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(Adweek)   Marketers beware: your attempts to motivate and inspire social media influencers via swag won't work in 2018. This isn't 2014, they're on to your tricks. Try thought leadership or proactivity   ( adweek.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Marketing, Pillar No., influencers, consistent transparency, social transparency issues-marketers, third-party technology provider, social influencers, holiday shopping season  
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955 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 Dec 2017 at 7:39 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-12-30 03:35:06 AM  
I've never actually heard any of Patton Oswalt's comedy but going by these I really should.

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2017-12-30 07:17:57 AM  
I figured that out ages ago. I used to be instructed to farm a site where bloggers and "influencers" advertised what they'd be writing about and you could submit products and they'd, ostensibly, write about your product and give you a link that would drive tons of traffic to your site. I kept saying, "these links are worthless, the people are just getting free stuff" - one who barely even bothered to slip in a photo of something and misspelled the company name actually hit me up the following year to be in a "gift guide" again (but I had already, finally convinced them of the futility of the approach. Nothing about this surprises me.

And Patton Oswalt is awesome, and he is hilarious as the voice of an animated unicorn that follows Chris Meloni around on "Happy!" which is oddly, on Sci-Fi channel oddly, because it's a quality, entertaining show I go out of my way to watch).  And now I sound like I am trying to be an "influencer" myself, ironically, but pretty much everything the guy has done is good, and his Twitter is one of the few I consider worth a read, because he's one of those comedians who is funny because he's so smart.
 
2017-12-30 07:49:46 AM  

serpent_sky: I figured that out ages ago. I used to be instructed to farm a site where bloggers and "influencers" advertised what they'd be writing about and you could submit products and they'd, ostensibly, write about your product and give you a link that would drive tons of traffic to your site. I kept saying, "these links are worthless, the people are just getting free stuff" - one who barely even bothered to slip in a photo of something and misspelled the company name actually hit me up the following year to be in a "gift guide" again (but I had already, finally convinced them of the futility of the approach. Nothing about this surprises me.

And Patton Oswalt is awesome, and he is hilarious as the voice of an animated unicorn that follows Chris Meloni around on "Happy!" which is oddly, on Sci-Fi channel oddly, because it's a quality, entertaining show I go out of my way to watch).  And now I sound like I am trying to be an "influencer" myself, ironically, but pretty much everything the guy has done is good, and his Twitter is one of the few I consider worth a read, because he's one of those comedians who is funny because he's so smart.


He's also awesome on the MST3K revival.
 
2017-12-30 07:58:52 AM  
Thought Leadership is the name of my Devo tribute band.

/Commas, people!
//They're free.
///They don't bite.
 
2017-12-30 09:04:04 AM  
You know, I shouldn't be surprised that a site called 'adweek' can't load properly on a browser armed with ad-busting plugins.  Oh well.
 
2017-12-30 09:54:23 AM  
Oh it's not all that bad. I wrote about one company's jacket that could have literally killed me on a ski tour. (Breathability issues causing sweat to condense inside the jacket for potential hypothermia). They acknowledged it, changed that jacket, and sent out the new version for a follow up review. The death jacket review is still on the site though.

/csb
//mmmmm...wet jackets
///slashthreeeees
 
2017-12-30 10:01:40 AM  
What a meaningless load of corporate-speak word salad. The fact that social media "influencers" even exist, and these marketing dipsh*ts believe they influence anything, makes me think that Bill Hicks was onto something.
 
2017-12-30 10:08:23 AM  
I truly cannot understand how consumers assign any value to companies that promise "a portion of the proceeds goes to some charity!" If a company sincerely wants to support some cause, they just give, no strings attached. I wouldn't even get so whiny if they advertised the support they've given - and suggested the smart, cool people who like their product should consider giving directly too. But tying it to my purchase, or retweet, or test drive or whatever (often with a cap) makes it offensive to me in so many ways.And I think Patton is great too, but I don't mind an entertainer who does some shilling. A lot of entertainment is directly tied to advertising - nonpremium tv, sports live or broadcast. Very few are able to make a living entirely independently, and even many who can are making other creative compromises and decisions based on cold, real-world business factors.
 
2017-12-30 11:47:43 AM  

gunsmack: What a meaningless load of corporate-speak word salad. The fact that social media "influencers" even exist, and these marketing dipsh*ts believe they influence anything, makes me think that Bill Hicks was onto something.


