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(Gizmodo)   Not news: Portable hard drive. Fark: 1985   ( paleofuture.gizmodo.com) divider line
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3750 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Dec 2017 at 2:07 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-12-04 07:42:56 PM  
Woah!! Imagine how much the Bitcoins are worth on that mo' fo'!
 
2017-12-04 07:59:53 PM  
Your data online is only accessible if you can get online.  Silly net neutrality.
 
2017-12-04 08:00:30 PM  
My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.
 
2017-12-04 08:48:07 PM  

Cyberluddite: My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.


Hells yeah.  My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.  I thought that thirty megs was HUGE.  How wrong I was.

/Of course, I was also amazed by the amount of info on the Time Magazine cdrom.
//And then I was introduced to the world-wide web, and my porn collection changed forever.
 
2017-12-04 09:08:28 PM  

PainInTheASP: Hells yeah. My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.


My absolute first was a ZX80, with 1KB of RAM, and storage on compact cassettes.
 
2017-12-04 09:19:43 PM  

czetie: PainInTheASP: Hells yeah. My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.

My absolute first was a ZX80, with 1KB of RAM, and storage on compact cassettes.


We may be brothers in coding.  Timex Sinclair, myself.  I think it was the same chipset as yours,but I'd have to go back and look to be sure.
 
2017-12-04 09:28:01 PM  

czetie: PainInTheASP: Hells yeah. My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.

My absolute first was a ZX80, with 1KB of RAM, and storage on compact cassettes.


I went back and looked and the TS-1000 was a ZX81...close enough, bro.  :-)
 
2017-12-04 10:59:47 PM  
First computer was an Apple II+ but when I started college in 1989 (off my lawn) I was given a 286 PC.  Bought a 20MB hard drive a few months later for about $250.
 
2017-12-04 11:18:12 PM  
debug
g=c800:5

That's what I remember about my first hard drive
 
2017-12-04 11:37:24 PM  
A buddy and I pooled our money together and managed to purchase a *used* 10mb HD sometime in the later 80s.  We were running a BBS and had a 2 1541 (model 1 and 2), 2 1571s, and an Enhancer 2000 (POS but cheap).  The HD was a godsend.  We thought we had unlimited space.  We literally had to re-code the message forms (the BBS we had was a kind of open source thing...but not really open source) to max out the message index limit.  Good times.

My first PC in '89 had a farking Quantum Bigfoot.  I think it was 20mb.  It was loud as any old 5.25 floppy drive (nothing like a mid-90s SCSI though).
 
2017-12-04 11:54:48 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-05 12:02:41 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-05 12:33:27 AM  

czetie: PainInTheASP: Hells yeah. My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.

My absolute first was a ZX80, with 1KB of RAM, and storage on compact cassettes.


Same here.

And yesterday I downloaded as single JPEG image that around 80MB.
 
2017-12-05 12:36:05 AM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: [img.fark.net image 236x184][View Full Size image _x_]


I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.
  -- Thomas J. Watson (Head of IBM)

/the quote may be apocryphal according to Wiki.
 
2017-12-05 01:29:14 AM  

Cyberluddite: was about 4 megs


AKA a short .mp3 at 128kps.

I remember those computers. I remember the 1TB drive they released in the early 2000's that was the size of a VCR.

My current rig I bought 5 years ago has 32GB of RAM. I mean, WTF?!
 
2017-12-05 01:51:17 AM  
They weren't too were "portable,"

WAT
 
2017-12-05 02:02:47 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-05 02:05:30 AM  

PainInTheASP: Cyberluddite: My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.

Hells yeah.  My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.  I thought that thirty megs was HUGE.  How wrong I was.

/Of course, I was also amazed by the amount of info on the Time Magazine cdrom.
//And then I was introduced to the world-wide web, and my porn collection changed forever.


Circa 1999 that probably was a 30GB drive. Approximately 1536x the size of the drive in TFA.
 
