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(Engadget)   Reset the clock. Not that clock, the original one from Pacific Rim   ( engadget.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, deepest recorded point, Northwestern Polytechnical University, South China Morning, Mariana Trench, Earth, ambient sea noise, deepest parts, deep sea creatures  
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9382 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jan 2018 at 12:11 PM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-01-02 08:46:44 AM  
How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward
 
2018-01-02 08:49:41 AM  
i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 08:56:36 AM  
Whales humping.
 
2018-01-02 08:59:32 AM  
James Cameron did it first

i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:15:11 PM  

plecos: Whales humping.


Magma displacement.
 
2018-01-02 12:15:57 PM  

rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:17:03 PM  
The Challenger Deep, where even BLUE HADES fears to tread.
 
2018-01-02 12:17:06 PM  

Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.


So...illicit whale humping. "No honey, that was just magma displacement..."
 
2018-01-02 12:18:52 PM  

Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:19:22 PM  

This text is now purple: rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward

[img.fark.net image 850x553]


She went to the shipbreakers in 2015, IIRC.
 
2018-01-02 12:19:28 PM  
If you drop an acoustic probe, does it make a sound?
 
2018-01-02 12:19:36 PM  

rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward


According to the press release, it's a "10Km-long acoustic probe" so it's presumably tethered. I can't image the probe itself would be that long, that would be ridiculous.
 
2018-01-02 12:20:05 PM  

Hack Patooey: Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.

[img.fark.net image 299x168][View Full Size image _x_]


Pavarooooooooooti
 
2018-01-02 12:21:55 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:23:01 PM  

plecos: Whales humping.


Down Periscope Whale mating calls
Youtube OEpEv6kWdtw
 
2018-01-02 12:23:08 PM  
If it's something you reset, it's not a clock, per se, it's a timer or a stopwatch.
 
2018-01-02 12:23:11 PM  

FrancoFile: Hack Patooey: Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.

[img.fark.net image 299x168][View Full Size image _x_]

Pavarooooooooooti


Look, this is my story, okay?
 
2018-01-02 12:23:55 PM  
...and China also recently found dinosaur eggs, a bunch of dust they reshaped into statues to increase tourisim, and a bunch of islands they now deem are theirs....

How are the Berlitz Cantonese CD's? I for one welcome our new planet owning Chinese landlords.
 
2018-01-02 12:24:02 PM  
KNEW THIS WAS
ONE WAY TICKET
BUT YOU KNOW
I HAD TO COME
 
2018-01-02 12:24:40 PM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size



SHUT UP, MEG!
 
2018-01-02 12:25:30 PM  

This text is now purple: rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward

[img.fark.net image 850x553][View Full Size image _x_]


Yes, we've done deep sea salvage before going back to the Glomar Explorer, which is the ship you are posting of an image of, but here we are talking about little devices that are nearly 7 miles below which is over twice the depth of the Glomar's mission objective. That's a hell of a feat even if they stay perfectly in place... who's to say how the currents operate down there?

I'm not saying this is impossible, but there's got to be some serious tech at play here to make this mission even possible, and sadly the article offers no clue
 
2018-01-02 12:25:52 PM  

maxandgrinch: ...and China also recently found dinosaur eggs, a bunch of dust they reshaped into statues to increase tourisim, and a bunch of islands they now deem are theirs....

How are the Berlitz Cantonese CD's? I for one welcome our new planet owning Chinese landlords.


You probably want to splurge and get the Mandarin ones instead.  Unless you are interested in ordering food at your local Chinese restaurant.  Then go Canto.
 
2018-01-02 12:32:10 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:35:54 PM  

swamp_of_dumb: The Challenger Deep, where even BLUE HADES fears to tread.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:39:12 PM  
So one could say this was a Pacific Rim job?
 
