record radiation levels found in Swedish boar. Radiation levels in borks off the charts   ( thelocal.se) divider line
    More: Scary, Domestic pig, wild boar, Pork, Venison, wild boar meat, Suidae, Razorback, Metaphysics  
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2767 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Jan 2018 at 9:37 PM (25 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-01-23 08:19:55 PM  
Mynd yöu, böar bytes can be pretti nästy...
 
2018-01-23 09:42:50 PM  
Was it a wild boar?

lh3.ggpht.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-23 09:43:09 PM  
Fools! This is how Godzilla got started!
 
2018-01-23 09:43:50 PM  
I am of the age where bork is both from the Muppets and the meme.

/You thought I was Swedish chef but am actually doggo
//bamborkled again
 
2018-01-23 09:50:50 PM  
Don't feed the yao guai.
 
2018-01-23 09:52:50 PM  
Oh boy the fearmongering.

Let's look at this rationally. Certain plants pick up certain elements from the soil naturally, and will concentrate radioisotopes as a side effect. The plants don't know that they're picking up radioisotopes, they just want the thing. Hence why tobacco is absolutely LOADED with alpha emitters (true fact, smokers blitz their lungs with alpha radiation).

So that's at work here. Mushrooms do the same thing, pigs like mushrooms, the bad stuff concentrates at the top of the food chain. Which, for the boars, might just be them, because boar are basically living tanks mated with a tractor.

So I found a rad calculator online because it's way too farking late for me to longhand any of this, and it should be noted that I couldn't use the exact isotope of Plutonium in play from Chernobyl (I chose Plutonium because it's the main isotope released that might be in play, having a half life over 30 years, but Cesium and Strontium are also possible).

Long story short, crunching the data of this "record level omg" to dose, we're left at...

0.000193 millirem an hour.

Background dose. Ish. Depending where you live.

Should you eat this boar? Probably not. The isotope the boar are collecting are NOT good for you and no good will happen to you by eating it, from both a toxic-chemical and internal radiation dose standpoint.

But these are not magical mutant death boar either.

/and now, I go to bed
 
2018-01-23 09:55:33 PM  

Ringshadow: But these are not magical mutant death boar either.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-23 09:56:55 PM  
Man, all he ever talks about is Vikings this, and Vikings that.
 
2018-01-23 09:59:24 PM  
Muppet Treasure Island - Swedish Chef [HD]
Youtube t-uVAH2GpuA
 
2018-01-23 10:02:40 PM  
LIke the sea life off the coast of some Brazilian beaches. The sand has a lot of thorium and uranium in it. If you lived on the beach for a year, you would get something like 180 mSv. The average you get in the US from natural sources is only 6 mSv.
 
2018-01-23 10:42:13 PM  
Fallout falls, pig eats fallout, you can't explain that.
 
2018-01-23 10:42:40 PM  
Ringshadow
So I found a rad calculator online because it's way too farking late for me to longhand any of this, and it should be noted that I couldn't use the exact isotope of Plutonium in play from Chernobyl (I chose Plutonium because it's the main isotope released that might be in play, having a half life over 30 years, but Cesium and Strontium are also possible).

Long story short, crunching the data of this "record level omg" to dose, we're left at...

0.000193 millirem an hour.

I get that number for 1cm and Plutonium.
But as far as European boars and what they eat are concerned, the main thing seems to be Cesium 137, which changes the value to ~3.5mR/hr if I enter 39700Bq and 1 cm distance.
But I've no idea what distance would make sense when it's about eating the source of the radiation; for example, if one were to use a millimeter instead of a centimeter, i.e. enter a tenth of the distance, the value would increase by a factor of 100.
 
2018-01-23 10:57:58 PM  
So. This boar had 39706 bq/kg.  Natural potassium has about 31 bq/g, or 31,000 bq/kg (that's about 2500 bananas worth of potassium/radiation)
 
2018-01-23 11:18:38 PM  
Same thing (approximately) in Austria with their wild boars.

Interesting that the elk are fine but the boars are radioactive... Since it seems as though man kind has almost been wiped out several times, maybe the Gews are on to something?

/I have no idea what that means
 
2018-01-23 11:37:53 PM  

Ringshadow: Oh boy the fearmongering.

