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(Showbiz 411)   Looks like Ed's been Sheeran other people's work with himself   ( showbiz411.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, massive hit, Grammy Award winners, country superstar husband, wife Tim McGraw, authors Jerry Lieber, Sheeran, Ed Sheeran, Sheeran's song  
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2331 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 16 Jan 2018 at 5:44 AM (25 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-01-16 07:10:13 AM  
Wow, this is a trainwreck of an article that gets multiple song titles wrong. Ed Sheeran doesn't have a hit called "Thinking of You", nor does Sam Smith have a song called "Stand By Me", nor was John Mayer's song called "Waiting for the World to Change".
 
2018-01-16 07:34:39 AM  
Good artists borrow.

Great artists steal.

And then there's Ed Sheeran.
 
2018-01-16 08:55:55 AM  
Yeah but Ed Sheeram only has to steal 2 notes for a hit.
 
2018-01-16 09:11:37 AM  
Once again, the Todd Snider 'If Tomorrow Never Comes' story

Todd Snider If Tomorrow Never Comes
Youtube erdlUyllNhU
 
2018-01-16 09:49:46 AM  
So why why why does he have such a bad problem with plagiarism?

Because he has very little originality as a composer. which might be why so many people like his music; it all sounds very familiar.
 
2018-01-16 09:50:15 AM  
Ed Sheeran: Damp Hobbit

static.independent.co.ukView Full Size
 
2018-01-16 10:04:02 AM  
FTA: We all like Ed Sheeran.

I already disagree with the article.
 
2018-01-16 10:15:15 AM  
This is a bad precedent. When Ed is gone, if anything happens to Imagine Dragons radio stations around the country may just have to shut down!
 
2018-01-16 11:14:05 AM  
And he's not even the first to do this, the copycat.
 
2018-01-16 11:29:22 AM  
Worst headline of the year.
 
2018-01-16 11:47:38 AM  

mcmnky: Worst headline of the year.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-16 12:15:42 PM  
mcmnky: "Worst headline of the year."
img.fark.netView Full Size


obscure?
 
2018-01-16 12:28:48 PM  
I really liked "No Scrubs" by TLC, and I really don't like "Shape of You."  Because of this, I'm having a hard time hearing the similarities.  I know on the Sam Smith/Jeff Lynne/Tom Petty fiasco, someone wrote a cool story that showed the actual music that matched note for note.  I was hoping this story had a useful link, but then I remembered I'm on Fark.  It can't be useful or it might be news.
 
2018-01-16 12:41:47 PM  

cherryl taggart: I really liked "No Scrubs" by TLC, and I really don't like "Shape of You."  Because of this, I'm having a hard time hearing the similarities.  I know on the Sam Smith/Jeff Lynne/Tom Petty fiasco, someone wrote a cool story that showed the actual music that matched note for note.  I was hoping this story had a useful link, but then I remembered I'm on Fark.  It can't be useful or it might be news.


Ed Sheeran Admits That 'Shape Of You' Uses TLC's 'No Scrubs' Melody
Youtube 8OrT52ZToUk
 
2018-01-16 12:50:46 PM  

cherryl taggart: I really liked "No Scrubs" by TLC, and I really don't like "Shape of You."  Because of this, I'm having a hard time hearing the similarities.  I know on the Sam Smith/Jeff Lynne/Tom Petty fiasco, someone wrote a cool story that showed the actual music that matched note for note.  I was hoping this story had a useful link, but then I remembered I'm on Fark.  It can't be useful or it might be news.


It's definitely there.  Most people hear production first and musical elements second if at all.  People who are very into the art of music (not necessarily musicians or producers) can hear through production to the basis of a song-- things like chord progression, melody line, rhythm patters, etc.-- can detect these things more readily.

This is not to put down the average music listener, it just happens to be true of a good majority of people who listen to music, especially "casual" listeners.

As a songwriter/composer myself (as well as a producer) whenever I write something, I always have to check myself if I write something that sounds like I've heard it before.  I've got a pretty good memory but there's no way I can consciously remember 50+ years of listening to lots and lots of different kinds of music.  So I always have a few friends of various ages listen to something I've written, especially if it sounds familiar to me.  Has this song formed in my head or have I heard it (or elements of it) somewhere?  To me that's just due diligence.

That said (and at the risk of sounding older and grumpier than I actually am) so much of mainstream pop music is cut from the same finite number of templates, so I can see why this would be happening more and more.  It's no accident either.  There are services that can compare a song you've written to past hits and give you suggestions as to how to increase your chances of having a song that "sounds like a hit" out of the gates and therefore has (in theory) a better chance at getting a deal, published, etc.  These are not fly-by-night companies but serious services that even the major labels use to vet their artists' material.

Finally, if you're looking for originality, Ed Sheeran is the last person you should be listening to.
 
2018-01-16 01:40:42 PM  

DecemberNitro: Ed Sheeran: Damp Hobbit

[static.independent.co.uk image 850x638]


Awww, he's so cute! anyway, I LOVE his voice but dislike his music. I'd love to hear him do some of the Great American songbook stuff, like Rod Stewart had done, or anything acoustic.
 
2018-01-16 05:28:28 PM  

BlankReg: cherryl taggart: I really liked "No Scrubs" by TLC, and I really don't like "Shape of You."  Because of this, I'm having a hard time hearing the similarities.  I know on the Sam Smith/Jeff Lynne/Tom Petty fiasco, someone wrote a cool story that showed the actual music that matched note for note.  I was hoping this story had a useful link, but then I remembered I'm on Fark.  It can't be useful or it might be news.

It's definitely there.  Most people hear production first and musical elements second if at all.  People who are very into the art of music (not necessarily musicians or producers) can hear through production to the basis of a song-- things like chord progression, melody line, rhythm patters, etc.-- can detect these things more readily.

This is not to put down the average music listener, it just happens to be true of a good majority of people who listen to music, especially "casual" listeners.

As a songwriter/composer myself (as well as a producer) whenever I write something, I always have to check myself if I write something that sounds like I've heard it before.  I've got a pretty good memory but there's no way I can consciously remember 50+ years of listening to lots and lots of different kinds of music.  So I always have a few friends of various ages listen to something I've written, especially if it sounds familiar to me.  Has this song formed in my head or have I heard it (or elements of it) somewhere?  To me that's just due diligence.

That said (and at the risk of sounding older and grumpier than I actually am) so much of mainstream pop music is cut from the same finite number of templates, so I can see why this would be happening more and more.  It's no accident either.  There are services that can compare a song you've written to past hits and give you suggestions as to how to increase your chances of having a song that "sounds like a hit" out of the gates and therefore has (in theory) a better chance at getting a deal, published, etc.  These a ...


I really liked track three, "Adjusting My Onion" on your "Get Off My Lawn" LP!
 
2018-01-16 06:36:16 PM  
One-sentence fail.
 
2018-01-16 08:33:37 PM  
all-that-is-interesting.comView Full Size


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