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(Twitter)   PSTTT, Hey Kid, do you like sushi? Do I got the thing for you It's the Fark's first 2018 Food thread ( not for the faint of heart)   ( twitter.com) divider line
    More: Weird, Copy link, December, Tweet, food trend, Nori, 1978, sushi croissant, 1971  
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397 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 02 Jan 2018 at 9:24 PM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-01-02 07:01:35 PM  
The fish is cooked and there's no rice. That's not sushi.
 
2018-01-02 07:34:22 PM  
I really hope subby doesn't pronounce it, "PSTTT."  They must have made such fun of you at the playground.
 
2018-01-02 08:38:36 PM  
Does the sushi include the upper or lower half of the mermaid/merman?
 
2018-01-02 08:53:52 PM  
Whoever created that abortion of a dish needs to be outed
 
2018-01-02 09:29:25 PM  
What?
Why?
How?
Who the hell would eat this?
 
2018-01-02 09:33:07 PM  
This is stupid.
 
2018-01-02 09:50:08 PM  
You know what's good? A smoked salmon bialy.

Macrina Bakery in SODO has them for brunch, and the store's usually not too crowded.
 
Ant
2018-01-02 10:04:44 PM  
I'd eat it, but it doesn't have sushi in it. Looks like a salmon croissant with nori inside
 
Ant
2018-01-02 10:08:29 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: You know what's good? A smoked salmon bialy.

Macrina Bakery in SODO has them for brunch, and the store's usually not too crowded.


Oooh. You're in Seattle too. I'm going to have to try that place.
 
2018-01-02 10:16:37 PM  

fusillade762: The fish is cooked and there's no rice. That's not sushi.


The rice thing is the most important part. If you have sushi rice, ANYTHING you put on it is sushi.
 
2018-01-02 10:25:50 PM  

BadReligion: fusillade762: The fish is cooked and there's no rice. That's not sushi.

The rice thing is the most important part. If you have sushi rice, ANYTHING you put on it is sushi.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 10:35:17 PM  
Is this some kind of French Jewish food? Looks tasty enough.
 
2018-01-02 10:46:56 PM  
CSB:
One year I made a huge corned beef (on sale CHEAP) in the crockpot one Christmas, but my brother is not a fan of corned beef. Also we went to a nearby buffet for Christmas dinner, as was our time-saving tradition, since it was just the two of us.

The closest store to our house was a Vietnamese market that carried sushi rice, wasabi, and seaweed wrap.

Anyway, the local brewery was open on Christmas, so I made some "sushi" with the corned beef. I had planned on getting some tuna from the market, but they were out. When I brought my plate out at the brewery, and people asked what exactly it was, I said, "Its, uhhhh...  Traditional Irish Christmas Sushi!" With that, a tradition was born. Few other people liked the idea, which inspired me to keep doing it.

I have played around with the "Traditional recipe" every time I made it for Thanksgiving or Christmas, so no set combo of ingredients. Typically, I go for a texture medley - cripsy alfalfa sprouts, crunchy carrot slivers, fluffy mushrooms, creamy avacado, hidden wasabi....

This is what my Irish Sushi looks like
I made it all by myself!
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 01:39:54 AM  
Oh FFS.

/probably be a huge hit
 
Ant
2018-01-03 10:44:06 AM  

Spice Must Flow: CSB:
One year I made a huge corned beef (on sale CHEAP) in the crockpot one Christmas, but my brother is not a fan of corned beef. Also we went to a nearby buffet for Christmas dinner, as was our time-saving tradition, since it was just the two of us.

The closest store to our house was a Vietnamese market that carried sushi rice, wasabi, and seaweed wrap.

Anyway, the local brewery was open on Christmas, so I made some "sushi" with the corned beef. I had planned on getting some tuna from the market, but they were out. When I brought my plate out at the brewery, and people asked what exactly it was, I said, "Its, uhhhh...  Traditional Irish Christmas Sushi!" With that, a tradition was born. Few other people liked the idea, which inspired me to keep doing it.

