If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NYPost)   Er... Jeopardy contestant loses $3200 for the wrong pronunciation of 'gangsta'   ( nypost.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Alex Trebek, John Milton classic., host Alex Trebek, Roy Wood Jr., Oxford English Dictionary, Nick Spicher, John Milton, uncomfortable moments  
•       •       •

2375 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 03 Jan 2018 at 7:50 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



59 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-01-03 07:48:22 AM  
"It turns out that 'gangsta' and 'gangster' are both listed separately in the Oxford English Dictionary, each with its own unique definition," the post read. "Nick changed not only the song's title, but also its meaning - making his response unacceptable."

Damn, Trebek!  You gangsta..
 
2018-01-03 07:50:27 AM  
Did he pronounce it "gang-stay" as I do?

/hooked on phonics worked for me!
 
2018-01-03 07:53:36 AM  
What gangsta may look like
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 07:54:40 AM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 07:55:13 AM  
Looks like wrong pronounciashen...

..blew up in his face
 
2018-01-03 07:57:41 AM  
That song was almost as bad as the movie it was from.
 
2018-01-03 08:00:12 AM  
Hey Trebek, don't be vain and don't be whiny
Or else, my brother, I might have to get medieval on your heinie!
 
2018-01-03 08:08:32 AM  
But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.
 
2018-01-03 08:10:16 AM  
Did he pronounce it "Ah-mish"?
 
2018-01-03 08:27:27 AM  
I'm still laughing about the lady last night.
A: "The priests of Isreal came from this tribe."
Q: "Who are the Coens?"
 
2018-01-03 08:29:10 AM  
Raised a barn on Monday.  Soon I'll raise anutter.
 
2018-01-03 08:41:12 AM  
Like I tried to recover from a quiz bowl answer "the Yamamoto " instead of the Yamato with "are you making fun of my st st stutter?"
 
2018-01-03 08:50:40 AM  
Yet, if that was Final Jeopardy, they allow spelling mistakes, right? So at the end of the game it would been have a correct answer, but not in the middle?
 
2018-01-03 08:52:31 AM  
I much preferred the 50 Cent classic, "Wankster."
 
2018-01-03 09:14:00 AM  
Ohhh sorry. We were looking for "Pastime paradise." Pastime paradise, that's a real song that somebody wrote all the music and words to.
 
2018-01-03 09:14:31 AM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 09:15:42 AM  
Trebek, the underwear goes on the inside.
 
2018-01-03 09:16:54 AM  

idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.


So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?
 
2018-01-03 09:18:56 AM  
Too bad he wasn't Australian.

/They seem to pronounce any word that ends in 'er' as an 'a' and any word that ends in 'a' as an 'er'.
//parka -> parker          water -> wohda
 
2018-01-03 09:34:13 AM  

ThrillaManilla: I'm still laughing about the lady last night.
A: "The priests of Isreal came from this tribe."
Q: "Who are the Coens?"


"Cohen" is the Hebrew word for "priest."
 
2018-01-03 09:34:34 AM  
Sorry, it was the Moops
 
2018-01-03 09:41:22 AM  

Bslim: [i.imgur.com image 500x301]


So this is okay, but the thread about Hawhil Hawheaton has disappeared mysteriously?

:jenniferlawrence:
 
2018-01-03 09:48:20 AM  

Lucky LaRue: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x333]


Too bad he's gonna lose it all.
 
2018-01-03 09:53:14 AM  
Those hard r's.
 
2018-01-03 09:56:43 AM  

idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.


It isn't. They're different words. "Gangsta" is a subculture; "gangster" is an occupation. Al Capone was a gangster but not a gangsta; Coolio was a gangsta rapper but never a gangster.

They're pronounced the same way in some dialects; in others, they're pronounced differently. He chose a pronunciation that made it clear he intended "Gangster" over "Gangsta," meaning he got it wrong. It's not even sort-of-maybe-right. His answer, though understandable, was flatly wrong.

It can be annoying that Jeopardy is so persnickety over pronunciation and accuracy, but I've regularly seen Trebek refuse to grant credit over butchered versions of foreign terms without anyone getting bent out of shape, so I'm not really seeing this as anything new and surprising. And not just foreign languages, either: Trebek refused to credit a guy because he pronounced "Elaine" as "Eleen." He refused to credit the woman who pronounced "Tupac" as "Two-pack." He had to go back and remove credit from a guy who pronounced "Wimbledon" as "Wimbleton". It happens.

moothemagiccow: So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?


