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(Boing Boing)   The internet used to be analog. You needed one of these to truly appreciate being "online," so to speak. If all you had was a phone book, you were like an AOL user. People with these were like TotalFarkers. They knew stuff, and where to get stuff   ( boingboing.net) divider line
    More: Spiffy, amazing Shelter books, Whole Earth Catalog, Earth Catalog, Earth Field Guide, Boing Boing, Lloyd Kahn, copy, Facebook feed  
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8332 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Nov 2017 at 4:35 PM (35 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-18 01:27:32 PM  
Christ... my dad used to have a collection of books like that.  Mom tossed them...
 
2017-11-18 01:46:25 PM  
I bought one at a yard sale at least 15 years ago for $2. I think it was from the early '70s. I love it.
 
2017-11-18 03:00:32 PM  
I had one when I was in high school (late 70's).

It was freaking awesome.

/no csb
 
2017-11-18 03:45:24 PM  
Took a second, but I found my copy. 1986 edition, I think.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-18 04:42:03 PM  
As much as AOL is shiat on, it was the internet entryway for a lot of people back then. And even on a dialup connection, I could still play Everquest with few problems.
 
2017-11-18 04:42:53 PM  
I still miss the sound of a modem handshaking.
 
2017-11-18 04:42:54 PM  
Text in any form is essentially digital Subby.
 
2017-11-18 04:45:00 PM  
"voodoo and a Swiss Army knife"
 
2017-11-18 04:47:51 PM  
I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.
 
2017-11-18 04:55:09 PM  

Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.


WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.
 
AOW
2017-11-18 04:57:44 PM  
For me the Whole Earth catalog took a backseat to the Heathkit catalog, I still have my Heathkit Oscope and multimeter, they rarely get used as the scope has a 10Mhz top and the meter is about as user friendly as a porcupine but I can still maintain them, as long as my supply of vacuum tubes lasts.


/spent many a happy hour with my soldering iron putting together my latest Heathkit
 
2017-11-18 04:57:50 PM  
Wow haven't though about the Whole Earth Catalog in years, the website version was one of the lesser known computer/internet defining publications.
 
2017-11-18 05:05:41 PM  
$23K for one acre in Tennessee in 1968? That seems really high. You cuold buy a house back then for like 10 grand.
 
2017-11-18 05:06:11 PM  

Huggermugger: Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.

WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.


That is all fine and good, but remember you are one power or net outage away from being basically clueless as to actually fix things. And, if there ever is a serious emp or cme ..... yeah- you will wish that you had actual books .
 
2017-11-18 05:08:59 PM  
Wow. I had "The Updated Last Whole Earth Catalog" It had a recipe for LSD next to directions on do-it-yourself artificial insemination for lesbians with help from a gay friend. Now THAT was forbidden knowledge!
 
2017-11-18 05:09:09 PM  
The one thing for me as a product expert (Apple) at Computerland's HQ that I remember in particular, was documentation. I used to have two HUGE file cabinets of product spec sheets and docs, that I spent maybe two hours a day just maintaining for reference. I still remember the day they took the cabinets away, because it was all online at the vendors,
 
2017-11-18 05:19:59 PM  

alienated: Huggermugger: Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.

WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.

That is all fine and good, but remember you are one power or net outage away from being basically clueless as to actually fix things. And, if there ever is a serious emp or cme ..... yeah- you will wish that you had actual books .


Saying "If there is ever a serious EMP" is the same as a kid telling you that one fire destroys all the knowledge you have, while he can have every edition of every copy of that book, plus thousands of various home improvement and DIY books on 3 e-readers with a couple solar rechargers that cost less than $100 total.

I love books. I have a library of thousands in the basement (mostly fantasy/sci fi) but the idea that the younger generation doesn't understand DIY because they don't have access to books is absurd, and playing "Get off my lawn" because our non-portable, highly flammable personal libraries aren't contained into a single piece of technology is a pissing contest where you have a very weak bladder.
 