Let's look at this rationally. Certain plants pick up certain elements from the soil naturally, and will concentrate radioisotopes as a side effect. The plants don't know that they're picking up radioisotopes, they just want the thing. Hence why tobacco is absolutely LOADED with alpha emitters (true fact, smokers blitz their lungs with alpha radiation).

So that's at work here. Mushrooms do the same thing, pigs like mushrooms, the bad stuff concentrates at the top of the food chain. Which, for the boars, might just be them, because boar are basically living tanks mated with a tractor.

So I found a rad calculator online because it's way too farking late for me to longhand any of this, and it should be noted that I couldn't use the exact isotope of Plutonium in play from Chernobyl (I chose Plutonium because it's the main isotope released that might be in play, having a half life over 30 years, but Cesium and Strontium are also possible).

Long story short, crunching the data of this "record level omg" to dose, we're left at...

0.000193 millirem an hour.

Background dose. Ish. Depending where you live.

Should you eat this boar? Probably not. The isotope the boar are collecting are NOT good for you and no good will happen to you by eating it, from both a toxic-chemical and internal radiation dose standpoint.

But these are not magical mutant death boar either.

/and now, I go to bed


You do know that tobacco is fertilized with cheap fertilizer which contains loads of radioactive isotopes, right?
 
2018-01-23 11:52:49 PM  

Ringshadow: Oh boy the fearmongering.

....So I found a rad calculator online...Long story short, crunching the data of this "record level omg" to dose, we're left at...

0.000193 millirem an hour.

Background dose. Ish. Depending where you live.


You're using the wrong calculator and you have in all likelihood underestimated the actual dose and the risk of it having an effect on an exposed person by a lot.

To evaluate the effect of food, you should use a calculator that accounts for the fact that the damage comes from the inside of the body -- that is, you should correctly count all particles, not just photons (for example, the alpha particles inside your body do 20x the damage of a gamma), you should account for the geometry of exposure, the affected organs and for fact that a portion of it will stay in your body for the rest of your life and continue to damage it. Regular exposure to meat with so much activity can increase the risks of stochastic effects significantly.

Long story short, in these matters it is wise to follow the advice of professional dosimetry experts.
 
2018-01-24 06:50:58 AM  

omegaic: This is a good sign. Wildlife recovery after a man-made environmental disaster is nice to see. Hopefully we can stop the coming climatepocalypse before it is too late.


They didn't recover. RTFA much?
 
2018-01-24 08:31:53 AM  

The Voice of Doom: seems to be Cesium 137, which changes the value to ~3.5mR/hr if I enter 39700Bq and 1 cm distance.


Fair enough. I went with Plutonium because we've hit one half-life for Cesium and Strontium, honestly, and I hadn't the foggiest what isotope the mushrooms went for.

Still a lot less dose than Ramsar, Iran deals with from natural alpha emitters, but not exactly ideal.

pup.socket: Long story short, in these matters it is wise to follow the advice of professional dosimetry experts.


Touche. I'm an industrial rad safety tech for rad waste, not health physics. I just tend to come into these threads and try to mitigate any irrational reactions, which tends to happen with anything nuclear.

This all said body burn is a fickle mistress. I might try to longhand math T-effective later, if I have time.

/if anything I guess these boar being a dose sponge isn't a bad thing
//trash the boar, remove the isotopes from the system
 
2018-01-24 09:49:41 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: Don't feed the yao guai.


Was really hoping Three Dog would make a cameo or something in FallOut 4, but it was not to be.
 
2018-01-24 02:57:09 PM  
But does this mean you can see the boar coming in the dark?
 
2018-01-25 12:51:45 AM  

Ringshadow: I just tend to come into these threads and try to mitigate any irrational reactions, which tends to happen with anything nuclear.


Using the wrong tools and getting an irrelevant "safe" result doesn't mitigate much. Discounting the risks and getting called out when the assumptions fail is the reason for the bad reputation of nuclear.

Ringshadow: might try to longhand math T-effective later


The correct procedure here is to just get the proper e(50) coefficients from the "Basic safety standards" and weight the ingested activity with them. Can't do it without knowing at least the nuclide mix, ingested amounts and age.

3-4k Bq per steak probably won't matter if you eat one or two during one hunting season, but it is way higher than the levels currently associated with statistically significant risk. Not eating a lot of this meat is a good idea and monitoring and collecting samples is warranted.
 
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