2017-12-05 02:12:02 AM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size

It was like a whole new game.
 
2017-12-05 02:15:39 AM  
So?  I saw a 286 laptop in 1999.  It was being decommissioned, but the damned Corps wouldn't let me buy it.  It had to go to DRMO because of the serial number.  It must have been cutting edge tech prior to being decomissioned... the case was thick, and the screen itself covered maybe 1/8th of the lid.  It was tiny.  But it was amazing for the time.
 
2017-12-05 02:21:54 AM  
Portable hard drives seem like they're bound to go way of the dinosaur, thanks to the rise of services like Dropbox and Google Drive

Really?
 
2017-12-05 02:24:58 AM  

PainInTheASP: Cyberluddite: My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.

Hells yeah.  My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.  I thought that thirty megs was HUGE.  How wrong I was.

/Of course, I was also amazed by the amount of info on the Time Magazine cdrom.
//And then I was introduced to the world-wide web, and my porn collection changed forever.


Either you mean 30Gb or 1988.
 
2017-12-05 02:37:34 AM  
I swear to God this entire thread is turning into some kind of anachronism stew

/ 3TB network drive mostly full
//Already filled 1TB on a new intenral 4TB drive
//It's mostly not porn, slashies
 
2017-12-05 02:44:53 AM  

PainInTheASP: czetie: PainInTheASP: Hells yeah. My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.

My absolute first was a ZX80, with 1KB of RAM, and storage on compact cassettes.

I went back and looked and the TS-1000 was a ZX81...close enough, bro.  :-)


The Sinclair 1000 was my first also. Still have it.

My first hard drive was for my Amiga. It was 40 Mb and I bought it used for $400.
 
2017-12-05 02:46:43 AM  
I revisited the Dillards we bought an IBM PS2 at circa 1991 to make a return, and had to go over to customer service for a refund. There was our exact machine in customer service, still running after 25 years as a dumb terminal. The ancient CRT irradiating generations of staff with a light amount of X-rays that were deamed allowable.
 
2017-12-05 02:53:35 AM  

Ivo Shandor: [img.fark.net image 744x558][View Full Size image _x_]


Ah, the good old days.

If you don't recognize this image, get off my lawn.
 
2017-12-05 02:54:12 AM  

nekom: debug
g=c800:5

That's what I remember about my first hard drive


My people!
 
2017-12-05 02:56:12 AM  
I built my first computer by wire wrapping it on an S100 board. Based on the Intel 8080, it had a couple of 8 inch floppy drives and 8k of memory. SINGLE SIDED 8 inch floppy drives.

We were lint-sucking, coal-mining stumps, but we were grateful for what we had.
 
2017-12-05 02:59:54 AM  

UberDave:  We literally had to re-code the message forms (the BBS we had was a kind of open source thing...but not really open source) to max out the message index limit.  Good times.


What software was that, do you remember? I ran a QBBS site '91-'93 and played around with XBBS for a bit, but it was just too damn much work. A friend kept trying to get me into WWIV, but meh.
 
2017-12-05 04:00:18 AM  

jjorsett: I built my first computer by wire wrapping it on an S100 board. Based on the Intel 8080, it had a couple of 8 inch floppy drives and 8k of memory. SINGLE SIDED 8 inch floppy drives.

We were lint-sucking, coal-mining stumps, but we were grateful for what we had.


All glory to the 8086;  Effectively two 8080s slapped together with bondo.
 
2017-12-05 04:12:44 AM  
Fark:1985

It's 1985? I've got to warn people about Hitler!
 
433 [TotalFark]
2017-12-05 04:36:43 AM  

tjsands1118: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x219]
It was like a whole new game.


Yes, until the drives or the disks died. I was in college when the breakdown began to be widespread, Zip drive or disk failure was a nightmare for certain majors.

I ran a bunch of stff off zips, it was great. The only rival was the rewritable CD, and I don't think I've met a person yet that used those.
 