2017-11-18 05:20:28 PM  

AquaTatanka: I still miss the sound of a modem handshaking.


Listening to them slowly negotiate the speed down to crap always sucked.
 
2017-11-18 05:26:25 PM  

Huggermugger: In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything


The time and effort that people put into high quality videos which they share for free is astounding.

A few recent projects I accomplished thanks to Youtube:
Replaced an automobile starter, spark plugs, and oxygen sensor
Replaced a clothes dryer igniter
Replaced a clothes dryer gas line
Replaced a toilet
Replaced the thermocouple, gas line and pilot burner on a gas boiler

All these were new tasks for me. I had never seen them done. I had no idea what an igniter was before I saw the video.

Thank you, Youtube people!
 
2017-11-18 05:37:30 PM  

Dodger: Our base libraries always carried all of the editions of the Whole Earth Catalog. My name is listed on the library cards of those books more than anyone else's I think. I'd sign them out again and again, reading the whole thing cover to cover like a novel then signing out the next one. I loved TWEC, but also all the different "Book of Lists" . I also read every edition of the Guinness Book of Records. To this day, I'm still a huge (but private) trivia buff.

It's sad but I think mine was the last personally self-sufficient generation. Everyone in my generation fixed their own stuff, built their own stuff when necessary, reveled in learning about how things worked so we could make'em work better or fix'em when they broke. I don't see any of that in my 3 grown kids or their peer group at all.


Part of rising living standards, though, isn't it? You can set aside the time to do something yourself, or pay someone to do it for you. It depends on how you value your own time.

Plus, with technological progress, it becomes that much harder to do DIY repairs. Fine example from just an hour ago: my left speaker wasn't working. Tracing the cable finds the fault (namely that my dog's chewed through the wires). Grabbed some bullet connectors that I had to hand, a pair of pliers, and a pair of scissors. Fixed within 5 minutes.

Now, say the speaker on my phone stopped working. What then?

My bro swapped the petrol engine in his 1986 Land Rover for a diesel one. But would he be able to do the same job in a modern Landie? You'd probably have to start with buying the diagnostic dongle to connect the motor to a computer, first.

We've traded mechanical simplicity for ease of use and greater efficiency.

The younger crowd always seem amazed that it's possible to do an oil change or tire rotation in your driveway. It's definitely a different world.

I could do either of those things, but professionals will do a better job of it, and, to me, it's worth the money to have a professional have a look at my car regularly.

Not very CSB: when I first heard of the concept of tyre rotation, I thought it was a joke, along the lines of changing blinker fluid or similar. I don't think most Brits bother with it. Just change the tyre once it's below legal tread depth, or you need to.

But the manual for my sexy little fusty explains how to do it. IIRC, it's nsr -> osf, osr-> nsf, and just shift the fronts to the rears without switching sides.

Sounds to me like a hell of a lot of extra effort for minimal actual savings, though. I don't have a supercar that needs new shoes regularly, and if I did, I'd have enough money to not really care about it.

Given the time taken to rotate tyres, is it actually worth it for most people, as opposed to changing tyres that are worn out as and when required?
 
2017-11-18 05:38:36 PM  

StaleCoffee: alienated: Huggermugger: Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.

WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.

That is all fine and good, but remember you are one power or net outage away from being basically clueless as to actually fix things. And, if there ever is a serious emp or cme ..... yeah- you will wish that you had actual books .

Saying "If there is ever a serious EMP" is the same as a kid telling you that one fire destroys all the knowledge you have, while he can have every edition of every copy of that book, plus thousands of various home improvement and DIY books on 3 e-readers with a couple solar rechargers that cost less than $100 total.

I love books. I have a library of thousands in the basement (mostly fantasy/sci fi) but the idea that the younger generation doesn't understand DIY because they don't have access to books is absurd, and playing "Get off my lawn" because our non-portable, highly flammable personal libraries aren't contained into a single piece of technology is a pissing contest where you have a very w ...


