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(Onion AV Club)   David Letterman's first new show in years is a serious, in-depth conversation on a dark, bare set. Sort of like Tom Synder's old show before he was replaced by Late Night   ( avclub.com) divider line
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1163 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 12 Jan 2018 at 9:54 PM (27 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-01-12 07:06:51 PM  
I hope Geoff is back. Insult Dog is funny.
 
2018-01-12 10:13:18 PM  
Watching it now. It has some pros/cons. Some of the back/forth is thoughtful but I agree with washington post in that there really wasn't an attempt to ask new questions/learn new thoughts from Obama.
 
2018-01-12 10:14:28 PM  
I'll fire up a colortini and watch the pictures as they fly through the air.

I miss TS. His goofy enthusiasm and often clueless naïveté were, well, I'll just come right out and say it, damn nice.
 
2018-01-12 10:15:52 PM  
Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.

Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.
 
2018-01-12 10:22:23 PM  
I also really recommend the Letterman epsiode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which is now on Netflix. I totally forgot about that show when it was on Crackle.
 
2018-01-12 10:27:07 PM  

Mad_Radhu: I also really recommend the Letterman epsiode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which is now on Netflix. I totally forgot about that show when it was on Crackle.


Watched that last night and agree with you.
 
2018-01-12 10:33:03 PM  

TheManofPA: Mad_Radhu: I also really recommend the Letterman epsiode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which is now on Netflix. I totally forgot about that show when it was on Crackle.

Watched that last night and agree with you.


The funniest part is getting Seinfeld in the Nissan leaf. I think Dave's the only one that could have done that. Jerry is a notorious car snob, and detests electric cars.
 
2018-01-12 10:50:12 PM  

TheManofPA: Mad_Radhu: I also really recommend the Letterman epsiode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which is now on Netflix. I totally forgot about that show when it was on Crackle.

Watched that last night and agree with you.


His interview on norm macdonalds podcast was good too.
 
2018-01-12 10:58:32 PM  
U2 on Tom Snider Show 06/04/1981
Youtube pHzy9dkyWGI


A nascent U2 on what I believe is their first US tour.....Edge cracks a nice joke which Tom clearly digs.
 
2018-01-12 10:59:55 PM  

TheManofPA: Mad_Radhu: I also really recommend the Letterman epsiode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which is now on Netflix. I totally forgot about that show when it was on Crackle.

Watched that last night and agree with you.


I love the back story on his Volvo.
 
2018-01-12 11:08:22 PM  
I'm just glad we continue to give these old rich white dudes a platform on which they can opine.
 
2018-01-12 11:17:09 PM  

Karma Chameleon: I'm just glad we continue to give these old rich white dudes a platform on which they can opine.


Express your racist hatred somewhere else jackass.
 
2018-01-12 11:21:50 PM  
Hey, maybe we'll get another Wendy O Williams moment.
 
2018-01-12 11:34:26 PM  

Courtney Cox-Zucker: Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.


Judging from his Norm McDonald interview, Dave's "retirement" from CBS doesn't sound as voluntary as we were led to believe.
 
2018-01-12 11:47:48 PM  
We didn't have cable in my house, so growing up throughout the 90s, my friday nights (and any other night that had a band playing I wanted to see I'd record...since late night) were always with letterman.  I think having that sense of humor  in front of me so much when i was 12, 13, and so on just embedded itself in me.

to me, he's entirely unique in his approach to late night comedy across what was "always there" from the 80s to his retirement.  Just that...dry wit.  He's a lot like norm in that he loved it best when he was in on the joke, and the viewers were, but the guest didn't get it.  Yes, he was mean to some people, but thats bound to happen over that long of a career.

More importantly, when he's on a subject where he's introspective and thoughtful, like the netflix piece I just watched, he's still the same dave.   but when he talks earnestly, when he came back after his heart surgery, or 9.11, basically any discussion framed around observation and something a little deeper... well I just appreciate that he puts that side out there, that he HAS that side.

Can you imagine jay leno, carson, or any of the current players being this way? Kimmel maybe.  but from him it seems more pandering to the audience. I think dave somehow managed to amalgamate the things that made others great in interviews (the humor of carson, the hard questions of snyder, and his own brand of sarcasm with a wink and a nod).
 
2018-01-13 12:13:19 AM  
I thought it was a great show. I enjoyed seeing "Smart" and "Presidential" instead of "Racist" and "The King Of Hush-Money". But Dave's beard is annoying.
 