2018-01-02 12:40:25 PM  

rcain: This text is now purple: rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward

[img.fark.net image 850x553][View Full Size image _x_]

Yes, we've done deep sea salvage before going back to the Glomar Explorer, which is the ship you are posting of an image of, but here we are talking about little devices that are nearly 7 miles below which is over twice the depth of the Glomar's mission objective. That's a hell of a feat even if they stay perfectly in place... who's to say how the currents operate down there?

I'm not saying this is impossible, but there's got to be some serious tech at play here to make this mission even possible, and sadly the article offers no clue


Finding them is easy peasy.

First of all, it could be something as simple as having a long cable and a buoy.

But let's assume not, lets assume they have to go down with an ROV and get them.  You build a simple pinger in each one that responds when it hears a certain sound signal.  You send the ping, count the time between when you sent the signal and hear the response, and you then know your distance to the device pretty accurately.  Speed of sound in the Marianas Trench should be about (whips out slide rule)....    1,646-ish meters per second.  You have to divide the time for the response by half, so if it takes half a second to get a response, the device is (.5/2)*1646 = ~412 meters away.  If the response takes 3 seconds to reach you, it's (3/2)*1646 = ~2,470 meters away.

The "ping and response" goes on while you successively get closer.  If you start getting longer times, you need to back up and change direction.

It's not brain science or rocket surgery, at least conceptually.
 
2018-01-02 12:42:15 PM  

Hack Patooey: Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.

[img.fark.net image 299x168][View Full Size image _x_]


mapage.noos.frView Full Size


Noob.
 
2018-01-02 12:43:14 PM  
kpbs.media.clients.ellingtoncms.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:44:31 PM  
Did you see it? They said it was hauled from the Challenger Deep, but I'm positive that beast never swam in terrestrial waters until a week ago. There's a tranquilizer gun in the shark cage, but I'm not sure it would work on this species. You're welcome to try.
 
2018-01-02 12:45:09 PM  
lovecraftianscience.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:49:55 PM  

dittybopper: It's not brain science or rocket surgery, at least conceptually.


Actually, by doing that at 3 different places, you'll have a series of 3 different distance spheres, and where they all intersect is where the device is.

And if you kept to a certain depth, really all you have to do is draw circles, like this:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 12:50:24 PM  
Someone launch Buckman out of a torpedo tube.
 
2018-01-02 12:50:45 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 01:02:00 PM  

dittybopper: rcain: This text is now purple: rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward

[img.fark.net image 850x553][View Full Size image _x_]

Yes, we've done deep sea salvage before going back to the Glomar Explorer, which is the ship you are posting of an image of, but here we are talking about little devices that are nearly 7 miles below which is over twice the depth of the Glomar's mission objective. That's a hell of a feat even if they stay perfectly in place... who's to say how the currents operate down there?

I'm not saying this is impossible, but there's got to be some serious tech at play here to make this mission even possible, and sadly the article offers no clue

Finding them is easy peasy.

First of all, it could be something as simple as having a long cable and a buoy.

But let's assume not, lets assume they have to go down with an ROV and get them.  You build a simple pinger in each one that responds when it hears a certain sound signal.  You send the ping, count the time between when you sent the signal and hear the response, and you then know your distance to the device pretty accurately.  Speed of sound in the Marianas Trench should be about (whips out slide rule)....    1,646-ish meters per second.  You have to divide the time for the response by half, so if it takes half a second to get a response, the device is (.5/2)*1646 = ~412 meters away.  If the response takes 3 seconds to reach you, it's (3/2)*1646 = ~2,470 meters away.

The "ping and response" goes on while you successively get closer.  ...


