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(CTV News)   Another day, another example of a car insurance company weaseling out of its contract   ( ctvnews.ca) divider line
    More: Asinine, Business, small Chevrolet SUV, Reporter Pat Foran, Small business, significant front-end damage, online insurance company, better insurance rates, business selling heaters  
•       •       •

2783 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Nov 2017 at 2:20 PM (36 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-06 09:24:48 AM  
A spokesperson for Sonnet told CTV: "If you use your vehicle for business, you may cover it under your personal policy as long as it doesn't have commercial plates and isn't used for deliveries, carrying passengers for hire, renting to others or as an emergency vehicle."

There's got to be some legally precise definition of "deliveries," though, or else pretty much any business use could be construed as "deliveries."  Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?

This lady should probably check with a lawyer if carrying a heater somewhere really qualifies as a delivery.
 
2017-11-06 01:21:11 PM  
If you use your vehicle for business, you may cover it under your personal policy as long as it doesn't have commercial plates and isn't used for deliveries, carrying passengers for hire, renting to others or as an emergency vehicle."

Also, the spokesmen has no idea what logic tables are.
 
hej
2017-11-06 02:42:29 PM  

Xcott: There's got to be some legally precise definition of "deliveries," though, or else pretty much any business use could be construed as "deliveries."  Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?


Yes.
 
zez
2017-11-06 02:44:20 PM  
"Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?
 
2017-11-06 02:44:46 PM  
So, I really feel that the important time for the insurance company to clarify this would be at the time that they quoted the policy, since she disclosed that it was used for business...
 
2017-11-06 02:51:02 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?


I think the heaters will keep the bedbugs warm thru the frigid winters.
 
2017-11-06 02:52:40 PM  
She switched to cheap online insurance and is shocked, shocked I say, to find out that they aren't as good as the company she used for years.
 
2017-11-06 02:57:10 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."
Is this a legit thing?


Yes. Bedbugs will die if subjected to a sustained high temperature of ~120 f.
The problem is getting the heat into all the places they can hide, like in the walls.
 
2017-11-06 02:57:58 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?


It's exceptionally effective when done professionally, dunno about home use. They seal each room up tight, door sills, window sills, vents etc, and then run the heater, keep the room at something like 130-140* for a few hours, it kills the bedbugs.

/wife was a property manager for a number of years
 
2017-11-06 02:58:29 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?


It is. Since they have become resistant to insecticides, heat is often used. Around 122 deg F knocks them down fairly quickly.

Me, I have a friend with a walk-in freezer. I'd trust putting my infested furniture in that for four days more than using heat treatment.
 
2017-11-06 03:06:18 PM  

Nightjars: So, I really feel that the important time for the insurance company to clarify this would be at the time that they quoted the policy, since she disclosed that it was used for business...


Wait, so they took her premium payments knowing she used her vehicle for business purposes but then, when she made a claim, denied it because "business purposes" included occasional deliveries?  Are they going to refund her premiums since they couldn't provide the service she was paying for?
 
2017-11-06 03:13:21 PM  
If they are voiding your policy on any grounds, doesn't that essentially mean that you were not covered the whole time?  And as such shouldn't the insurance company have to give the money that you've spent back + interest that would have accrued?
 
2017-11-06 03:16:00 PM  

WxGuy1: Nightjars: So, I really feel that the important time for the insurance company to clarify this would be at the time that they quoted the policy, since she disclosed that it was used for business...

Wait, so they took her premium payments knowing she used her vehicle for business purposes but then, when she made a claim, denied it because "business purposes" included occasional deliveries?  Are they going to refund her premiums since they couldn't provide the service she was paying for?


RogueWallEnthusiast: If they are voiding your policy on any grounds, doesn't that essentially mean that you were not covered the whole time?  And as such shouldn't the insurance company have to give the money that you've spent back + interest that would have accrued?


And of course I'm not the first with that line of thinking.  Edgar Albert Guest is full of shiate.

/
Full many a time a thought has come
That had a bitter meaning in it.
And in the conversation's hum
I lost it ere I could begin it.

I've had it on my tongue to spring
Some poisoned quip that I thought clever;
Then something happened and the sting
Unuttered went, and died forever.