While you have a few valid points, perhaps I should have added "one big storm". There is still no power in many places in Puerto Rico. I do not mean to take anything away from the new tech, hell I have a lot of it myself. But I will be damned if I rely on an app  or *any* tech exclusively. Options are best always kept open.
 
2017-11-18 05:43:44 PM  
Yes. That's how it was.

It was charming and all, at the time, but in hindsight it really sucked.

/thank fsm for broadband
//porn. all the porn. porn porn ... ok some other stuff too
 
2017-11-18 05:45:20 PM  

jaytkay: Huggermugger: In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything

The time and effort that people put into high quality videos which they share for free is astounding.

A few recent projects I accomplished thanks to Youtube:
Replaced an automobile starter, spark plugs, and oxygen sensor
Replaced a clothes dryer igniter
Replaced a clothes dryer gas line
Replaced a toilet
Replaced the thermocouple, gas line and pilot burner on a gas boiler

All these were new tasks for me. I had never seen them done. I had no idea what an igniter was before I saw the video.

Thank you, Youtube people!


I guess I'm lucky I spent a decade as an indentured servant working on my father's rental properties.
 
2017-11-18 05:45:59 PM  

skinink: As much as AOL is shiat on, it was the internet entryway for a lot of people back then. And even on a dialup connection, I could still play Everquest with few problems.


AOL is still around, AFAIK.
 
2017-11-18 05:48:37 PM  

Dodger: It's sad but I think mine was the last personally self-sufficient generation.


/quote found on a cuneiform tablet, translated from the original Sumerian
 
2017-11-18 05:48:48 PM  
And FWIW, my favourite book for reading in the lavvy when I was a nipper was Usborne's book of Facts and Lists.
 
OOF
2017-11-18 05:49:04 PM  
It's a series of tubes afaik.
 
2017-11-18 05:49:55 PM  
I was a Total Fark before Drew sold out.
 
2017-11-18 05:58:17 PM  

johnphantom: AquaTatanka: I still miss the sound of a modem handshaking.

Listening to them slowly negotiate the speed down to crap always sucked.


Interesting factoid - when the amount of data involved was low (like a retail credit transaction), the old fixed-speed 2400 baud modems were faster.
 
2017-11-18 06:04:15 PM  
You can't have an analog Internet, non of the tub +++NO CARRIER
 
2017-11-18 06:09:30 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-18 06:12:12 PM  
What was the Mac desktop publishing Whole Earth (or Whole Earth-like) book?

I learned a ton from that. I also had a Whole Earth-like photography book. Great resource.
 
2017-11-18 06:18:08 PM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2017-11-18 06:25:18 PM  

jaytkay: Huggermugger: In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything

The time and effort that people put into high quality videos which they share for free is astounding.

A few recent projects I accomplished thanks to Youtube:
Replaced an automobile starter, spark plugs, and oxygen sensor
Replaced a clothes dryer igniter
Replaced a clothes dryer gas line
Replaced a toilet
Replaced the thermocouple, gas line and pilot burner on a gas boiler

All these were new tasks for me. I had never seen them done. I had no idea what an igniter was before I saw the video.

Thank you, Youtube people!


Thanks to youtube, recently replaced the pump on my old GE washer. Took less than anhour.
 
2017-11-18 06:34:40 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


What the analog Internet might look like.
 
2017-11-18 06:40:59 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: [img.fark.net image 336x500]

What the analog Internet might look like.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-18 06:45:40 PM  
Wait, so the Whole Earth Outlet in Marin County CA wasn't just a standalone thing?

/great memories
//even more awesome was Halted Specialties Corporation in Sillicon Valley.
 
2017-11-18 06:52:18 PM  

AquaTatanka: I still miss the sound of a modem handshaking.


I have the sudden urge to make that my ringtone.
 