Nope. Because in his dialect, those words are pronounced identically.

Look at it like this: I'm a Midwesterner, and in my normal speech I say the two words "metal" and "medal" identically: both are homophones with "meddle." However, my wife is from the UK, and in her normal speech she pronounces them differently: "metal" is more like "meh-ull", while "medal" is more or less the way I see it.

If we were both on Jeopardy, and the question was "Michael Phelps has won more of these than anyone in Olympic history," suppose I were to answer "gold metals." I would, of course, be wrong -- but unless it was the Final Jeopardy question, I would get full credit, since it's not like they know  I wasn't thinking "medal."  But if my wife were to give the same answer, she would get no credit, as it would be clear from her pronunciation that she intended "metal" and not "medal."
 
2018-01-03 10:09:12 AM  

RogueWallEnthusiast: Too bad he wasn't Australian.

/They seem to pronounce any word that ends in 'er' as an 'a' and any word that ends in 'a' as an 'er'.
//parka -> parker          water -> wohda


That'll be a trick of the intrusive R, I think.

So basically, Australians (and most Brits, and a few Americans) drop their Rs if they appear after a vowel, unless those Rs appear between vowels. So they lose the R in "gimme some suga[r]," but keep it in "sugar and spice."

(The reason for keeping the R there is probably because the mouth doesn't like it when it has to form two different vowels and isn't allowed to blend them together.)

Anyway. It's very hard for the brain to keep track of which words "actually" have Rs in them when those Rs usually don't come into the picture. So many speakers of R-less English dialects have a habit of just chucking Rs in there whenever you've got two vowels in a row. So then you've got "I went to India," but then they might say "I went to Indiahr and Pakistan."

So when an Aussie says "water and Sprite," she might be likely to pronounce the R there, and in that case an American listener wouldn't even notice, because he expects it to be there. But when she says "wate[r] with ice," she'll drop the R, and the American is likely notice that.

Then again, when an Aussie says, "I can't find my parka," she won't put an R in, and the American listener wouldn't even notice, because he doesn't expect to hear an R there. But then she might say, "I've found my parka[r] and gloves," with that intrusive R, and the American is likely to notice that.
 
2018-01-03 10:20:38 AM  
It's spelled 'gangsta', but it's pronounced throatwobbler mangrove.
 
2018-01-03 10:20:45 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 10:33:37 AM  

pkjun: idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.

It isn't. They're different words. "Gangsta" is a subculture; "gangster" is an occupation. Al Capone was a gangster but not a gangsta; Coolio was a gangsta rapper but never a gangster.

moothemagiccow: So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?

Nope. Because in his dialect, those words are pronounced identically.


I appreciate your elaborate answer, but that's quite the double standard.  A black person wouldn't get penalized for the same mispronunciation as a white person?  Doesn't seem quite right.  As you said, they're two different words.  Same rules should apply to everyone.
 
2018-01-03 10:44:14 AM  

idrow: pkjun: idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.

It isn't. They're different words. "Gangsta" is a subculture; "gangster" is an occupation. Al Capone was a gangster but not a gangsta; Coolio was a gangsta rapper but never a gangster.

moothemagiccow: So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?

Nope. Because in his dialect, those words are pronounced identically.

I appreciate your elaborate answer, but that's quite the double standard.  A black person wouldn't get penalized for the same mispronunciation as a white person?  Doesn't seem quite right.  As you said, they're two different words.  Same rules should apply to everyone.


Bullshiat, if the black person said "Gangster" than I'm pretty sure they would be penalized.  If the guy had been from Boston, he wouldn't have had an issue "Gangstah"
 
2018-01-03 10:49:12 AM  
I can only imagine the hilarity that would ensue if a Scotsman with a thick accent would appear on Jeopardy. Oh wait... we've had that.
 
2018-01-03 10:49:17 AM  
What made it annoying was that it was one of those instances where a few minutes go by until the correction instead of catching it right away.  Honestly, it seems to be happening with more regularity, and if it's because Trebek makes the initial ruling, I'm wondering if it might be time for him to retire.
 