2017-12-05 05:10:49 AM  
Learned my C++ using a borrowed old red-screen dos laptop from the uni where I worked. It was a clunker even then but did the job.

Have not succeeded in finding out the model, or even who or why used the damned red screen instead of green at the time.. it was supposed to be superior.
 
2017-12-05 05:28:04 AM  

gaspode: Learned my C++ using a borrowed old red-screen dos laptop from the uni where I worked. It was a clunker even then but did the job.

Have not succeeded in finding out the model, or even who or why used the damned red screen instead of green at the time.. it was supposed to be superior.


I had one of those as well at a past job.  It was red because it was some kind of plasma display, not a CRT at all, and the red color was easier to build at the time.
 
2017-12-05 06:05:39 AM  

Sid_6.7: Ivo Shandor: [img.fark.net image 744x558][View Full Size image _x_]
If you don't recognize this image, get off my lawn.


Yep, one of the first photoshopped images.  It's a fake.
My neighbor bought an IMSAI-8080 which I had to build for him.  I developed a hard disk subsystem like the Maynard for Z-80 CPM and OASIS in 1980 with 10Mbyte HD which people bought for a mere $2000.
Moved data at 80-120 kilobytes/second - screaming.

The good old days.
My lawn is getting marred by your shoes, please leave.
 
2017-12-05 06:09:12 AM  

433: I ran a bunch of stff off zips, it was great. The only rival was the rewritable CD


Syquest EZ135 drive. Faster than Zip and reliable unlike the Zip.
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size

legacycomputersnparts.comView Full Size
 
2017-12-05 06:13:33 AM  

jaytkay: Syquest EZ135 drive. Faster than Zip and reliable unlike the Zip.


I remember the click of death.
 
2017-12-05 06:19:48 AM  

Archie Goodwin: Creepy Lurker Guy: [img.fark.net image 236x184][View Full Size image _x_]

I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.
  -- Thomas J. Watson (Head of IBM)

/the quote may be apocryphal according to Wiki.


i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2017-12-05 06:21:45 AM  
A long time ago I had a roughly 2 GB Seagate hard drive, which cost a fair amount, 2 or 300 dollars. One day it wouldn't work, so I sent it off to be repaired and it returned working fine, except my data was gone which made me sad.

Anyway, some time went by and it stopped working again. It may have been out of warranty by then. I unexpectedly discovered that shaking it in a rotary manner around the spindle axis made it work again! And that way I didn't lose my data.

So, I miss the good old days when shaking or whacking your equipment was the way to fix it.
 
2017-12-05 06:31:30 AM  

Cyberluddite: My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.


Purchasing a DOS PC in the late 80s, when the Amiga was available...

I btw. had a 20MB drive for my Amiga as well. The entire OS, and all the programs I used + my porn collection took up 7MB. So I had 13MB to play around with. :P

/sigh.
 
2017-12-05 06:39:07 AM  
It's a portable hard drive of savings at Maynard's!
 
2017-12-05 06:42:45 AM  

433: tjsands1118: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x219]
It was like a whole new game.

Yes, until the drives or the disks died. I was in college when the breakdown began to be widespread, Zip drive or disk failure was a nightmare for certain majors.

I ran a bunch of stff off zips, it was great. The only rival was the rewritable CD, and I don't think I've met a person yet that used those.


I have a RW-CD right here. But no, I never used them either.

The problem with RW-CD was, that you could use a standard CD for multiple writes, using multi-session.

I didn't really do multi-session either tbh. I weren't big on backups at that time, and when I wanted to move documents from my apartment to the university, I just emailed them to myself.

/girl from my class missed an exam deadline because she brought her document on a floppydisk. Of course it was faulty...
 
