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(MLive.com)   Apparently meteorite collecting is a thing   ( mlive.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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1243 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Jan 2018 at 9:17 PM (26 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-01-18 07:12:45 PM  
Yeah, it's a thing.
meteorites are worth money. Sometimes big money. $1K a gram type money It depends on a lot of different factors.
Looking for them on a frozen lake or ice is common.. They stand out against the background or leave melt holes.
That is one reason why scientists go to Antarctica to look for them.

dry lake beds, non seasonal salt flats are good too. Anywhere there is a uncluttered high contrast.
 
2018-01-18 07:42:01 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 07:54:42 PM  
It would be my hobby for sure if I knew of anywhere around here to search for meteorites with any measure of success.
 
2018-01-18 08:06:51 PM  

blender61: Yeah, it's a thing.
meteorites are worth money. Sometimes big money. $1K a gram type money It depends on a lot of different factors.
Looking for them on a frozen lake or ice is common.. They stand out against the background or leave melt holes.
That is one reason why scientists go to Antarctica to look for them.

dry lake beds, non seasonal salt flats are good too. Anywhere there is a uncluttered high contrast.


I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.  So they attach a few very strong magnets on  a six foot long metal bar, magnetizing the entire thing.  Then they drag the bar behind their truck and  can cover acres pretty quickly.  Then they check the  bar for meteorites.  They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.
 
2018-01-18 08:13:26 PM  
Earguy:
I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.  So they attach a few very strong magnets on  a six foot long metal bar, magnetizing the entire thing.  Then they drag the bar behind their truck and  can cover acres pretty quickly.  Then they check the  bar for meteorites.  They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.

I wonder how many nails, screws, etc. they wind up with at the end of the day?
 
2018-01-18 08:16:18 PM  
You can collect micro meteorites in your gutters.
 
2018-01-18 08:16:44 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

$200...for a broken meteor? Mr. Verrill, you must be joking! l wouldn't give you two cents!
 
2018-01-18 08:34:35 PM  
Out of all the things people could collect, meteorites seem like they'd be in the upper quintile if least ridiculous.  There are still people out there with beanie babies, ferchristssake.
 
2018-01-18 09:01:10 PM  
A one pound meteorite is worth $1 million. Suck it, bitcoin miners.
 
2018-01-18 09:21:54 PM  
If I knew what I was doing or where I could do it, this would be an interesting hobby to take up.  Alas to me rocks look like rocks.
 
2018-01-18 09:23:25 PM  
I love Stardust
 
2018-01-18 09:23:53 PM  

sprgrss: If I knew what I was doing or where I could do it, this would be an interesting hobby to take up.  Alas to me rocks look like rocks.


Anywhere with rain if you have a microscope and free time
 
2018-01-18 09:27:56 PM  
Seriously? I think meteorite collecting started the day the first Neanderthal saw one hit close by.
 
2018-01-18 09:33:47 PM  
Amateurs. I collect meteors. That's MUCH harder.
 
2018-01-18 09:33:59 PM  
Almost (if not all) iron tools made in the bronze age came from meteorites.
 
2018-01-18 09:36:53 PM  

Earguy: They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.


The crystalline structure of the iron is also different from the stuff from earth. It's much more prominent.

/Saw a slice of meteorite in an astronomy class I took back about the time the earth cooled
 
2018-01-18 09:39:00 PM  

akula: Earguy: They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.

The crystalline structure of the iron is also different from the stuff from earth. It's much more prominent.

/Saw a slice of meteorite in an astronomy class I took back about the time the earth cooled


man...you are really old ;-)
 
2018-01-18 09:40:46 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 09:50:11 PM  
You lunkhead
 
2018-01-18 09:58:26 PM  

nekom: Earguy:
I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.  So they attach a few very strong magnets on  a six foot long metal bar, magnetizing the entire thing.  Then they drag the bar behind their truck and  can cover acres pretty quickly.  Then they check the  bar for meteorites.  They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.

I wonder how many nails, screws, etc. they wind up with at the end of the day?


That is the problem for amatuer metal detectors.  Meteorites have the same properties as rusty nails, old wire fencing, and just about everything else that's dusting underneath your feet.  So, if you want to find them, you need to know about where to look, and have a lot of patience for finding junk.
 