I see a lot of jobs that want your personal Facebook (I use it to stay in touch with out of town friends, basically, so no... not your business what I do on my own time) or Twitter (no, you are not accessing the politicians I follow - way too easy to bias you against me) and Instagram (I only have an account to follow wrestlers, so no, it conveys nothing) to gauge your "influence."  Read my farking resume that outlines results via those old things called copywriting skills and look at my portfolio of work, and stay out of my private life, which will not become your company's personal proving grounds.

But no, it's easy to fall back on a person's "influence" and the young kids buy into this. There are a lot of predatory agencies that sell this bullshiat to people. They all want a quick fix, when the rules of the game with Google and SEO and such change every few weeks, and refuse to go with what I call "old faithful" - honest, quality copy that isn't keyword loaded and worried about the latest Google rules - because they keep changing them to make it harder for the people looking for a quick fix. If you, and your site, are quality, and so is (are) your product(s), you won't have to worry about this "new trick" someone told you about in a meeting that was actually a sales pitch for them to employ some software to sell the "new trick solution".

But that just seems too difficult and too much of an investment when some eager kid will post links on Facebook all day (and you can't understand why people don't "like" the pages and links enough) and refuse to accept that emailing people every single day is the #1 path to unsubscribing, because at the end of the day, you are a company, not a best friend, and never will be the customer's pal, so engage less and make it count when you do.  It's not rocket science, but it is difficult to convince clients and companies of the old "less is more" and "quality matters" principles, because they're not quick tricks that
give you a mild bump in metrics that evens out over time and eventually has to be redone when you learn about a change or another quick fix.

Back in the day, my boss was desperate for Digg  links and they loved that spike in traffic if they managed it, even though I warned it was not an effective long-term strategy to try to get links and be click baity about it, but they had us intentionally trying to provoke people with our writing to do just that. The site ultimately failed and I started writing ringtone SEO copy and then it was eBooks and clicky sites that linked to the book (you know, the "just click here for the solution to all of life's problems!" sort of sites) and then the company failed.

I'm not the world's best copywriter, or the world's best marketer - nobody is. But it was so much easier when people weren't always employing tricks and stopgaps and fixes, or following the trends, back when the internet was a fairly new tool for marketing and it was left up to the creative team to make it work.
 
2017-12-30 12:35:37 PM  

serpent_sky: If you, and your site, are quality, and so is (are) your product(s), you won't have to worry about this "new trick" someone told you about in a meeting that was actually a sales pitch for them to employ some software to sell the "new trick solution".


Preach it.
 
2017-12-30 03:35:12 PM  

gunsmack: What a meaningless load of corporate-speak word salad. The fact that social media "influencers" even exist, and these marketing dipsh*ts believe they influence anything, makes me think that Bill Hicks was onto something.


A. Bill Hicks is/was correct.
B. The sad fact is that these influencers exist and marketing people spend a lot of time and money trying to harness their reach.
C. The ridiculous nature of marketing is why CMOs are paid so much and at the same time only have an average 18 month tenure in the Fortune 500. Either your campaign sells billions and you go on to write a book and consult for huge fees or it tanks and you're out of a job
 
2017-12-30 03:40:19 PM  

serpent_sky: gunsmack: What a meaningless load of corporate-speak word salad. The fact that social media "influencers" even exist, and these marketing dipsh*ts believe they influence anything, makes me think that Bill Hicks was onto something.

I see a lot of jobs that want your personal Facebook (I use it to stay in touch with out of town friends, basically, so no... not your business what I do on my own time) or Twitter (no, you are not accessing the politicians I follow - way too easy to bias you against me) and Instagram (I only have an account to follow wrestlers, so no, it conveys nothing) to gauge your "influence."  Read my farking resume that outlines results via those old things called copywriting skills and look at my portfolio of work, and stay out of my private life, which will not become your company's personal proving grounds.

But no, it's easy to fall back on a person's "influence" and the young kids buy into this. There are a lot of predatory agencies that sell this bullshiat to people. They all want a quick fix, when the rules of the game with Google and SEO and such change every few weeks, and refuse to go with what I call "old faithful" - honest, quality copy that isn't keyword loaded and worried about the latest Google rules - because they keep changing them to make it harder for the people looking for a quick fix. If you, and your site, are quality, and so is (are) your product(s), you won't have to worry about this "new trick" someone told you about in a meeting that was actually a sales pitch for them to employ some software to sell the "new trick solution".

