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(The National Interest)   Jimmy Carter is America's top nuclear spy   ( nationalinterest.org) divider line
    More: Spiffy, United States Navy, Jimmy Carter, Submarine, Presidential Unit Citation, Jimmy Carter's, submarine USS Jimmy, Nuclear weapon, Jimmy Carter's mission  
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1983 clicks; posted to Politics » on 02 Jan 2018 at 6:40 PM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-01-02 11:20:29 AM  
Thanks for the TF, anonymoose person!

/or am i being punished?
//anyhow i just wanted to make a 'nuclear spy' fart joke
 
2018-01-02 12:57:39 PM  
AMERIC!!

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 01:06:27 PM  
FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.
 
2018-01-02 01:07:10 PM  

foo monkey: AMERIC!!

[img.fark.net image 425x283][View Full Size image _x_]


AMNOT!
 
2018-01-02 05:49:01 PM  
There's a Bangor in Washington? Huh.
 
2018-01-02 06:00:29 PM  

dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.


So you just invent an underwater splitter. You cut the line, install the splitter. The line is down for a few moments or even minutes, then its back up before anybody has a chance to go looking for a problem.
 
2018-01-02 06:43:55 PM  
Well, we spend enough goddamned money on the military, we better have something decent to show for it.
 
2018-01-02 06:44:55 PM  

foo monkey: AMERIC!!

[img.fark.net image 425x283]


FARK YEAH!
 
2018-01-02 06:45:24 PM  

jaylectricity: dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

So you just invent an underwater splitter. You cut the line, install the splitter. The line is down for a few moments or even minutes, then its back up before anybody has a chance to go looking for a problem.


Will the gorillas freeze to death at that depth?
 
2018-01-02 06:46:19 PM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 06:51:28 PM  
I'm ex-submarines. I was stationed in Bangor on the USS HM JACKSON. back then it was the USS Parche. The Jimmy Carter replaced the Parche. Every single member of the crew had to have Top Secret clearance. I only had Secret clearance. Also they would stay submerged for over 100 days are a time. I never did more than 52 days straight. The Parche and Jimmy Carter both have a lot of adaptations from the originals. Cool boats. Read the Wikipedia for some decent info on those.
 
2018-01-02 07:10:14 PM  
Officially, the Jimmy Carter belongs to the Navy, but it is for the exclusive use of the NSA. I was read in for one submarine program as part of their support team. Never rode one myself, but knew a lot of sailors sporting the Presidential Unit Citation ribbon. To a man, not one would speak of the mission they were on when they got it. If everyone keeps their mouths shut, the details of Mission 7 referred to in TFA will never see the light of day.
 
2018-01-02 07:10:28 PM  
If Putin wants to know he'll just Go to Jared.
 
2018-01-02 07:17:37 PM  

The5thElement: Officially, the Jimmy Carter belongs to the Navy, but it is for the exclusive use of the NSA. I was read in for one submarine program as part of their support team. Never rode one myself, but knew a lot of sailors sporting the Presidential Unit Citation ribbon. To a man, not one would speak of the mission they were on when they got it. If everyone keeps their mouths shut, the details of Mission 7 referred to in TFA will never see the light of day.


And they aren't political toadies, they're folks who take stuff like Oaths seriously.
 
2018-01-02 07:24:56 PM  
A lot of the right-winger I know laugh at a submarine named after Carter and think it's funny to say that it only has one speed forward and 4 in reverse. Nevermind that Carter was in the nuclear Navy and one of the only people to see a live nuclear core melting down.

They don't laugh after I explain that the Carter is probably the deadliest and most valuable intelligence asset we have.
 
2018-01-02 07:30:59 PM  

CthulhuCalling: A lot of the right-winger I know laugh at a submarine named after Carter and think it's funny to say that it only has one speed forward and 4 in reverse. Nevermind that Carter was in the nuclear Navy and one of the only people to see a live nuclear core melting down.

They don't laugh after I explain that the Carter is probably the deadliest and most valuable intelligence asset we have.


You beat me to it; he went into a nuclear reactor (round-robin, with a few others) and shut it down with hand tools:
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktiv​i​st/2015/08/27/that-time-jimmy-carter-w​alked-into-a-nuclear-reactor/
 
2018-01-02 07:33:29 PM  

jaylectricity: dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

So you just invent an underwater splitter. You cut the line, install the splitter. The line is down for a few moments or even minutes, then its back up before anybody has a chance to go looking for a problem.