I have played around with the "Traditional recipe" every time I made it for Thanksgiving or Christmas, so no set combo of ingredients. Typically, I go for a texture medley - cripsy alfalfa sprouts, crunchy carrot slivers, fluffy mushrooms, creamy avacado, hidden wasabi....

This is what my Irish Sushi looks like
I made it all by myself!
[img.fark.net image 682x784]


I'd give it a try. Have you cooked the corned beef in dashi stock before? I wonder it that'd be any good.
 
2018-01-03 12:05:20 PM  
No, I said no
 
2018-01-03 02:21:34 PM  

WordsnCollision: BadReligion: fusillade762: The fish is cooked and there's no rice. That's not sushi.

The rice thing is the most important part. If you have sushi rice, ANYTHING you put on it is sushi.

[img.fark.net image 640x600]


This made me hungry
 
2018-01-03 04:28:43 PM  

Ant: Spice Must Flow: CSB:
One year I made a huge corned beef (on sale CHEAP) in the crockpot one Christmas, but my brother is not a fan of corned beef. Also we went to a nearby buffet for Christmas dinner, as was our time-saving tradition, since it was just the two of us.

The closest store to our house was a Vietnamese market that carried sushi rice, wasabi, and seaweed wrap.

Anyway, the local brewery was open on Christmas, so I made some "sushi" with the corned beef. I had planned on getting some tuna from the market, but they were out. When I brought my plate out at the brewery, and people asked what exactly it was, I said, "Its, uhhhh...  Traditional Irish Christmas Sushi!" With that, a tradition was born. Few other people liked the idea, which inspired me to keep doing it.

I have played around with the "Traditional recipe" every time I made it for Thanksgiving or Christmas, so no set combo of ingredients. Typically, I go for a texture medley - cripsy alfalfa sprouts, crunchy carrot slivers, fluffy mushrooms, creamy avacado, hidden wasabi....

This is what my Irish Sushi looks like
I made it all by myself!
[img.fark.net image 682x784]

I'd give it a try. Have you cooked the corned beef in dashi stock before? I wonder it that'd be any good.


Not familiar with dashi stock.

But the corned beef was relatively good in an Irish Sushi roll. Other things I tried, like seasoned hamburger, were less successful. However, that could be the combination of vegetables added.

I forgot to mention that the first time I tried this, I had just picked up a sushi rolling kit from the thrift store, brand new, and wanted to practice rolling sushi. It just happened at I had a lot of corned beef on hand. It wasn't really a thought-out experiment, and I knew I could eat the results without trouble. Somebody who was actually a chef could turn my feeble idea into something wonderful.
 
2018-01-03 04:42:00 PM  

Spice Must Flow: Ant: Spice Must Flow: CSB:
One year I made a huge corned beef (on sale CHEAP) in the crockpot one Christmas, but my brother is not a fan of corned beef. Also we went to a nearby buffet for Christmas dinner, as was our time-saving tradition, since it was just the two of us.

The closest store to our house was a Vietnamese market that carried sushi rice, wasabi, and seaweed wrap.

Anyway, the local brewery was open on Christmas, so I made some "sushi" with the corned beef. I had planned on getting some tuna from the market, but they were out. When I brought my plate out at the brewery, and people asked what exactly it was, I said, "Its, uhhhh...  Traditional Irish Christmas Sushi!" With that, a tradition was born. Few other people liked the idea, which inspired me to keep doing it.

I have played around with the "Traditional recipe" every time I made it for Thanksgiving or Christmas, so no set combo of ingredients. Typically, I go for a texture medley - cripsy alfalfa sprouts, crunchy carrot slivers, fluffy mushrooms, creamy avacado, hidden wasabi....

