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(Phys Org2)   Viewing atomic structures of dopant atoms in 3-D relating to electrical activity in a semiconductor is so phat it's outtasight   ( phys.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Semiconductor, spectro-photoelectron holography, Electron, Extrinsic semiconductor, dopant atoms, 3-D atomic structures, individual dopant atoms, excess dopant atoms  
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1519 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Dec 2017 at 12:50 PM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-12-28 11:51:49 AM  
A Fark headline containing "Viewing atomic structures" paired with the "cool" tag?  Bet there are some awesome images to check out!!

No?

runt-of-the-web.comView Full Size
 
2017-12-28 01:01:37 PM  
But is it groovy? Will it knock me off my feet? Do I want it all but cannot have it?

/it's it!
 
2017-12-28 01:18:56 PM  

McGrits: But is it groovy? Will it knock me off my feet? Do I want it all but cannot have it?

/it's it!


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-28 01:21:16 PM  
I would have called it "dope", to use the parlance of our times.
 
2017-12-28 02:29:51 PM  
the work itself is fine, but the graphics and visualization are at least a decade behind the times.

/ several cover articles
// several phys.org and other presswire features
 
2017-12-28 04:08:11 PM  

McGrits: But is it groovy? Will it knock me off my feet? Do I want it all but cannot have it?

/it's it!


What is it?
 
2017-12-28 05:38:55 PM  
Dopants are materials present in another material in a quantity insufficient to create a new crystal structure (if there are enough to create a new crystal structure, it's generally called an 'alloy').  In semiconductors, the dopants are what create the electron 'traps' or 'donors' that cause the semiconductor to be either n- or p-type, which is the basis for literally every device you can pattern onto a wafer.

This paper is talking about the local ordering around the dopants, or the disruption of the crystal structure of the bulk material (e.g. the silicon or GaAs or whatever) around the embedded phosphorus/boron atom etc.  While it's not strictly accurate on a physical level to talk about atomic 'size' in this manner, a lot of it basically comes down to something analogous: toss a big marble into a tub of smaller marbles (or vice-versa) and the larger stacking pattern will remain mostly unaffected, whereas the marbles around the odd-one-out marble will be in a 'weird' configuration within a certain radius.  Keep in mind that the analogy is really rough, here, since the actual governing thing is orbital theory.

It's significant because while we've known what doping a semiconductor does since the 1950s, precisely why it does what it does to the conduction bands has been fairly ad-hoc and the prior models have never really been particularly specific in any manner that's useful from an engineering perspective.  This paper is taking advancements in crystal-structure-modeling that were developed recently for other purposes (most notably in my view, for modeling what the microstructure of materials that are amorphous... which is to say have no long-range order at all... look like) and the associated concepts of 'clusters' of extremely local order having significant geometry, and applying it to the new problem of how donor and trap structures work, exactly.

In short, understanding why an electron trap is a certain 'depth' is the first step in the process of engineering traps of a specific depth.  Potentially the work that this paper has done is worth basically all of the money.  This is why it's being noted everywhere even outside of the actual journals, even though in the tradition of pop science publications I think TFA doesn't really make the significance clear.

... OK, that's as reductive as I can go on this one, fill in any further gaps by taking a night class in chemistry or something, I can't translate any harder without writing a textbook.
 
2017-12-28 09:42:24 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Dopants are materials present in another material in a quantity insufficient to create a new crystal structure (if there are enough to create a new crystal structure, it's generally called an 'alloy').  In semiconductors, the dopants are what create the electron 'traps' or 'donors' that cause the semiconductor to be either n- or p-type, which is the basis for literally every device you can pattern onto a wafer.

This paper is talking about the local ordering around the dopants, or the disruption of the crystal structure of the bulk material (e.g. the silicon or GaAs or whatever) around the embedded phosphorus/boron atom etc.  While it's not strictly accurate on a physical level to talk about atomic 'size' in this manner, a lot of it basically comes down to something analogous: toss a big marble into a tub of smaller marbles (or vice-versa) and the larger stacking pattern will remain mostly unaffected, whereas the marbles around the odd-one-out marble will be in a 'weird' configuration within a certain radius.  Keep in mind that the analogy is really rough, here, since the actual governing thing is orbital theory.

It's significant because while we've known what doping a semiconductor does since the 1950s, precisely why it does what it does to the conduction bands has been fairly ad-hoc and the prior models have never really been particularly specific in any manner that's useful from an engineering perspective.  This paper is taking advancements in crystal-structure-modeling that were developed recently for other purposes (most notably in my view, for modeling what the microstructure of materials that are amorphous... which is to say have no long-range order at all... look like) and the associated concepts of 'clusters' of extremely local order having significant geometry, and applying it to the new problem of how donor and trap structures work, exactly.

In short, understanding why an electron trap is a certain 'depth' is the first step in the process of engineering ...


So we're not actually talking about dope. Great.
 
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