2017-12-05 07:26:41 AM  

dv-ous: PainInTheASP: Cyberluddite: My first PC, in the late 1980s (yes, I'm old) also had a 20 mb hard drive (having a hard drive at all was quite impressive in those days--most of my friends' computers had only two floppy drives, one for the boot disk and one for whatever program one was running at the time, and you had to remove one of the program floppies and stick in a blank disk in order to save or re-save a document or other file).  At the time 20 mb was a yuuuuuuuge amount of storage capacity and nobody could ever envision filling it up. I think in the years I had that computer, the maximum amount of data ever stored on that hard drive--all my programs, and all of my files (mostly WordPerfect documents, and there were tons of them)--was about 4 megs, about the same amount of data as a single decent quality photo today taken with a digital SLR or a good quality smartphone camera.

Hells yeah.  My first "modern" computer was a Compaq Presario with a 30Mb hard drive, circa 1999 or so.  I thought that thirty megs was HUGE.  How wrong I was.

/Of course, I was also amazed by the amount of info on the Time Magazine cdrom.
//And then I was introduced to the world-wide web, and my porn collection changed forever.

Circa 1999 that probably was a 30GB drive. Approximately 1536x the size of the drive in TFA.


LOL, yeah.

Begoggle: Either you mean 30Gb or 1988.


That.

/I blame the scotch.
 
2017-12-05 07:30:00 AM  
From the year I was born....
 
2017-12-05 07:35:54 AM  
First computer was an Acorn Atom with 4k memory. Bought the upgrade to give it a monster 12k.

Got my first thumb drive in 1999 cost me £128 for 64mb. Still works, though one octet died so it's only 56 mb usable.
 
2017-12-05 07:39:17 AM  
I have a computer at home which cost 60k German Marks when new. About the same as a house way back then. It's a Triumph Adler. Anyone? Anyone?

40k of the 60k was the harddrive with 20000 "units" (yes, 20 MB) with I don't know what port. As a CPU, it had a 68000 (same as later used in the Amiga 500) and an OS which I think was by who knows. Black/white gfx only.

Got it from a friend of my parents when they retired the system.

/my first HD cost 795 German Marks for a whopping 105MB for my Amiga 500
//A500 wasn't my first computer though
///good times
 
2017-12-05 07:45:07 AM  
First computer I used was a KayPro 64. Two 5.25 floppy drives. "Portable", if you liked lugging around a 30 pound suitcase. Played enough "Star Trek" on it that I'm surprised my eyesight doesn't have a permanent green tinge.
 
2017-12-05 07:48:46 AM  
Portable hard drives seem like they're bound to go way of the dinosaur, thanks to the rise of services like Dropbox and Google Drive.

Wrong.

1)Not everyone has reliable or fast internet.
2)Not everyone only travels to places with reliable inexpensive or fast internet
3)If the past couple of years have taught us anything it is that data breaches are a real possibility
4)I can spend a hundred bucks to have a physically small portable storage with huge capacity for the lifetime of the device and given that these are mostly solid state these days that's a long time, or I could pay a monthly fee to get access to enough storage from somebody else.
 
2017-12-05 08:12:26 AM  

UberDave: A buddy and I pooled our money together and managed to purchase a *used* 10mb HD sometime in the later 80s.  We were running a BBS and had a 2 1541 (model 1 and 2), 2 1571s, and an Enhancer 2000 (POS but cheap).  The HD was a godsend.  We thought we had unlimited space.  We literally had to re-code the message forms (the BBS we had was a kind of open source thing...but not really open source) to max out the message index limit.  Good times.

My first PC in '89 had a farking Quantum Bigfoot.  I think it was 20mb.  It was loud as any old 5.25 floppy drive (nothing like a mid-90s SCSI though).


The Quantum Bigfoots did not come out until the mid 1990s.  I was part of a beta program with them, they started at at 1.2 gigs.  I actually still have the drive in a box of junk.
 
2017-12-05 08:21:37 AM  
Heh... read that as 1895... but here we are:
img.fark.netView Full Size

Damned steampunks.
 
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