This is what my Irish Sushi looks like
I made it all by myself!
[img.fark.net image 682x784]

I'd give it a try. Have you cooked the corned beef in dashi stock before? I wonder it that'd be any good.

Not familiar with dashi stock.

But the corned beef was relatively good in an Irish Sushi roll. Other things I tried, like seasoned hamburger, were less successful. However, that could be the combination of vegetables added.

I forgot to mention that the first time I tried this, I had just picked up a sushi rolling kit from the thrift store, brand new, and wanted to practice rolling sushi. It just happened at I had a lot of corned beef on hand. It wasn't really a thought-out experiment, and I knew I could eat the results without trouble. Somebody who was actually a chef could turn my feeble idea into something wonderful.


I now want a Reuben sushi roll.
 
2018-01-03 07:58:55 PM  

McGrits: Spice Must Flow:  It wasn't really a thought-out experiment, and I knew I could eat the results without trouble. Somebody who was actually a chef could turn my feeble idea into something wonderful.

I now want a Reuben sushi roll.


How did I not think of that? Reubens are my favorite!

It just occurred to me:
Homemade sauerkraut uses salt, not vinegar, and takes about a week or two to complete the process using enzymes from the cabbage. But you can also eat the cabbage after just a day or two, before it goes all mushy and soggy. It's not like raw cabbage, but not quite like full-on sauerkraut, either; kind of like cole slaw. That would be the thing to make a Reuben roll out of, so it doesn't go soggy.

Thanks for the suggestion!
 
2018-01-03 08:39:56 PM  

Spice Must Flow: McGrits: Spice Must Flow:  It wasn't really a thought-out experiment, and I knew I could eat the results without trouble. Somebody who was actually a chef could turn my feeble idea into something wonderful.

I now want a Reuben sushi roll.

How did I not think of that? Reubens are my favorite!

It just occurred to me:
Homemade sauerkraut uses salt, not vinegar, and takes about a week or two to complete the process using enzymes from the cabbage. But you can also eat the cabbage after just a day or two, before it goes all mushy and soggy. It's not like raw cabbage, but not quite like full-on sauerkraut, either; kind of like cole slaw. That would be the thing to make a Reuben roll out of, so it doesn't go soggy.

Thanks for the suggestion!


No prob. Thinly slice the meat for easy bite, a lite amount of the Russian dressing plus your cabbage idea. Not sure about cheese but a shaved Swiss would complete the recipe. After you make the roll, coat the outside of the rice in toasted sesame seeds (mix with light and dark). Maybe even add caraway seeds if you can keep the amount down to not over power everything else.

I would definitely order this if I saw it on a menu.
 
2018-01-03 08:51:10 PM  

McGrits: Spice Must Flow: McGrits: Spice Must Flow:  It wasn't really a thought-out experiment, and I knew I could eat the results without trouble. Somebody who was actually a chef could turn my feeble idea into something wonderful.

I now want a Reuben sushi roll.

How did I not think of that? Reubens are my favorite!

It just occurred to me:
Homemade sauerkraut uses salt, not vinegar, and takes about a week or two to complete the process using enzymes from the cabbage. But you can also eat the cabbage after just a day or two, before it goes all mushy and soggy. It's not like raw cabbage, but not quite like full-on sauerkraut, either; kind of like cole slaw. That would be the thing to make a Reuben roll out of, so it doesn't go soggy.

Thanks for the suggestion!

No prob. Thinly slice the meat for easy bite, a lite amount of the Russian dressing plus your cabbage idea. Not sure about cheese but a shaved Swiss would complete the recipe. After you make the roll, coat the outside of the rice in toasted sesame seeds (mix with light and dark). Maybe even add caraway seeds if you can keep the amount down to not over power everything else.

I would definitely order this if I saw it on a menu.


Me too. Sounds delicious!
 
2018-01-03 09:18:03 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Macrina Bakery



$14.00? That's a bit much for a Polish bagel.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
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