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(Business Insider)   Target misses   ( businessinsider.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Minnesota, Broadsheet, St. Paul Pioneer Press  
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1776 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Nov 2017 at 2:50 PM (36 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-11-08 11:52:59 AM  
Retail apocalypse continues....
 
2017-11-08 12:35:31 PM  
with plans to refurbish 1,000 of its 1,8000 stores by 2020.

Boy, that's a lot of stores.
 
2017-11-08 03:08:26 PM  
9 stores being closed.  After 32 stores were opened in 2017.  With plans for another 38 stores being opened in 2018.   This is tuning the footprint, not "missing".

Go look at Sears for a miss.
 
2017-11-08 03:57:46 PM  

MadHatter500: 9 stores being closed.  After 32 stores were opened in 2017.  With plans for another 38 stores being opened in 2018.   This is tuning the footprint, not "missing".

Go look at Sears for a miss.


Those are all old style Targets, not Super Target formats.
 
2017-11-08 05:14:03 PM  
Someone around here really loves paywall insider
 
2017-11-08 05:57:46 PM  
Kirk:  I'm still here Brian Cornell.  I'm still here.  Like a poor marksman, you keep missing the target.  If you want me you're going to have to come down here.

Brian Cornell:  I've done far worse than kill you.  I've hurt you.  And I want to continue, hurting you.  I will leave you as you left me.  Marooned for all eternity next to an empty K-mart, in a building that hasn't been upgraded since the 1970's.
 
2017-11-08 06:05:06 PM  
Sounds like Target is going all in with locations that have grocery to compete better and are culling the ones that can't.
 
2017-11-08 07:24:05 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: MadHatter500: 9 stores being closed.  After 32 stores were opened in 2017.  With plans for another 38 stores being opened in 2018.   This is tuning the footprint, not "missing".

Go look at Sears for a miss.

Those are all old style Targets, not Super Target formats.


Target abandoned the 'Super' concept. The only new stores they are opening are tiny ones in well off cities. The big box model just isn't profitable anymore.

The stores they are closing are ancient, an area with poor demographics, or fairly new store that were built in areas where expected growth never came.
 
2017-11-08 07:30:59 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


Unavailable for comment.
 
2017-11-08 08:16:59 PM  
0.6% of the total number of stores are closing.  Might as well just liquidate and return the equity to shareholders.
 
2017-11-08 08:45:41 PM  

MadHatter500: 9 stores being closed.  After 32 stores were opened in 2017.  With plans for another 38 stores being opened in 2018.   This is tuning the footprint, not "missing".

Go look at Sears for a miss.


Go look at Target Canada for a miss.
 
2017-11-08 10:21:59 PM  
Baltimore West. Not really upscale there, more like inner city.
 
2017-11-08 10:52:12 PM  
I live in the same city as one of the stores that's closing.

Imagine an ideal Target demographic.

Imagine a neighborhood that's solidly working-class, majority-minority, heavily reliant on public transportation, and well-served by other local stores. 

Guess why things didn't work.
 
2017-11-09 01:06:52 AM  

Gonz: Imagine a neighborhood that's solidly working-class, majority-minority, heavily reliant on public transportation, and well-served by other local stores.


What are these other local stores?  When it comes to mass produced household shiat, it seems that the only choices anymore are Walmart and Target, with Target being a bit too upscale.

When I lived in Massachusetts I saw a single Walmart put a Caldor, Bradley, and Ames out of business.  Since then, the only other "general stuff" store I can remember seeing is Kmart, and they're gone now.  Sears never had what I was looking for, even when they were a going concern.
 
2017-11-09 04:33:12 AM  

flondrix: Gonz: Imagine a neighborhood that's solidly working-class, majority-minority, heavily reliant on public transportation, and well-served by other local stores.

What are these other local stores?  When it comes to mass produced household shiat, it seems that the only choices anymore are Walmart and Target, with Target being a bit too upscale.

When I lived in Massachusetts I saw a single Walmart put a Caldor, Bradley, and Ames out of business.  Since then, the only other "general stuff" store I can remember seeing is Kmart, and they're gone now.  Sears never had what I was looking for, even when they were a going concern.


Dollar General, Save-a-Lot, Family Dollar, to some extent Aldi... basically, smaller-format stores that are greater in number, closer to home, and sell cheaper stuff or stuff in smaller quantities (for people who can't afford to buy in bulk or can't be hassled to take a 24-roll of T.P. on the bus).

Quite a lot of space in Target (and Wal-Mart) stores is taken up by "nice" homegoods that most Americans simply can't afford. At some point, poor people get tired of walking 100 yards past stuff they'll never have money to buy so they can pick up a box of cereal that they could get cheaper at a discount store closer to home.
 
2017-11-09 12:13:03 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Baltimore West. Not really upscale there, more like inner city.


Mondawmin Mall happens to be where the Freddy Gray riots started.
 
2017-11-09 07:52:20 PM  

VoiceOfReason499: What are these other local stores?  When it comes to mass produced household shiat, it seems that the only choices anymore are Walmart and Target, with Target being a bit too upscale.

When I lived in Massachusetts I saw a single Walmart put a Caldor, Bradley, and Ames out of business.  Since then, the only other "general stuff" store I can remember seeing is Kmart, and they're gone now.  Sears never had what I was looking for, even when they were a going concern.


Dollar General, Save-a-Lot, Family Dollar, to some extent Aldi... basically, smaller-format stores that are greater in number, closer to home, and sell cheaper stuff or stuff in smaller quantities (for people who can't afford to buy in bulk or can't be hassled to take a 24-roll of T.P. on the bus).


Liquidator stores have a problem with selection.  They may not have basic items that didn't off the back of a truck that week.

Quite a lot of space in Target (and Wal-Mart) stores is taken up by "nice" homegoods that most Americans simply can't afford. At some point, poor people get tired of walking 100 yards past stuff they'll never have money to buy so they can pick up a box of cereal that they could get cheaper at a discount store closer to home.

I don't dispute that.  But I have learned not to get attached to favorite products from inventory liquidator stores.
 
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