Pretty much.  I can't imagine that underwater lines have the uptime to refuse to put anything insecure anything that dropped a single packet.  Then slap some crypto over it and hope that when someone in the loop with the key sells it, it will cost a bundle.
 
2018-01-02 07:43:39 PM  
I wonder if the crew has to wear sweaters and keep the thermostat turned way down.
 
2018-01-02 07:45:49 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
U.S.S. Donald J. Trump
 
2018-01-02 07:50:57 PM  

dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.


It's not impossible to tap fiber with training and equipment. Remember a few years ago when one of the major undersea cables heading out of Egypt went down, supposedly due to getting dragged by an anchor? It was down for days. Plenty of time to do a slice and dice.
 
2018-01-02 08:25:05 PM  

dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.


They also have amplifiers every so often
 
2018-01-02 08:50:58 PM  

CthulhuCalling: A lot of the right-winger I know laugh at a submarine named after Carter and think it's funny to say that it only has one speed forward and 4 in reverse. Nevermind that Carter was in the nuclear Navy and one of the only people to see a live nuclear core melting down.

They don't laugh after I explain that the Carter is probably the deadliest and most valuable intelligence asset we have.


Shiat, it's a perfect name for a vessel engaged in skulduggery. Adversaries won't take it seriously.

I await its joint missions with HMS Neville Chamberlain.
 
2018-01-02 08:54:01 PM  

SwiftFox: dittybopper: FTFA:
More importantly, the hourglass-shaped section might allow specially trained teams to find and tap undersea communications lines and plant listening devices on the ocean floor. It's more than likely that the submarine is one of the Pentagon's most stealthy spies.

It's getting harder and harder to do that now that copper wire is being replaced by fiber optics.

With copper, you're working with electricity (and magnetism), and an inductive tap placed on the cable can suck up all the information going over it without interfering with the operation of the cable one whit.

With fiber optics, you can't do that.  You have to access the light somehow, which means you have to scrape away the covering, and bend the fiber optic cable enough for some light to leak.

That means you're physically altering the cable, and you're also altering how it transmits somewhat (because a bit less signal will make it to the other end), and that makes it much more easy to detect than a break-away inductive tap on copper cabling.

Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

They also have amplifiers every so often


Yep, even with long wave lasers and SM media, you have to regenerate the signal eventually. Wouldn't be surprised if they're installing gear to keep the signal level the same something when they splice the cable and install the splitters.
 
2018-01-02 08:56:52 PM  
Top secret mission. Grumpf lost two dozen Titleists and he wants them found. He also needs greens fees for every sailor onboard.
 
2018-01-02 09:05:03 PM  

dittybopper: Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.


Honestly, it's not that hard these days to encrypt everything that goes down a long distance cable.

Hell, encrypting your entire network was NBD 20 years ago. Kerberos and similar stuff have been around for a good long time.

Those line taps described in Blind Man's Bluff was really only useful because way back then the cables were simple analog voice circuits.

Russia's recent poking around near large international undersea cables probably is an effort to rig up remotely controlled charges so they can cut off a great deal of communication with our allies in case shiat ever got real.

Perhaps it's the same deal with the Carter. They're just rigging charges on Russian undersea cables.

Or they could be doing something entirely different and far more interesting.

Or maybe not. It's entirely possible the Carter is just going out to sea to run drills and stand ready if our leaders in Washington decide to have them blow up some stuff with their cruise or antiship missiles.
 
2018-01-02 09:16:04 PM  

Riche: dittybopper: Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

Honestly, it's not that hard these days to encrypt everything that goes down a long distance cable.

Hell, encrypting your entire network was NBD 20 years ago. Kerberos and similar stuff have been around for a good long time.

Those line taps described in Blind Man's Bluff was really only useful because way back then the cables were simple analog voice circuits.

Russia's recent poking around near large international undersea cables probably is an effort to rig up remotely controlled charges so they can cut off a great deal of communication with our allies in case shiat ever got real.

Perhaps it's the same deal with the Carter. They're just rigging charges on Russian undersea cables.

Or they could be doing something entirely different and far more interesting.

Or maybe not. It's entirely possible the Carter is just going out to sea to run drills and stand ready if our leaders in Washington decide to have them blow up some stuff with their cruise or antiship missiles.

They don't usually award Presidential Unit Citations for routine patrols.
 
2018-01-02 09:36:23 PM  

Scanty Em: Top secret mission. Grumpf lost two dozen Titleists and he wants them found. He also needs greens fees for every sailor onboard.