2018-01-18 10:02:30 PM  
images.fanpop.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 10:08:28 PM  

mr lawson: akula: Earguy: They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns.

The crystalline structure of the iron is also different from the stuff from earth. It's much more prominent.

/Saw a slice of meteorite in an astronomy class I took back about the time the earth cooled

man...you are really old ;-)


Sure as hell feels like it sometimes.
 
2018-01-18 10:08:43 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: [img.fark.net image 700x390]
$200...for a broken meteor? Mr. Verrill, you must be joking! l wouldn't give you two cents!


Yeah, if memory serves me, it doesn't end well.
 
2018-01-18 10:15:21 PM  

Earguy: I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.


Most meteorites are not iron. The ones people find tend to be, because those are the easiest to distinguish from regular rocks. But 80-90% of meteorites are stony and non-metallic. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cho​ndrit​e and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/​Iron_met​eorite
 
2018-01-18 10:18:51 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: [img.fark.net image 700x390]
$200...for a broken meteor? Mr. Verrill, you must be joking! l wouldn't give you two cents!



4.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 10:21:48 PM  

slackananda: [img.fark.net image 780x439]


Heh. Lots of Locnar on Fark lately. Outstanding.

And hell yes there are meteorite hunters. I think they had a show about it on NatGeo or Animal planet or something. Lots of money in it apparently.
 
2018-01-18 10:22:20 PM  
After a meteor disintegrates in the sky, somebody would NOT look for the pieces?
 
2018-01-18 10:25:12 PM  
s3.amazonaws.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 10:35:17 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Terry Pratchett may write a mean fantasy novel, but he also forges one heckuva sword. In honor of being knighted last year (Note: 2009), Sir Pratchett dug up 175 pounds of iron ore, sprinkled in some meteorites, and made himself a proper weapon.

Pratchett gathered the iron ore deposits himself from a field near his town, and worked with a friend who is an "expert on ancient metal-making techniques" to smelt it in a makeshift kiln in his own home. He then took it to a blacksmith, who made the blade.
 
2018-01-18 10:42:56 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Terry Pratchett


https://www.fark.com/comments/5633963/​As-if-he-wasnt-cool-enough-already-now​-we-learn-that-Terry-Pratchetts-first-​act-after-being-knighted-was-to-forge-​his-own-sword-Out-of-meteorites
 
2018-01-18 10:45:11 PM  
MST3K - Favorite Moments - Track of the Moon Beast
Youtube HNTQWVguEqE
 
2018-01-18 10:48:39 PM  
People collect everything...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-18 10:57:29 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [img.fark.net image 320x170]
Terry Pratchett may write a mean fantasy novel, but he also forges one heckuva sword. In honor of being knighted last year (Note: 2009), Sir Pratchett dug up 175 pounds of iron ore, sprinkled in some meteorites, and made himself a proper weapon.

Pratchett gathered the iron ore deposits himself from a field near his town, and worked with a friend who is an "expert on ancient metal-making techniques" to smelt it in a makeshift kiln in his own home. He then took it to a blacksmith, who made the blade.


Bathia_Mapes: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Terry Pratchett

https://www.fark.com/comments/5633963/​As-if-he-wasnt-cool-enough-already-now​-we-learn-that-Terry-Pratchetts-first-​act-after-being-knighted-was-to-forge-​his-own-sword-Out-of-meteorites


God I miss Pterry.
 
2018-01-18 10:59:29 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


Would like a word with Smits.
 
2018-01-18 11:05:11 PM  

JohnBigBootay: Seriously? I think meteorite collecting started the day the first Neanderthal saw one hit close by.


Vandal Savage?
 
2018-01-18 11:29:23 PM  

COMALite J: [images.fanpop.com image 720x480]


Found this the other day, a blacksmith actually forged Sokka's space sword with a fair amount of meteorite iron included:

Sokka's Meteor Sword (Avatar: The Last Airbender) - MAN AT ARMS
Youtube DITY1WzbLj8
 
2018-01-18 11:45:21 PM  

blender61: Yeah, it's a thing.
meteorites are worth money. Sometimes big money. $1K a gram type money It depends on a lot of different factors.
Looking for them on a frozen lake or ice is common.. They stand out against the background or leave melt holes.
That is one reason why scientists go to Antarctica to look for them.

dry lake beds, non seasonal salt flats are good too. Anywhere there is a uncluttered high contrast.


