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(Marketwatch)   (3^3-√((13-(-5))/2))/6 steps to conquering your fear of math   ( marketwatch.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, math phobia, Scientific method, Quantitative research, Quantitative marketing research, Qualitative research, Statistical survey, Social sciences, Mathematics  
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1355 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Dec 2017 at 5:20 PM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-12-28 03:10:00 PM  
26.5 steps?
BOMDAS
 
2017-12-28 03:17:48 PM  
There are FOUR lights!!
 
2017-12-28 03:24:14 PM  
42
 
2017-12-28 03:34:48 PM  
I got 4 or 5. Square roots have two values, subby.
Granted I did it pretty quick in my head so who knows.
 
2017-12-28 03:38:02 PM  
I think I ended up with "1"....

I was actually good at the maths at one time in my life.
 
2017-12-28 03:40:02 PM  
That's easy. (3^3-√((13-(-5))/2))/6  =  2e^(2*sqrt(-1)*pi) + 0! * 2
Duh.
 
2017-12-28 03:49:07 PM  

NateAsbestos: Square roots have two values, subby


No they don't. While there are indeed two roots, the radical symbol always gives the non-zero root, by definition.
 
2017-12-28 03:59:10 PM  

revrendjim: NateAsbestos: Square roots have two values, subby

No they don't. While there are indeed two roots, the radical symbol always gives the non-zero root, by definition.


I call shenanigans.
Besides, both roots are non-zero (unless we're rooting zero)
 
2017-12-28 03:59:18 PM  

revrendjim: NateAsbestos: Square roots have two values, subby

No they don't.While there are indeed two roots, the radical symbol always gives the non-zero positive root, by definition.


FTFY
 
2017-12-28 04:03:23 PM  
I was told there would be no math...
 
2017-12-28 04:42:49 PM  

AintNoAmoeba: 26.5 steps?
BOMDAS


I'm absolutely positive that extra brackets have now been added to that complex equation since my primary post to make it work. It is normal, natural and rational to not believe me but these are not imaginary memories.
 
2017-12-28 04:49:07 PM  
Parentheses first, start with the innermost, and work outwards:

(13-(-5)) = 18
(18/2) = 9
(3^3-sqrt(9)) = 27 - 3, because exponents come before subtraction.

No multiplication or division in this parentheses so addtion/subtraction is next:

(27-3) = 24

All parentheses are done, leaving 24/6

No exponents left, so multiplication/division is next:

24/6 = 4

Done.
 
2017-12-28 04:53:04 PM  

NateAsbestos: revrendjim: NateAsbestos: Square roots have two values, subby

No they don't. While there are indeed two roots, the radical symbol always gives the non-zero root, by definition.

I call shenanigans.
Besides, both roots are non-zero (unless we're rooting zero)


Dammit I meant non-negative
 
2017-12-28 04:58:34 PM  
So, read TFA.... not really feeling it. Her approach boils down to: "get by on what you already know until you get stuck then hire a tutor to help you out, unless somebody at work will do it" and is pretty much the "Gwenyth Paltrow" approach to problem-solving. She's not wrong, but that's only a plausible answer for a small minority of people.

*obligatory plug for your local community college, etc., here*

That said, my housemate was also steered away from STEM because she was a girl, and gets a case of the raging what-ifs when she's drunk. So, hey, fark the patriarchy.
 
2017-12-28 05:09:28 PM  
I went to college.
 
2017-12-28 05:26:07 PM  
math is hard, let's work as shop assistants!
 
2017-12-28 05:44:12 PM  
media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2017-12-28 05:44:13 PM  

Mugato: I went to college.


Me too, that's where all the women were.
I did not attend.
 
2017-12-28 05:51:03 PM  

NateAsbestos: Mugato: I went to college.

Me too, that's where all the women were.
I did not attend.


Probably for the best. I took all three calculous courses, differential equations, linear algebra, number theory and probably a lot others and I have no idea what to do with them.
 