2018-01-03 10:59:43 AM  
So, she lost on Jeopardy. Baby

/woooooooo-hoo-hooooooooooo
 
2018-01-03 11:00:24 AM  
Dude was originally from Oregon so there's that. They also wouldn't let him say Ninkasi expression stout ...
 
2018-01-03 11:09:19 AM  
And yet twice now I've seen them accept the response of "What is Spinal Tap", when the complete title of the film is "This Is Spinal Tap".  And it was the title of the film they were going for, not just the name of the band.
 
2018-01-03 11:18:37 AM  
That is pretty much bullshiat.  Having to mimick somebody else's mispronunciation isn't necessary - meaning was conveyed and the answer was correct.  Hell you don't even need to answer with a person's first name most of the time on that show - "who is Adams" is usually just fine, not having to clarify if it was John or Samuel or JoeBob.
 
2018-01-03 11:30:29 AM  
I know somebody from NY who puts an 'r' after anything that ends in 'a'.  She's a woman, so she wears a brar
 
2018-01-03 11:40:10 AM  

cefm: That is pretty much bullshiat.  Having to mimick somebody else's mispronunciation isn't necessary


if it is a proper name and it's wrong, guess what?

like if the question was. what is My Guitar Wants To Kill Your Mama, and someone said mom. pretty simple.
 
2018-01-03 11:53:04 AM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: I know somebody from NY who puts an 'r' after anything that ends in 'a'.  She's a woman, so she wears a brar


Is that Brender? I work with her ex, Eddie.
 
2018-01-03 11:56:44 AM  

moothemagiccow: idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.

So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?


Coolio has weighed in on this situation, and he said the judges were technically correct.
And we all know what that means...
 
2018-01-03 12:06:14 PM  

give me doughnuts: ThrillaManilla: I'm still laughing about the lady last night.
A: "The priests of Isreal came from this tribe."
Q: "Who are the Coens?"

"Cohen" is the Hebrew word for "priest."


I got corrected the other day saying Mohel, I discovered that was a moil.
 
2018-01-03 12:08:52 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: I know somebody from NY who puts an 'r' after anything that ends in 'a'.  She's a woman, so she wears a brar


Just like her dear papar
 
2018-01-03 12:23:23 PM  
Too bad, cracka!
 
2018-01-03 12:31:43 PM  
Black Jeopardy with Tom Hanks - SNL
Youtube O7VaXlMvAvk
 
2018-01-03 12:39:40 PM  

idrow: pkjun: idrow: But that's how white people pronounce gangsta.  That should have been taken into consideration.

It isn't. They're different words. "Gangsta" is a subculture; "gangster" is an occupation. Al Capone was a gangster but not a gangsta; Coolio was a gangsta rapper but never a gangster.

moothemagiccow: So if Coolio was on the show and the question was "What is American Gangster?" Would they dock him points for not pronouncing the R?

Nope. Because in his dialect, those words are pronounced identically.

I appreciate your elaborate answer, but that's quite the double standard.  A black person wouldn't get penalized for the same mispronunciation as a white person?  Doesn't seem quite right.  As you said, they're two different words.  Same rules should apply to everyone.


No, a black person (speaking "black English") wouldn't make that mistake, because that isn't a mistake he or she could possibly make in his or her form of English. Neither would a British person. Neither would an Australian person. Neither would a person from eastern New England, or from parts of New York. Neither would a white person from many parts of the South.

They have two options: either to enforce some sort of standard pronunciation (say every word with the exact precision and clarity and enunciation of an NPR presenter, or you're out), or to simply record answers as they're given. The first is absurd -- anyone with a regional accent would be screwed. And so they apply the second rules to everyone: you get credit if you say the right word, and don't get credit if you say something other than the right word.

It's fair.
 
2018-01-03 12:40:25 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: I know somebody from NY who puts an 'r' after anything that ends in 'a'.  She's a woman, so she wears a brar


gotta get your car warshed, dontchaknow?
 
2018-01-03 12:46:50 PM  

cettin: idrow: I appreciate your elaborate answer, but that's quite the double standard.  A black person wouldn't get penalized for the same mispronunciation as a white person?  Doesn't seem quite right.  As you said, they're two different words.  Same rules should apply to everyone.

Bullshiat, if the black person said "Gangster" than I'm pretty sure they would be penalized.  If the guy had been from Boston, he wouldn't have had an issue "Gangstah"


Yes, exactly. And if the guy had been a white dude from pretty much anywhere in the Southeast, it would have been "Gangstuh."

