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(MSN)   Did you remember to salt your coffee this morning? No? What are you, some kind of sociopath?   ( msn.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Coffee, nearest coffee chain, ground coffee beans, daily caffeine fix, Cooking Light, disturbing personality trait, 9-month-old ring bearer, Supermodel fitness trainer  
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690 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 10 Nov 2017 at 10:20 AM (28 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



57 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-11-10 09:02:51 AM  
Salt makes everything taste better.
 
2017-11-10 09:13:14 AM  
I toss a teaspoon of Fry's Cocoa in my coffee sometimes. I've tried Ovaltine as well...meh.
 
2017-11-10 09:17:06 AM  
When I use my perculator, I crack an egg and toss shell and all in as well as salt.
My grandpa taught me that. He says that's how they were served coffee in the Pacific in WW 2
 
2017-11-10 09:17:15 AM  
Meh, an really old man told me this back in the earlt 80's.
 
2017-11-10 09:19:39 AM  

freddyV: When I use my perculator, I crack an egg and toss shell and all in as well as salt.
My grandpa taught me that. He says that's how they were served coffee in the Pacific in WW 2


Why not just toss an egg mcmuffin in the perc?
 
2017-11-10 09:31:30 AM  
Sorry.  I'm on a low fad diet.
 
2017-11-10 09:33:17 AM  
Liking my coffee black may reveal disturbing personality trait....
Hmmm...
*click*

OH GO FARK YOURSELF RD.COM. I'LL SHOVE YOU IN MY BURR GRINDER.
 
2017-11-10 09:36:26 AM  
I have tried this and it's awful. If you have decent coffee and decent water you don't need it. No amount of salt is going to make your Folgers taste good.
 
2017-11-10 10:00:26 AM  
I remember Alton Brown did this in his Good Eats coffee/espresso episode - specifically with the french press.  I tried that a couple of times - it's barely a pinch that is needed.  In any case, I didn't notice much of a difference but I was using at least medium quality beans (that I course ground myself).
 
2017-11-10 10:07:29 AM  
If you've ever worked at sea for long enough, land coffee won't taste the same. There's always a little salt in the fresh water supply.
 
2017-11-10 10:10:02 AM  
My father used to think sprinkling black pepper on vanilla ice cream (the good stuff with real beans) drew out the vanilla flavor more strongly.  I've tried it.  I can't tell any difference.
 
2017-11-10 10:17:47 AM  
I've been adding salt to my morning cup of coffee for a few months now.

I find bigger grains to be better overall.

I always wanted to try the egg method.
 
2017-11-10 10:17:59 AM  
I also put salt (and sugar, sometimes) on sliced tomatoes
 
2017-11-10 10:27:05 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: I also put salt (and sugar, sometimes) on sliced tomatoes


Sometimes I will on cantaloupe.  My grandfather did that.  Probably because they were too poor for prosciutto :-P
 
2017-11-10 10:38:01 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: I also put salt (and sugar, sometimes) on sliced tomatoes


Black pepper, chopped shallot and chives.
 
2017-11-10 10:39:27 AM  
Use enough coffee and it won't be bitter. Alton has shown us the way.
 
2017-11-10 10:44:02 AM  
I've had a Keurig for 3 years.  In all that time I have yet to find a brand of coffee offered in K-cups that actually tastes as good as brewed coffee.  The closest I've come to it is buying ground coffee and using one of those refillable cups you can buy.  When the Keurig dies it won't be replaced with another Keurig.
A pinch of salt isn't going to help the situation.
 
2017-11-10 10:49:11 AM  
Yes.
 
2017-11-10 10:57:12 AM  
Yes. Of course I did.  And by salt you mean whisky, right?
 
2017-11-10 10:57:44 AM  
A little salt allows flavors to "bloom" for everything.
 
OOF
2017-11-10 10:59:45 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-10 11:03:13 AM  
Starbucks medium roast, iced. Best coffee ever
 
2017-11-10 11:04:34 AM  
Let's see what Pete has to say about why we shouldn't drink the coffee...
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-10 11:04:52 AM  
This was an ongoing fight between my parents. Dad said it was the way to go but mom hated it. Sometimes he would sneak it in. She's dead now so he's free to salt away.
 
2017-11-10 11:24:45 AM  
I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.
 
2017-11-10 11:32:26 AM  
Can I be a sociopath and put salt in my coffee?
 
2017-11-10 11:37:49 AM  

NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.


One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.
 
2017-11-10 12:07:00 PM  

feanorn: Use enough coffee and it won't be bitter. Alton has shown us the way.


Also, use a French press
 
2017-11-10 12:33:25 PM  

IgG4: I have tried this and it's awful. If you have decent coffee and decent water you don't need it. No amount of salt is going to make your Folgers taste good.


Maxwell House will tho.
 