2017-12-28 05:57:12 PM  

King Something: 42


But what's the question?
The question is, "What is 6 x 8?"
But the answer to that is 48!
And that's the problem (with the universe).
 
2017-12-28 05:59:06 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-28 05:59:36 PM  

revrendjim: NateAsbestos: revrendjim: NateAsbestos: Square roots have two values, subby

No they don't. While there are indeed two roots, the radical symbol always gives the non-zero root, by definition.

I call shenanigans.
Besides, both roots are non-zero (unless we're rooting zero)

Dammit I meant non-negative


Which is also wrong.
 
2017-12-28 06:05:49 PM  
"Gots to have your maths in this world."

Squierrly Dan, Letterkenny
 
2017-12-28 06:10:28 PM  

nmrsnr: Parentheses first, start with the innermost, and work outwards:

(13-(-5)) = 18
(18/2) = 9
(3^3-sqrt(9)) = 27 - 3, because exponents come before subtraction.

No multiplication or division in this parentheses so addtion/subtraction is next:

(27-3) = 24

All parentheses are done, leaving 24/6

No exponents left, so multiplication/division is next:

24/6 = 4

Done.


I got 10/10 on that problem for putting down '7' and taping a $20 on top.

\TA graders are poor
 
2017-12-28 06:13:59 PM  

Mugato: NateAsbestos: Mugato: I went to college.

Me too, that's where all the women were.
I did not attend.

Probably for the best. I took all three calculous courses, differential equations, linear algebra, number theory and probably a lot others and I have no idea what to do with them.


I was kidding, I also took way more math than I will ever need. I actually liked it... Linear Algebra should be taught way sooner in the curriculum than it is, IMO. It's just addition/multiplication, those are literally the only two operators you need, and it's some neat, powerful stuff.

But, yeah, co-eds.
 
2017-12-28 06:24:52 PM  
My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.
 
2017-12-28 06:38:43 PM  

Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.


My problem with this statement is that none of those things are necessarily enforced by an authority. Sometimes it's just really hard to do stuff without following a very careful, rigid procedure.

For example, making lenses to correct a kid's nearsightedness is really exacting, there are precise rules that need to be followed, you have to do it the exact same way twice, or else that kid's not gonna be able to see. Does it mean you're a "tool of authority" if you succeed in correcting his vision, even if you figured out how to do it yourself?
 
2017-12-28 06:53:07 PM  

snowjack: Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.

My problem with this statement is that none of those things are necessarily enforced by an authority. Sometimes it's just really hard to do stuff without following a very careful, rigid procedure.

For example, making lenses to correct a kid's nearsightedness is really exacting, there are precise rules that need to be followed, you have to do it the exact same way twice, or else that kid's not gonna be able to see. Does it mean you're a "tool of authority" if you succeed in correcting his vision, even if you figured out how to do it yourself?


Well the tool for the tool to make the tool is you, so....yes?
 
2017-12-28 06:58:39 PM  
A headline like that mess ain't gonna help my fear of math, subby.
 
2017-12-28 07:01:38 PM  

hammer85: snowjack: Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.

My problem with this statement is that none of those things are necessarily enforced by an authority. Sometimes it's just really hard to do stuff without following a very careful, rigid procedure.

For example, making lenses to correct a kid's nearsightedness is really exacting, there are precise rules that need to be followed, you have to do it the exact same way twice, or else that kid's not gonna be able to see. Does it mean you're a "tool of authority" if you succeed in correcting his vision, even if you figured out how to do it yourself?

Well the tool for the tool to make the tool is you, so....yes?


What authority figure made me follow the rigid rules and procedures?

My point is, there's way way more to math than doing what your math teacher says. If all someone got out of math classes was that it's an exercise in following authority, then I think that's a tragedy.
 
2017-12-28 07:24:53 PM  

Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.


you know about the universe right?
 
2017-12-28 07:29:17 PM  

snowjack: What authority figure made me follow the rigid rules and procedures?