That's not what I was getting at, sonar is old tech. Doing my own digging I think I found the tech Chinese are using to retrieve these devices, definitely unmanned and also autonomous, but can be remotely controlled from the surface as needed. Still not sure how they intend on keeping the devices in place and locating, but that is an easier problem to solve. Could be as simple as an anchoring mechanism and/or beacon set to start on a timer

FYI, the pressure and forces exerted on craft at that depth are astounding, and it's no slight feat to develop equipment capable of operating at those depths. So it is a bit worrying to see people think that such tech is so simple or "easy". It shows just how common place we presently view advanced tech and how we take it for granted, having forgotten the reality of these challenges and difficulty and cost in developing them. It does place us in peril of losing these advances in the face of future calamity
 
2018-01-02 01:10:06 PM  

tarheel07: [img.fark.net image 309x174]


Now I wish there was an award for GIFs. I would want this one to win best supporting actor or something.
 
2018-01-02 01:18:56 PM  
So, an echo...
 
2018-01-02 01:36:29 PM  
I am sure that there are several apocalyptic focused YouTube channels that will discuss this news calmly and rationally.....
 
2018-01-02 01:42:06 PM  
Did a kaiju just commit a mass shooting?
 
2018-01-02 01:56:09 PM  

rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward


I think you may have not considered the much more likely method of lowering the transducer down with a long wire (and perhaps attaching it to a marker float if you want to leave it there a while).
 
2018-01-02 01:58:43 PM  

anuran: [kpbs.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com image 850x579][View Full Size image _x_]


Which one farted?

/Best un-deleted movie blooper ever.
 
2018-01-02 02:06:33 PM  

Arkanaut: Did a kaiju just commit a mass shooting?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiJyl​M​yfu9I
 
2018-01-02 02:09:14 PM  

rcain: How the hell are they retrieving these things? Especially the ones that will be laying around down there for a year. The article glosses over it like it's no big deal but, if they have submersible drones capable of hitting those depths and doing retrieval, that's a huge bit of tech. Even bigger if it's a manned submersible. AFAIK, the US has no such tech. Best we've done so far is sent a manned submersible down then right back up again. Being able to do operations at that depth is a major step forward


We could've done it decades ago, except for Senator Trent Lott.

That GOP asshole made our oceanographers accept a research vessel one of his low-rent contributors dropped during construction...and that's not the most anti-science thing that asshole did.
 
2018-01-02 02:09:52 PM  

Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.


That's my pick up line.
 
2018-01-02 02:24:41 PM  

rcain: FYI, the pressure and forces exerted on craft at that depth are astounding


I'm well aware of it.  Heck, I had to factor that into my calculations on how fast sound travels at that depth.  For every kilometer of depth, you have to add 17 m/s.

Also, I'm cognizant of the fact that time is fleeting.
 
2018-01-02 03:28:04 PM  

dittybopper: rcain: FYI, the pressure and forces exerted on craft at that depth are astounding

I'm well aware of it.  Heck, I had to factor that into my calculations on how fast sound travels at that depth.  For every kilometer of depth, you have to add 17 m/s.

Also, I'm cognizant of the fact that time is fleeting.


Madness takes its toll.
cdn.alivenetwork.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 03:40:29 PM  

dittybopper: dittybopper: It's not brain science or rocket surgery, at least conceptually.

Actually, by doing that at 3 different places, you'll have a series of 3 different distance spheres, and where they all intersect is where the device is.

And if you kept to a certain depth, really all you have to do is draw circles, like this:

[img.fark.net image 850x465][View Full Size image _x_]


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 04:05:00 PM  
When I saw the pic in TFA, I was most interested to see the deep-diving research sub China has built. I googled the picture, and it's clipart showing a tourist boat in Barbados.

Thanks a lot, Engadget.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 05:31:20 PM  
The Bloop: A Mysterious Sound from the Deep Ocean | NOAA SOSUS
Youtube OBN56wL35IQ
 
2018-01-02 05:32:21 PM  

Albert911emt: plecos: Whales humping.

Magma displacement.


The Old Ones.
 
2018-01-02 07:05:16 PM  

WelldeadLink: If you drop an acoustic probe, does it make a sound?


yes. one ping only.
 
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