A lot of bitter thoughts I've had
To silence fellows and to flay 'em,
But next day always I've been glad
I wasn't quick enough to say 'em.
Edgar Albert Guest
 
2017-11-06 03:16:36 PM  

a_room_with_a_moose: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

It is. Since they have become resistant to insecticides, heat is often used. Around 122 deg F knocks them down fairly quickly.

Me, I have a friend with a walk-in freezer. I'd trust putting my infested furniture in that for four days more than using heat treatment.


Sounds good. Now just cut up your walls and floors and shiat and take them to the freezer.
 
2017-11-06 03:17:43 PM  

hej: Xcott: There's got to be some legally precise definition of "deliveries," though, or else pretty much any business use could be construed as "deliveries."  Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?

Yes.


So, I shouldn't give the customer a receipt?
 
2017-11-06 03:19:18 PM  

RogueWallEnthusiast: If they are voiding your policy on any grounds, doesn't that essentially mean that you were not covered the whole time?  And as such shouldn't the insurance company have to give the money that you've spent back + interest that would have accrued?


They'll probably refund the earned premium.

Every personal insurance policy has a similar exclusion. If you're a business, you should have business insurance.
 
2017-11-06 03:23:23 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?


Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.
 
2017-11-06 03:28:51 PM  
God I love insurance companies lines of reasoning. One or my workers had her neighbor's tree fall Ono her property and scratch her car. So, she filed a claim against their homeowners policy since it was their tree. Get this gem, they said that if the homeowner knew it was dead, then they are negligent and insurance doesn't pay for negligence. If they didn't know, then it was an act of nature.....and they don't have to pay for act of natures. Isn't it great to run a racquet like that? I bet somewhere thr mob is jealous they can't get a license to start an insurance company and fark people over like that.
 
2017-11-06 03:31:42 PM  
Just playing devil's advocate here, but I'd wager all that information was in the fine print on the web site, but the lady ignored it like we all do.
 
2017-11-06 03:37:19 PM  

DRTFA: Just playing devil's advocate here, but I'd wager all that information was in the fine print on the web site, but the lady ignored it like we all do.


THAT's your devil's advocate??
That she did not read micro-fine print in a super light shade of grey that even young-people eyes have a problem comprehending?
Quite a reach.

I am pretty sure the only people who read all the fine print in a document are (very bored) contract lawyers.
 
2017-11-06 03:37:51 PM  
Wait, she bought bottom-dollar insurance and we're supposed to be surprised that it was a gutted and bare-bones policy that only covered the bare minimum and left the company with a ton of loopholes?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-06 03:45:00 PM  

jayphat: So, she filed a claim against their homeowners policy since it was their tree. Get this gem, they said that if the homeowner knew it was dead, then they are negligent and insurance doesn't pay for negligence. If they didn't know, then it was an act of nature.....and they don't have to pay for act of natures. Isn't it great to run a racquet like that? I bet somewhere thr mob is jealous they can't get a license to start an insurance company and fark people over like that.


I'm sorry you have a difficulty understanding logic and liability.
 
2017-11-06 03:46:19 PM  

JohnBigBootay: a_room_with_a_moose: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

It is. Since they have become resistant to insecticides, heat is often used. Around 122 deg F knocks them down fairly quickly.

Me, I have a friend with a walk-in freezer. I'd trust putting my infested furniture in that for four days more than using heat treatment.

Sounds good. Now just cut up your walls and floors and shiat and take them to the freezer.


Very rarely does C. lectularius get in the walls. Cracks in the moulding, or creases in bedding and mattresses, yes. Under your wall to wall carpet or between the walls - unlikely. They have to come out and out and regularly feed, you know.

If they are in your walls, you have bat bugs
(Cimex adjunctus, where I am) and getting rid of the bats fixes that problem.

But what do I know? I've only been an entomologist for a couple of decades, or so.
 
2017-11-06 03:46:34 PM  

omg bbq: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.


You can also turn the heat off and let them freeze to death when the temperature dips below 0C.
 
2017-11-06 03:49:23 PM  

mcreadyblue: omg bbq: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.

You can also turn the heat off and let them freeze to death when the temperature dips below 0C.


Yes if you live in a place that drops that low.  However letting the inside of your house reach actual freezing temps and letting in soak in can be pretty disastrous.
IMO it's more reasonable to just cook em
 
hej
2017-11-06 03:52:54 PM  

Xcott: hej: Xcott: There's got to be some legally precise definition of "deliveries," though, or else pretty much any business use could be construed as "deliveries."  Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?