2018-01-13 12:31:18 AM  

phedex: We didn't have cable in my house, so growing up throughout the 90s, my friday nights (and any other night that had a band playing I wanted to see I'd record...since late night) were always with letterman.  I think having that sense of humor  in front of me so much when i was 12, 13, and so on just embedded itself in me.

to me, he's entirely unique in his approach to late night comedy across what was "always there" from the 80s to his retirement.  Just that...dry wit.  He's a lot like norm in that he loved it best when he was in on the joke, and the viewers were, but the guest didn't get it.  Yes, he was mean to some people, but thats bound to happen over that long of a career.

More importantly, when he's on a subject where he's introspective and thoughtful, like the netflix piece I just watched, he's still the same dave.   but when he talks earnestly, when he came back after his heart surgery, or 9.11, basically any discussion framed around observation and something a little deeper... well I just appreciate that he puts that side out there, that he HAS that side.

Can you imagine jay leno, carson, or any of the current players being this way? Kimmel maybe.  but from him it seems more pandering to the audience. I think dave somehow managed to amalgamate the things that made others great in interviews (the humor of carson, the hard questions of snyder, and his own brand of sarcasm with a wink and a nod).


I think Colbert can be affecting as hell when he turns off his sarcastic persona and goes for earnest. He's my favorite of the current late night hosts.
 
2018-01-13 01:03:29 AM  

thatguyoverthere70: Courtney Cox-Zucker: Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.

Judging from his Norm McDonald interview, Dave's "retirement" from CBS doesn't sound as voluntary as we were led to believe.


Why?  I haven't listened to the podcast, but will.

Let's face it:  if Letterman's scandal had broken in late 2017, he would've been fired and probably never, ever seen on a show with Obama.
 
2018-01-13 01:09:28 AM  

Naido: Why?  I haven't listened to the podcast, but will.


Two or three times during the show, when Norm brought up the word "retirement", Dave would go into a "did I retire, or was I fired?" sort of routine. He kind of did it jokingly, but the way he repeated it made it feel like there was a kernel of truth. "Kidding on the square" I think Al Franken called it.
 
2018-01-13 02:36:18 AM  

TheManofPA: Watching it now. It has some pros/cons. Some of the back/forth is thoughtful but I agree with washington post in that there really wasn't an attempt to ask new questions/learn new thoughts from Obama.


I'll just go out on a limb and say Obama only agreed to the interview if Letterman did not utter the word "Trump."

That said, it's clear they both like each other and maybe it's nice they didn't really talk about politics much and just biatched about their kids.
 
2018-01-13 02:37:30 AM  

Courtney Cox-Zucker: Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.

Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.


Richard Simmons?
 
2018-01-13 02:41:53 AM  

Mad_Radhu: I think Colbert can be affecting as hell when he turns off his sarcastic persona and goes for earnest. He's my favorite of the current late night hosts.


I agree. Colbert had a rough start feeling things out, but he's settled into the role nicely.

However I've really come around on Kimmel too. I had enjoyed some of the stuff he'd done in the past but I thought he had difficulty shedding that bro'ey frat. it image (more his attitude rather than where he came from).  But he's been really good over the last year or so as well.
 
2018-01-13 02:45:43 AM  

thatguyoverthere70: Naido: Why?  I haven't listened to the podcast, but will.

Two or three times during the show, when Norm brought up the word "retirement", Dave would go into a "did I retire, or was I fired?" sort of routine. He kind of did it jokingly, but the way he repeated it made it feel like there was a kernel of truth. "Kidding on the square" I think Al Franken called it.


He did that during the Obama interview too. Obama later shot back something like "well we both lost our jobs, but I wasn't fired."
 
2018-01-13 06:43:26 AM  

phedex: More importantly, when he's on a subject where he's introspective and thoughtful, like the netflix piece I just watched, he's still the same dave.   but when he talks earnestly, when he came back after his heart surgery, or 9.11, basically any discussion framed around observation and something a little deeper... well I just appreciate that he puts that side out there, that he HAS that side.

Can you imagine jay leno, carson, or any of the current players being this way? Kimmel maybe.  but from him it seems more pandering to the audience. I think dave somehow managed to amalgamate the things that made others great in interviews (the humor of carson, the hard questions of snyder, and his own brand of sarcasm with a wink and a nod).


Tucker Carlson.
 
2018-01-13 06:47:21 AM  

Courtney Cox-Zucker: Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.


Greta Garbo.
 
2018-01-13 06:54:43 AM  

Courtney Cox-Zucker: Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.

Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.


Robert Blake
 
2018-01-13 11:54:00 AM  

Courtney Cox-Zucker: Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.

Don't get me wrong, I love me some Letterman. But I just want him to enjoy his retirement.


Rick Moranis definitely did.
 
2018-01-13 08:43:55 PM  

Alien Robot: Courtney Cox-Zucker: Can anyone name someone who retired from show business that actually retired from show business?

Johnny Carson is the only person that comes to mind.

Greta Garbo.


Cary Grant.
 
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