My point is, there's way way more to math than doing what your math teacher says. If all someone got out of math classes was that it's an exercise in following authority, then I think that's a tragedy.


I concur - What I got out of it was... methodologies in exercising logic.

I went up to my second year (eight quarters) of Uni Calculus just because I felt it to be interesting, to be honest, and it is one of the few classes that I use in my everyday life with astounding regularity.
 
2017-12-28 07:30:46 PM  
5. Get examples of math that are relevant... WHY should you care about linear algebra? Because it can help you with figuring discounts, totals, etc.

My Discrete Math teacher excelled at this. My HS teachers... sucked at it. My forme thesis advisor rocks and is pointing me towards non-linear regression analysis classes because I have things I want to figure out that aren't described linear-ly.

Math can be fascinating or mind numbingly boring, depending on the approach.
 
2017-12-28 07:33:44 PM  
2^2((√(6*(1+1/4+1/9+...+1/n^2)))/π)
 
2017-12-28 07:39:18 PM  

Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.


Being on Fark requires you to follow rules. Living in modern society requires you to follow rules. The entire farking Universe is based upon many chemical processes and the laws of physics that cannot be violated in any way, shape, or form. You can't get any more rigid than that.
So how are you not going to follow the rules again?
 
2017-12-28 08:02:52 PM  
FARK: putting the ASS in PEMDAS since 1998.
 
2017-12-28 09:39:37 PM  
This is why I pay someone to math for me
 
2017-12-28 11:21:19 PM  

bobug: 5. Get examples of math that are relevant... WHY should you care about linear algebra? Because it can help you with figuring discounts, totals, etc.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-29 12:46:50 AM  

nmrsnr: Parentheses first, start with the innermost, and work outwards:

(13-(-5)) = 18
(18/2) = 9
(3^3-sqrt(9)) = 27 - 3, because exponents come before subtraction.

No multiplication or division in this parentheses so addtion/subtraction is next:

(27-3) = 24

All parentheses are done, leaving 24/6

No exponents left, so multiplication/division is next:

24/6 = 4

Done.


You are in error.  You farked up your brackets.
(3^3-√((13-(-5))/2))/6
(9-√((13-(-5))/2))/6
(9-√((18)/2))/6
(9-√(9))/6
(9-3)/6
6/6
1

If it makes it easier, copy/paste that into a program with bracket highlighting like Notepad++.  Then choose most any programming language to better color the brackets and numbers.
 
2017-12-29 01:20:44 AM  
(3^3-3)/6
3^0/6
1/6.

Or

(3^3-3)/6
(27-3)/6
24/6=4 as shown ^^
 
2017-12-29 01:38:37 AM  

bk3k: You are in error.  You farked up your brackets.
(3^3-√((13-(-5))/2))/6
(9-√((13-(-5))/2))/6
(9-√((18)/2))/6
(9-√(9))/6
(9-3)/6
6/6
1

If it makes it easier, copy/paste that into a program with bracket highlighting like Notepad++.  Then choose most any programming language to better color the brackets and numbers.


Dude, that's exactly what I did, except that I actually have the correct value for 3^3, which is 27.
 
2017-12-29 02:00:26 AM  

Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.


On the opposite tack I hated writing and enjoyed math because getting the right answer was solely up to me and my ability to follow really simple rules. It didn't matter if the teacher didn't like me or I was unconvincing or his mood was funny; x=6.5 right or wrong no arguing. With writing I could write something that made sense to me and could get a C or an A depending on what teach' had for breakfast.

There is a beautiful equality to math or any rigorous logic. Your reputation or credentials can not support you in a wrong answer nor their lack hinder you in a correct one.
 

{ 33-(13--5)/2 } / 6
{ 27-√18/2 } / 6
{ 27-3 } / 6
24/6
4

Yes I was annoyed that  √ symbol meant the positive square root and not the total root (which would be symmetrical with ^2) when I learned it first too. In-line text makes for extremely difficult and occasionally ambiguous of equation parsing. I had to look at it ten times until I was satisfied with that interpretation.
 