I went to the Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia and saw lots of black pebbles (a white salt floor the size of Belgium) and wondered if they were meteorites or whether they were just rocks windswept there. It does seem like the perfect place to find them. High contrast, non-melting and flat as far as the eye can see.
 
2018-01-19 12:14:28 AM  

JohnBigBootay: Seriously? I think meteorite collecting started the day the first Neanderthal saw one hit close by.


Some big dumb barbarian probably.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 12:56:52 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 01:05:04 AM  
Forget making a sword out of a meteorite, if you've got a big enough one you can make an anvil:
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 02:01:40 AM  

wildcardjack: People collect everything...

[img.fark.net image 425x431]


Funny, but unrealistic.

They're not really stuffed:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iceland​i​c_Phallological_Museum
 
2018-01-19 03:02:07 AM  
Meteorite Buddha totally-not-faked-for-Nazi-collectors​ chuckles karmically at your shenanigans.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 03:13:30 AM  
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 03:30:43 AM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


What's interesting about these "collectable" meteoric grain patterns is that they are the result of an extremely long (100k to million of years) gradual cooling of natural meteoric alloy through specific transition temperatures. As a result, these grain patterns are impossible to recreate artificially, making them incredibly rare and unique.
 
2018-01-19 06:50:04 AM  
Oh, subby, you poor ignorant thing!

Earguy:"I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.  So they attach a few very strong magnets on  a six foot long metal bar, magnetizing the entire thing.  Then they drag the bar behind their truck and  can cover acres pretty quickly.  Then they check the  bar for meteorites.  They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns."

Most meteorites are not iron but stone, and non-magnetic.  The hunters went after the low-hanging fruit for television purposes.

"Burns and melt patterns" do not distinguish terrestrial material from extraterrestrial.  The former is often melted and hurled threw the air as a result of the tektite's impact, resulting in very similar markings.  It takes very detailed chemical analysis to tell the difference.  Controversies still rage among experts about the origin of Moldavite, for instance. (It's entirely terrestrial in chemical composition, but crystal healers want it to be from the Pleiades so they have their experts, too.)
 
2018-01-19 07:39:57 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 03:09:05 PM  

Polish Hussar: COMALite J: [images.fanpop.com image 720×480]

Found this the other day, a blacksmith actually forged Sokka's space sword with a fair amount of meteorite iron included:

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/DITY1Wzb​Lj8]

Way cool!! Thanks for sharing!

Last Man on Earth: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: [img.fark.net image 320x170]
Terry Pratchett may've used to write a mean fantasy novel, but he also forgesd one heckuva sword. In honor of being knighted last year (Note: 2009), Sir Pratchett dug up 175 pounds of iron ore, sprinkled in some meteorites, and made himself a proper weapon.

Pratchett gathered the iron ore deposits himself from a field near his town, and worked with a friend who is an "expert on ancient metal-making techniques" to smelt it in a makeshift kiln in his own home. He then took it to a blacksmith, who made the blade.

Bathia_Mapes: Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Terry Pratchett
(Linkified relevant FARK thread link.)

God I miss Pterry.

Me too, but isn't it "pTerry"? And also way cool and thanks for sharing!
 
2018-01-19 05:55:14 PM  
Lotsa iron in this Meteor
momentcar.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-19 09:32:35 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: Oh, subby, you poor ignorant thing!

Earguy:"I saw a TV show about meteorite hunters.  Most meterorites are iron and therefore magnetic.  So they attach a few very strong magnets on  a six foot long metal bar, magnetizing the entire thing.  Then they drag the bar behind their truck and  can cover acres pretty quickly.  Then they check the  bar for meteorites.  They can identify  meteorites from terrestrial iron by the burns and melt patterns."

Most meteorites are not iron but stone, and non-magnetic.  The hunters went after the low-hanging fruit for television purposes.

"Burns and melt patterns" do not distinguish terrestrial material from extraterrestrial.  The former is often melted and hurled threw the air as a result of the tektite's impact, resulting in very similar markings.  It takes very detailed chemical analysis to tell the difference.  Controversies still rage among experts about the origin of Moldavite, for instance. (It's entirely terrestrial in chemical composition, but crystal healers want it to be from the Pleiades so they have their experts, too.)


Not subby, but I'll cop to being  ignorant about what you're talking about.  Interesting stuff.
 
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