2017-11-18 06:55:31 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: You can't have an analog Internet, non of the tub +++NO CARRIER


I think tubes mean it's not solid-state.  It can still be analog.
 
2017-11-18 07:35:15 PM  

Dodger: Our base libraries always carried all of the editions of the Whole Earth Catalog. My name is listed on the library cards of those books more than anyone else's I think. I'd sign them out again and again, reading the whole thing cover to cover like a novel then signing out the next one. I loved TWEC, but also all the different "Book of Lists" . I also read every edition of the Guinness Book of Records. To this day, I'm still a huge (but private) trivia buff.

It's sad but I think mine was the last personally self-sufficient generation. Everyone in my generation fixed their own stuff, built their own stuff when necessary, reveled in learning about how things worked so we could make'em work better or fix'em when they broke. I don't see any of that in my 3 grown kids or their peer group at all. The younger crowd always seem amazed that it's possible to do an oil change or tire rotation in your driveway. It's definitely a different world.


Amen to that, brother.
 
2017-11-18 07:47:22 PM  

alienated: While you have a few valid points, perhaps I should have added "one big storm". There is still no power in many places in Puerto Rico. I do not mean to take anything away from the new tech, hell I have a lot of it myself. But I will be damned if I rely on an app or *any* tech exclusively. Options are best always kept open.


Yes, a catastrophic natural disaster will do things like take out internet access, or library access.

Options are best kept open, absolutely. That's not the point of my response. What I replied to was:

Do you know the way to Mordor: There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.


Do you see that bolded part there? Apparently some people believe that the "current age of smartphones, tablets and computers" means "so many" people have "lost" the capability to learn how to "fix and do stuff to lesson your dependence on outside factors."

So if you, like the post I responded to, believe that, we have a conversation we can continue. If you want to alter the context or even the message itself in some way, please don't do so by using my response to an entirely different comment.
 
2017-11-18 07:49:13 PM  
I'm old enough to have owned first editions of the Whole Earth Catalog and Mother Earth News, which I subscribed to for about 10 years.  They were incredibly fun to read and to fantasize about, but they were often unrealistic.  For instance, the Whole Earth News admitted that one would need a microfilm reader to access the collected works of DIY, in the case of a general power crisis (the olden equivalent of an EMP).  Now, do you know anyone who even has seen a microfilm or microfiche reader in the last 10 years?  Even public libraries are having problems keeping theirs operational because spare parts are difficult to procure, and trained repairmen are even harder to find.  But who has the space to stock all the necessary information in book format?

It's very encouraging to know that the younger generations are really getting into Build movements.  My local public library has a whole section devoted to stocking parts for kids to work with Arduino and Raspberry Pi apps.  I attended a science day, and it was like attending the county fair, there were so many enthusiastic kids with their encouraging kids and teachers, and not just the kids from the rich schools.

As for the Mother Earth News 'back to the land' fantasy, in the 70s I lived in a few wannabe communes/countryside group houses, and learned that one could waste an immense amount of time doing things like grinding wheat and making compost.  It's not like there weren't a half-dozen supermarkets within 5 miles where we could buy wheat flour, and the compost never came out brown and crumbly, instead of gloppy and foul-smelling, because no one wanted to spend the time turning it on a regular basis.

And too many of those people I knew in the 1970s as hippies ended up being rabid Fox News Republicans.  I seem to recall that Stewart Brand adopted some controversial political beliefs, and the guy who started Mother Earth News turned into a wacko messianic who was trolling teenage girls in Asheville.
 
2017-11-18 07:52:50 PM  
Ah, the good old days, when the only people who used computers were geeks who knew how. No "cup holder" fails, no "where's the any key?", no White-Out on the screen. Good times.
 
2017-11-18 08:13:30 PM  
alienated:

Huggermugger:
That is all fine and good, but remember you are one power or net outage away from being basically clueless as to actually fix things. And, if there ever is a serious emp or cme ..... yeah- you will wish that you had actual books.