But that just seems too difficult and too much of an investment when some eager kid will post links on Facebook all day (and you can't understand why people don't "like" the pages and links enough) and refuse to accept that emailing people every single day is the #1 path to unsubscribing, because at the end of the day, you are a company, not a best friend, and never will be the customer's pal, so engage less and make it count when you do.  It's not rocket science, but it is difficult to convince clients and companies of the old "less is more" and "quality matters" principles, because they're not quick tricks that
give you a mild bump in metrics that evens out over time and eventually has to be redone when you learn about a change or another quick fix.

Back in the day, my boss was desperate for Digg  links and they loved that spike in traffic if they managed it, even though I warned it was not an effective long-term strategy to try to get links and be click baity about it, but they had us intentionally trying to provoke people with our writing to do just that. The site ultimately failed and I started writing ringtone SEO copy and then it was eBooks and clicky sites that linked to the book (you know, the "just click here for the solution to all of life's problems!" sort of sites) and then the company failed.

I'm not the world's best copywriter, or the world's best marketer - nobody is. But it was so much easier when people weren't always employing tricks and stopgaps and fixes, or following the trends, back when the internet was a fairly new tool for marketing and it was left up to the creative team to make it work.


I would have loved writing ads for Craftsman tools during Sears heyday.  That would have been awesome
 
2017-12-30 10:45:49 PM  
Knows something about proactivity...

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2017-12-30 10:45:53 PM  
I write up my thoughts on woodworking tools, and companies occasionally send me freebies or offer exceptional discount codes. I have been told that my reviews have generated a lot of traffic, and enough net new sales to justify sending me goodies.

Win/win. I get stuff I would buy but I pay by putting up my opinion and posting pics instead of opening my wallet. Companies get a bump in sales driven to them
 
2017-12-31 08:16:47 AM  

serpent_sky: gunsmack: ...But it was so much easier when people weren't always employing tricks and stopgaps and fixes, or following the trends, back when the internet was a fairly new tool for marketing and it was left up to the creative team to make it work.


Well, here is your problem. Those creative people knew nothing of the underlying technology, came up with the proto-bait for other, less creative people to copy paste and generally bastardize. It's how we arrived at the mess of today. People with minimal skill and even less will to learn doing 'creative' work to satisfy corporate greed. Not to be out-done, they empowered their 'influencers' with emoji set and a free lobotomy before posting. TaDa, 'creative' people have now killed the internet.

It used to be possible to read a well thought out, researched and technologically worded reviews online. Then we got 'creative'... And now we have slide show news-cicles that mine pretend-coin in the background. Sure gave Amazon a boost. I'd much rather buy, test myself and return than read some sponsored lies online.

Want to fix this mess? Quit with swag, begging for likes and start using a thesaurus to write. Provide links to equations/science when used, and use it abundantly throughout your work. In short, we have scientific method for a reason; when you tell me you did A, provide repeatable steps so I too can too do A. Otherwise you are writing a personal journal page on how you interacted with the world.

/Just my 2c
//Hates boobtoob videos on how to 'fix' stuff
///There is a better way with text and diagrams
 
2017-12-31 08:20:52 AM  

outtatowner: serpent_sky: gunsmack: ...But it was so much easier when people weren't always employing tricks and stopgaps and fixes, or following the trends, back when the internet was a fairly new tool for marketing and it was left up to the creative team to make it work.

Well, here is your problem. Those creative people knew nothing of the underlying technology, came up with the proto-bait for other, less creative people to copy paste and generally bastardize. It's how we arrived at the mess of today. People with minimal skill and even less will to learn doing 'creative' work to satisfy corporate greed. Not to be out-done, they empowered their 'influencers' with emoji set and a free lobotomy before posting. TaDa, 'creative' people have now killed the internet.

It used to be possible to read a well thought out, researched and technologically worded reviews online. Then we got 'creative'... And now we have slide show news-cicles that mine pretend-coin in the background. Sure gave Amazon a boost. I'd much rather buy, test myself and return than read some sponsored lies online.

Want to fix this mess? Quit with swag, begging for likes and start using a thesaurus to write. Provide links to equations/science when used, and use it abundantly throughout your work. In short, we have scientific method for a reason; when you tell me you did A, provide repeatable steps so I too can too do A. Otherwise you are writing a personal journal page on how you interacted with the world.

/Just my 2c
//Hates boobtoob videos on how to 'fix' stuff
///There is a better way with text and diagrams


Let me ax you somethin:  How much you willin' to pay for these well thought out, researched and technologically worded reviews online?
 
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