It's not a racial thing; it's a dialect thing. Plenty of black people don't speak "black English." Plenty of white people drop their Rs. It's a quirky little coincidence that on Jeopardy one time a guy got one question wrong he would have gotten "right" if he had had a certain regional or ethnic dialect, but not really anything more.

And if you're arguing that dropping Rs somehow constitutes an unfair advantage for black people, well, I think your MAGA cap is probably on a bit too tight.
 
2018-01-03 12:49:06 PM  

cefm: That is pretty much bullshiat.  Having to mimick somebody else's mispronunciation isn't necessary - meaning was conveyed and the answer was correct.  Hell you don't even need to answer with a person's first name most of the time on that show - "who is Adams" is usually just fine, not having to clarify if it was John or Samuel or JoeBob.


As the show noted, it isn't a "mispronunciation."

When one word is pronounced and spelled differently from another word, when it has a different meaning from that other word, when they have different entries in the dictionary, and when they pick out different things in the world (e.g., Al Capone is not a gangsta and Coolio is not a gangster), they are simply different words.
 
2018-01-03 01:50:52 PM  

pkjun: cefm: That is pretty much bullshiat.  Having to mimick somebody else's mispronunciation isn't necessary - meaning was conveyed and the answer was correct.  Hell you don't even need to answer with a person's first name most of the time on that show - "who is Adams" is usually just fine, not having to clarify if it was John or Samuel or JoeBob.

As the show noted, it isn't a "mispronunciation."

When one word is pronounced and spelled differently from another word, when it has a different meaning from that other word, when they have different entries in the dictionary, and when they pick out different things in the world (e.g., Al Capone is not a gangsta and Coolio is not a gangster), they are simply different words.


I understand what you're saying. Yes, you are technically correct and the contestant was technically wrong.

But, the question wasn't about the difference between the two words Gangsta and Gangster, it was the name of the song. The contestant clearly knew the name of the song, but was penalized for not knowing the difference between Gangsta and Gangster, not for not knowing the name of the song.

If someone walks up to Coolio and says "I love your song 'Gangster's Paradise'", he most likely says "Thanks" and not "What are you talking about? I never wrote a song called 'Gangster's Paradise.' I'm truly confused as to what song you're referencing!"

If someone calls up a radio station and requests "Gangster's Paradise" by Coolio, the DJ doesn't say "There's no song by that name. That song doesn't exist" and hang up on the caller.

If you talk to a hundred people that are aware of Coolio's "Gangsta's Paradise" and you refer to the song as Coolio's "Gangster's Paradise", some of them might correct you, but not one of the one hundred will reply "Uh, what song are you talking about? There's no such song called 'Gangster's Paradise!'" Even though, yes, Coolio never recorded a song titled "Gangster's Paradise".

The contestant knew the name of the song. He didn't know the difference between Gangsta and Gangster, something I'd guess that more than half the people posting on this thread and Alex Trebek himself didn't know.

As a farker pointed out above, Jeopardy! has twice accepted "Spinal Tap" as the title of the movie that is technically titled "This Is Spinal Tap". It's because when someone asks the question "What's that comedy movie where Harry Shearer plays bass in a bad metal band?" and you answer "Spinal Tap" - you clearly know what movie is being referenced by the question. Just as if someone said to Harry Shearer "I loved you in that movie 'Spinal Tap', he probably replies "Thanks" and not "What movie are you talking about? I never made a movie called 'Spinal Tap.' There's never been a film with that title." Even though, yes, technically there is no movie called "Spinal Tap."
 
2018-01-03 01:58:10 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: I know somebody from NY who puts an 'r' after anything that ends in 'a'.  She's a woman, so she wears a brar


My mom started doing that a little over a decade ago. Drink soder. See a pander at the zoo. It's a telltale sign of a moron suddenly embarrassed by the non-rhoticity of her NY accent and trying to hide it to sound smart. Has the opposite effect.

Anyway, the ruling is stupid, I'm from Long Island originally and have the r-dropping thing going on so in my mind there is no difference between gangsta and gangster, it's an unstressed vowel "uh" at the end either way and it's a shame someone got penalized for thei dialect.
 
Displayed 50 of 59 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report