Found?  Do you have any idea how many strokes penalty 24 balls would be?  Those suckers are going to Challenger Deep so that even the Woods Hole guys can't find them.
 
2018-01-02 09:56:18 PM  
What good is a super secret spy submarine when we are being destroyed slowly from the inside by power hungry rich farks and Republicans.
 
2018-01-02 10:01:03 PM  
s3.amazonaws.comView Full Size

Here is the Carter flying the Jolly Roger.  Cool huh?  In the Sub world, that means a mission "kill".  So she got dirty with an enemy of the US, and came out on top.  I hear it's not her first time flying that flag.
Kill what?  I have my theories, but I'll keep them to myself, like the heroes on the Carter do.

Article here: http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/why​-​was-the-uss-jimmy-carter-flying-the-jo​lly-roger/article/2634466
 
2018-01-02 10:05:31 PM  
My brother knew a sailor from the Parche.  All the sailors on the boat h\Had a huge list of awards that were basically:
Awarded for meritorious service for CLASSIFIED activities.  Row after row of awards without any details other than the award.  People doing secret work often have a hard time getting jobs outside the silent service.
I interviewed a guy that worked in the NSA for a decade.  I asked if I could ask about his work there.  He said I could not.  It's hard to interview a senior lead when they can't about anything they've lead in the last decade.

/Hired him anyway.
 
2018-01-02 11:26:51 PM  
'Jimmy Carter Says 'Yes'' by Gene Marshall
Youtube h874BPSnbWc
 
2018-01-02 11:42:17 PM  

Gyrony: [img.fark.net image 401x320]U.S.S. Donald J. Trump


Fake news! I can tell 'cause it's floating!
 
2018-01-03 04:49:26 AM  

Jeff5: Riche: dittybopper: Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

Honestly, it's not that hard these days to encrypt everything that goes down a long distance cable.

Hell, encrypting your entire network was NBD 20 years ago. Kerberos and similar stuff have been around for a good long time.

Those line taps described in Blind Man's Bluff was really only useful because way back then the cables were simple analog voice circuits.

Russia's recent poking around near large international undersea cables probably is an effort to rig up remotely controlled charges so they can cut off a great deal of communication with our allies in case shiat ever got real.

Perhaps it's the same deal with the Carter. They're just rigging charges on Russian undersea cables.

Or they could be doing something entirely different and far more interesting.

Or maybe not. It's entirely possible the Carter is just going out to sea to run drills and stand ready if our leaders in Washington decide to have them blow up some stuff with their cruise or antiship missiles.
They don't usually award Presidential Unit Citations for routine patrols.


I don't disagree with you, but i wouldn't put it past the US, to spend billions on building a high tech spy boat and then give it lots of awards and citations for "excellent classified work" they've accomplished for routine patrols and training missions just to keep other countries on their toes and guessing WTF the ship is doing. Sometimes seeing how your enemy reacts when they think you're doing something sneaky is just as powerful a move as actually being sneaky.
 
2018-01-03 02:59:52 PM  

keldaria: Jeff5: Riche: dittybopper: Honestly, if I were a military relying on undersea fiber optic cables, I'd be constantly monitoring them for such an intrusion.

Honestly, it's not that hard these days to encrypt everything that goes down a long distance cable.

Hell, encrypting your entire network was NBD 20 years ago. Kerberos and similar stuff have been around for a good long time.

Those line taps described in Blind Man's Bluff was really only useful because way back then the cables were simple analog voice circuits.

Russia's recent poking around near large international undersea cables probably is an effort to rig up remotely controlled charges so they can cut off a great deal of communication with our allies in case shiat ever got real.

Perhaps it's the same deal with the Carter. They're just rigging charges on Russian undersea cables.

Or they could be doing something entirely different and far more interesting.

Or maybe not. It's entirely possible the Carter is just going out to sea to run drills and stand ready if our leaders in Washington decide to have them blow up some stuff with their cruise or antiship missiles.
They don't usually award Presidential Unit Citations for routine patrols.

I don't disagree with you, but i wouldn't put it past the US, to spend billions on building a high tech spy boat and then give it lots of awards and citations for "excellent classified work" they've accomplished for routine patrols and training missions just to keep other countries on their toes and guessing WTF the ship is doing. Sometimes seeing how your enemy reacts when they think you're doing something sneaky is just as powerful a move as actually being sneaky.


That summed up my response nicely.
 
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