2017-11-10 12:37:23 PM  
I like coffee in my coffee, next you heathens will be espousing putting salt in your beer. *shudder*
 
2017-11-10 12:47:47 PM  
French Press and a pinch of salt.  Bring on the day!!!
 
2017-11-10 12:53:17 PM  
Butter goes in the coffee.
 
2017-11-10 01:00:58 PM  

freddyV: When I use my perculator, I crack an egg and toss shell and all in as well as salt.
My grandpa taught me that. He says that's how they were served coffee in the Pacific in WW 2


Was his name Rigby Reardon?
STEVE MARTIN MAKES COFFEE
Youtube LZ-kCE6YEno
 
2017-11-10 01:09:54 PM  

Moooooo K: I like coffee in my coffee, next you heathens will be espousing putting salt in your beer. *shudder*


Withdraws the goze offering.

/dilly dilly
 
2017-11-10 01:18:16 PM  

NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.


Maple Syrup is worth trying.
 
2017-11-10 01:19:43 PM  
I use this coffee: http://swroasting.com/singleo​rigin-cof​fee.html

Other high quality coffee would work.

I don't grind it too fine - actually the most coarse my grinder will do.

And I use a good coffee maker that gets the water plenty hot.

And it's wonderful.
 
2017-11-10 01:39:09 PM  

IgG4: I have tried this and it's awful. If you have decent coffee and decent water you don't need it. No amount of salt is going to make your Folgers taste good.


This
 
2017-11-10 01:48:15 PM  
I found out about putting salt in my coffee grounds from a former Navy guy I knew. He said that was how they always made it on board, just a small pinch per pot. Can't do that with a Keurig, though.
 
2017-11-10 02:11:29 PM  

squegeebooo: NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.

Maple Syrup is worth trying.


Given your profile location of upstate NY I assume you mean the concentrated blood of trees, not just slightly flavored corn syrup?

/extended family has a farm up practically in Plattsburgh
//mail orders the good stuff from them all the time
 
2017-11-10 02:13:10 PM  
Normally, I take my coffee straight black, by preference.

However, after reading some of these comments, I now have an urge to try adding a little cocoa powder or cinnamon to the drip basket the next time I brew a pot.
 
2017-11-10 02:21:09 PM  

NkThrasher: squegeebooo: NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.

Maple Syrup is worth trying.

Given your profile location of upstate NY I assume you mean the concentrated blood of trees, not just slightly flavored corn syrup?

/extended family has a farm up practically in Plattsburgh
//mail orders the good stuff from them all the time


Yup, if you don't personally know the person who tapped the tree, then you don't get to call it 'authentic'.  Simple rules for a simple folk.
 
2017-11-10 02:22:44 PM  

NkThrasher: squegeebooo: NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.

Maple Syrup is worth trying.

Given your profile location of upstate NY I assume you mean the concentrated blood of trees, not just slightly flavored corn syrup?

/extended family has a farm up practically in Plattsburgh
//mail orders the good stuff from them all the time


Ah, more old memories.  Sweet, sweet memories.

As I've said many times in these threads, I grew up on a dairy farm in SW PA.  We were in the southern part of the state, but up on top of a ridge, almost 3,000 ft. above sea level, so our climate was little more 'northerly' than you might expect.

We had a *lot* of Sugar Maple, and there was an old Sugar Camp back in the woods, where my ancestors collected sap and boiled it down.  Antique wooden keelers and spiles, the whole works.  Till some jackass hunter burned the whole thing down.

After that, we still collected sap and made syrup and maple sugar candy, but on a smaller scale.  Mom would boil it down on the wood / coal burning stove in the kitchen.

img.fark.netView Full Size


That stove, there.

Boy, did that ever steam up the house!  But the syrup was *wonderful*!
 
2017-11-10 02:26:25 PM  

Moooooo K: I like coffee in my coffee, next you heathens will be espousing putting salt in your beer. *shudder*


I salt my beer. I make a funnel with my hand and sprinkle salt into the bottle. Then again I salt watermelon, cantaloupe, apples. Salt makes nearly everything better.
 
2017-11-10 03:15:24 PM  

Slypork: freddyV: When I use my perculator, I crack an egg and toss shell and all in as well as salt.
My grandpa taught me that. He says that's how they were served coffee in the Pacific in WW 2

Was his name Rigby Reardon?
[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/LZ-kCE6Y​Eno]


LOVE that movie
IMO, Martin's best
 
2017-11-10 04:56:29 PM  

freddyV: Slypork: freddyV: When I use my perculator, I crack an egg and toss shell and all in as well as salt.
My grandpa taught me that. He says that's how they were served coffee in the Pacific in WW 2

Was his name Rigby Reardon?
[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/LZ-kCE6Y​Eno]

LOVE that movie
IMO, Martin's best


I love to watch it while wearing my pajamas and waiting for the Reinemachefrau.
 