2017-12-29 02:32:28 AM  
Fark:  making the Three Stooges look like geniuses.

Equivalent to (3^3-((13-(-5))/2)^0.5)/6, PEMDAS applies here; only the answer above by nmrsnr yielding 4 is correct.

Square root is a function and therefore yields exactly one value for any given integer which is always n or n*i where n is a non-negative real number; calculating roots for a binomial is not the same operation.

The brackets are applied correctly, the radical always has precedence and there is no alternative answer.

Mr. I hate the rules will make exactly zero contribution into the realms of math or AI in the future, but do expect him to provide a design for a perpetual motion machine in 2018.
 
2017-12-29 08:57:02 AM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: bobug: 5. Get examples of math that are relevant... WHY should you care about linear algebra? Because it can help you with figuring discounts, totals, etc.

[img.fark.net image 850x456]


For the masses, understanding  math would help them get interest on credit cards / payday loans / rent to own furniture, etc. It may not help them solve the issue, because needs must... I had a friend who didn't understand compounding interest until I showed her (this was in the 90s, and they didn't have to say how many centuries it would take to pay a card off with minimum payments.)
 
2017-12-29 12:45:57 PM  

snowjack: hammer85: snowjack: Birnone: My problem with math is I'm anti-authoritarian by nature, so any system that relies on rules, formulas, orders of operations, and other rigid formalities alienates me.

My problem with this statement is that none of those things are necessarily enforced by an authority. Sometimes it's just really hard to do stuff without following a very careful, rigid procedure.

For example, making lenses to correct a kid's nearsightedness is really exacting, there are precise rules that need to be followed, you have to do it the exact same way twice, or else that kid's not gonna be able to see. Does it mean you're a "tool of authority" if you succeed in correcting his vision, even if you figured out how to do it yourself?

Well the tool for the tool to make the tool is you, so....yes?

What authority figure made me follow the rigid rules and procedures?

My point is, there's way way more to math than doing what your math teacher says. If all someone got out of math classes was that it's an exercise in following authority, then I think that's a tragedy.


I more meant that you're the tool for the tool (lensmaking machine) to make the tool (lens)
 
2017-12-29 01:00:34 PM  

GitOffaMyLawn: King Something: 42

But what's the question?
The question is, "What is 6 x 8?"
But the answer to that is 48!
And that's the problem (with the universe).


No it was "what do you get when you multipy 6 by 9?" It messed up my nine's times tables for years as I heard the radio program reruns the year I learned my time tables.

/Not that old
//Still, off my lawn
///3 slashies because I am that old
 
2017-12-29 02:18:29 PM  

vegasgurl: GitOffaMyLawn: King Something: 42

But what's the question?
The question is, "What is 6 x 8?"
But the answer to that is 48!
And that's the problem (with the universe).

No it was "what do you get when you multipy 6 by 9?" It messed up my nine's times tables for years as I heard the radio program reruns the year I learned my time tables.

/Not that old
//Still, off my lawn
///3 slashies because I am that old


Thanks for the correction. I will have to break out my old BBC radio tapes of the Guide.

/ am that old
// currently have no lawn for people to get off of
/// get off my patio just doesn't have the old man yells at clouds ring to it
 
2017-12-29 03:50:20 PM  
hammer85: ...
I more meant that you're the tool for the tool (lensmaking machine) to make the tool (lens)

I'll admit that I have been a tool at times, though usually the person calling me that wasn't exactly trying to be nice.
 
2017-12-29 05:34:17 PM  

vegasgurl: GitOffaMyLawn: King Something: 42

But what's the question?
The question is, "What is 6 x 8?"
But the answer to that is 48!
And that's the problem (with the universe).

No it was "what do you get when you multipy 6 by 9?" It messed up my nine's times tables for years as I heard the radio program reruns the year I learned my time tables.

/Not that old
//Still, off my lawn
///3 slashies because I am that old


That part of it always cracked me up (thankfully I was beyond my multiplication when I got to it, in the books).
 
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