WEC had plans for a stationary bike-like contraption to generate power by pedaling. No need to be accept enslavement by The Man (Big Power)!

Unless you wanted to run a fridge overnight. But besides that.

/and we liked it!
//kids these days...
 
2017-11-18 08:14:45 PM  

alienated: Huggermugger: Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.

WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.

That is all fine and good, but remember you are one power or net outage away from being basically clueless as to actually fix things. And, if there ever is a serious emp or cme ..... yeah- you will wish that you had actual books .


To be fair, I think the US is more likely to have a self inflicted religious book burning than it is to have a North Korean EMP attack.
 
2017-11-18 08:18:26 PM  
Spacemet..
Lintilla.df.se:5xxx
/Get off my bulletin board..
 
2017-11-18 08:23:04 PM  

jaytkay: Huggermugger: In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything

The time and effort that people put into high quality videos which they share for free is astounding.

A few recent projects I accomplished thanks to Youtube:
Replaced an automobile starter, spark plugs, and oxygen sensor
Replaced a clothes dryer igniter
Replaced a clothes dryer gas line
Replaced a toilet
Replaced the thermocouple, gas line and pilot burner on a gas boiler

All these were new tasks for me. I had never seen them done. I had no idea what an igniter was before I saw the video.

Thank you, Youtube people!


I'm a diy car guy, and learned how to change plugs and tires before I could drive. Used to have to refer to Haynes manuals or friends for bigger jobs.  Now it's watch a  YouTube video, and I know exactly what tools I'm gonna need, approx how long it's going to take, and I'm tearing apart a model I've never worked on before. It's awesome that average, every day Joes and jills can now pick up that knowledge at their fingertips.  It's always astounded me that people are afraid to work on their cars or houses or whatever. Everything breaks down to nuts and bolts, and or being able to read a tape measurer. There's very little I can't do, partially because of life experience and upbringing, the rest I owe to natural curiosity and not wanting to depend on someone else to fix something that I'm completely capable of, with the right knowledge and tools.
 
2017-11-18 09:43:35 PM  

stonelotus: [upload.wikimedia.org image 230x300]


A "friend" sent a copy of that to me while I was in Oklahoma during 1984....in Army Basic Training.
This was in Mr Regan's Army, and the Soviets still existed. My drill instructors were not amused.
 
AOW
2017-11-18 10:50:28 PM  

stonelotus: [upload.wikimedia.org image 230x300]


Responded to many a call where teens found a copy of that book and tried to follow its recipes, especially the nitroglycerin one, they ended....badly....
 
2017-11-18 10:53:01 PM  

Huggermugger: Do you know the way to Mordor: I found one copy of this in the recycling bins of my flat and rescued it. A truly amazing book.

There are many people, especially on the right, who have disparaged the aims and nature of the hippie movement. For me, though, The Whole Earth Catalog was one of the greatest positive contributions the hippie movement ever made to mainstream culture.

There are people, i am sure, from every part of the political and religious spectrum, who would agree that learning how to fix and do stuff to lessen your dependence on outside factors is a good thing. Something so many have sadly lost in this current age of smartphones, tablets and computers.

WTF?  In just a few second I can find a dozen YouTube videos that demonstrate how to fix or tinker with anything.  I can Google a dozen descriptions of how to fix or tinker with anything else.  Back in the day, even with the Whole Earth Catalog, I would have had to either own several reference books, or else go to the library to learn more about something.


I am thinking about young people who are so obsessed with their computers and social media in a very superficial way that they don't learn anything much outside that. There are plenty of those kinds of people these days.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetec​h​/article-1352361/Children-spend-time-c​omputers-TV-exercising-week.html

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandst​y​le/2015/may/08/son-autistic-wont-do-an​ything-but-watch-youtube

https://www.newstatesman.com/art-and-​d​esign/2013/11/traditional-skills-are-b​eing-lost-designers-relying-computers
 
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