2017-11-10 06:15:56 PM  

Moooooo K: I like coffee in my coffee, next you heathens will be espousing putting salt in your beer. *shudder*


My father in law does that. Picked it up in central America,  its a thing down there.
 
2017-11-10 10:05:30 PM  
I tried it.  It just makes the coffee taste salty, which is disgusting.  Totally disgusting.  What the fark is wrong with you put-salt-where-don't-belong people?
 
2017-11-10 11:17:35 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: NkThrasher: squegeebooo: NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.

Maple Syrup is worth trying.

Given your profile location of upstate NY I assume you mean the concentrated blood of trees, not just slightly flavored corn syrup?

/extended family has a farm up practically in Plattsburgh
//mail orders the good stuff from them all the time

Ah, more old memories.  Sweet, sweet memories.

As I've said many times in these threads, I grew up on a dairy farm in SW PA.  We were in the southern part of the state, but up on top of a ridge, almost 3,000 ft. above sea level, so our climate was little more 'northerly' than you might expect.

We had a *lot* of Sugar Maple, and there was an old Sugar Camp back in the woods, where my ancestors collected sap and boiled it down.  Antique wooden keelers and spiles, the whole works.  Till some jackass hunter burned the whole thing down.

After that, we still collected sap and made syrup and maple sugar candy, but on a smaller scale.  Mom would boil it down on the wood / coal burning stove in the kitchen.

[img.fark.net image 720x540]

That stove, there.

Boy, did that ever steam up the house!  But the syrup was *wonderful*!


wow, that looks like a museum exhibit.

On a stove like that do you keep the coals going all day and add wood when you need to up the temp or do you start a new fire when only when you need it?
 
2017-11-11 01:25:42 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Normally, I take my coffee straight black, by preference.

However, after reading some of these comments, I now have an urge to try adding a little cocoa powder or cinnamon to the drip basket the next time I brew a pot.


Cinnamon coffee is simply great.
 
2017-11-11 02:00:07 AM  

uber humper: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: NkThrasher: squegeebooo: NkThrasher: NewWorldDan: I put whipping cream in my coffee.  Anything less is uncivilized.

One time I ran out of creamer... and milk... and everything else that could be substituted... except vanilla ice cream.

Not something I'd do intentionally, but also not something that I'll avoid if it happens again.

Maple Syrup is worth trying.

Given your profile location of upstate NY I assume you mean the concentrated blood of trees, not just slightly flavored corn syrup?

/extended family has a farm up practically in Plattsburgh
//mail orders the good stuff from them all the time

Ah, more old memories.  Sweet, sweet memories.

As I've said many times in these threads, I grew up on a dairy farm in SW PA.  We were in the southern part of the state, but up on top of a ridge, almost 3,000 ft. above sea level, so our climate was little more 'northerly' than you might expect.

We had a *lot* of Sugar Maple, and there was an old Sugar Camp back in the woods, where my ancestors collected sap and boiled it down.  Antique wooden keelers and spiles, the whole works.  Till some jackass hunter burned the whole thing down.

After that, we still collected sap and made syrup and maple sugar candy, but on a smaller scale.  Mom would boil it down on the wood / coal burning stove in the kitchen.

[img.fark.net image 720x540]

That stove, there.

Boy, did that ever steam up the house!  But the syrup was *wonderful*!

wow, that looks like a museum exhibit.

On a stove like that do you keep the coals going all day and add wood when you need to up the temp or do you start a new fire when only when you need it?


Depends.  In the summer time, it was common for Mom to let the fire die out overnight and build a new fire in the morning.  In the wintertime, it was kept going constantly, but 'banked' overnight.

It was handy having the coal ashes to spread on icy walks, and on the road when needed.

Things weren't all stone-age.  In the picture, you can see the microwave oven on the table to the right, and the refrigerator freezer was pretty new.

Our farmhouse was itself an antique.  It was originally built in 1834 as a coach stop on the Forbes Road that crossed southern PA.  It was built by a guy named John Statler.  As I understand it, he later teamed up with some guy named Waldorf, and they built a hotel or two.

An addition was put onto the house in the early 1900's.  It had a second complete kitchen.  That one was outfitted with a gas oven.  So with the coal / wood stove, the gas oven, and the microwave, we were pretty well set.

Wiring and plumbing were a real biatch, though.

When I was a kid, we had a coal furnace, with hot water heating to radiators in each room.  When I was in high school, we converted to an oil furnace driving the same hot water heat.

Mom was a consummate farm housewife cook.  She turned out some amazing meals on that stove, which she played like a virtuoso.  Homemade bread, rolls, doughnuts, pies; ham loaf, roast chicken, pork chops...

I remember many times cranking the hand-powered ice cream freezer.  Homemade ice cream from our own cream and milk, with black raspberries we'd picked that morning.
 
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