Yes.

So, I shouldn't give the customer a receipt?


I don't follow.  If you buy something which has to be delivered from a remote place to the place you want to receive it, this is considered "delivering" it.  I'm not understanding what a receipt has to do with this or what other distinction you're trying to make here.
 
2017-11-06 04:00:06 PM  

mcreadyblue: omg bbq: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.

You can also turn the heat off and let them freeze to death when the temperature dips below 0C.


Drain the water lines, though.

If you don't know wether you have bat- or bedbugs, heat is really the best way to go.

But if it is batbugs, you will have a reoccurring problem until you exclude the hosts. Batbugs can't successfully reproduce on human blood.
 
2017-11-06 04:01:02 PM  

a_room_with_a_moose: mcreadyblue: omg bbq: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.

You can also turn the heat off and let them freeze to death when the temperature dips below 0C.

Drain the water lines, though.

If you don't know wether you have bat- or bedbugs, heat is really the best way to go.

But if it is batbugs, you will have a reoccurring problem until you exclude the hosts. Batbugs can't successfully reproduce on human blood.


*whether

I has words. The bestly.
 
2017-11-06 04:03:45 PM  

hej: I don't follow. If you buy something which has to be delivered from a remote place to the place you want to receive it, this is considered "delivering" it. I'm not understanding what a receipt has to do with this or what other distinction you're trying to make here.


I asked:  "Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?"

A receipt is a physical thing that I bring to a customer and leave on site.  Surely that isn't a "delivery."
 
2017-11-06 04:08:22 PM  

Xcott: I asked:  "Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?"


If you own a business and in the course of your business you drive to a customer's site with your personal auto and drop off anything, you may want to read your insurance policy.

I don't know if 'delivery' is necessarily an exclusion in US policies, but if you have a business and use your car for business, you should really read your insurance.

Same thing if you use your home as part of your business.
 
2017-11-06 04:09:21 PM  

Xcott: hej: I don't follow. If you buy something which has to be delivered from a remote place to the place you want to receive it, this is considered "delivering" it. I'm not understanding what a receipt has to do with this or what other distinction you're trying to make here.

I asked:  "Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?"

A receipt is a physical thing that I bring to a customer and leave on site.  Surely that isn't a "delivery."


Why wouldn't it be? You are providing a service by taking something to someone. There are two modes for this: doing it as a favor, and doing it as part of a business transaction. She did it as part of a business transaction, and people here are all outraged that her non-business-insurance refused to cover it.
 
2017-11-06 04:10:52 PM  

omg bbq: mcreadyblue: omg bbq: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

Yes, it is pretty much the only way to kill the farkers.

You seal up a room, leave everything in it, and raise temps somewhere over 110deg F, I forget, but it is HOT. Then you let it sit like that for a long time (longer than you think) so it can soak into the mattress and anything that can insulate from the heat.  Then you come home from your weekend getaway to a house that is bed bug free, except for the bedbugs that are living in your clothing and what not.

I am not even kidding when I say that bedbugs are one of the worst things to have in your life, to get rid of them requires you to pretty much: Put yourself in a bubble, have professionals heat your car to kill the ones in there, seal and heat your house to kill those, have the clothing you are wearing be washed in super hot water, get in freshly bought clothing that has not ever been in your house, get in your cleaned out car, and leave the house for a couple days.

Then make sure that none of your ratty bed bug carrying friends ever step the fark inside your house again.

All because you wanted to save a $ by buying a used mattress or staying in a cheap hotel.

You can also turn the heat off and let them freeze to death when the temperature dips below 0C.

Yes if you live in a place that drops that low.  However letting the inside of your house reach actual freezing temps and letting in soak in can be pretty disastrous.
IMO it's more reasonable to just cook em


That's why I would use a combination of flame thrower and home owners' insurance.
 
2017-11-06 04:16:50 PM  
Auto insurance companies are obviously hurting, and having a hard time.
If they were doing well they would have all kinds of competing "clever" ads on TV just to spend profits.
 
2017-11-06 04:23:21 PM  

zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?


I would think so. I stopped a post-trip infestation by using a heat-gun on our bed-clothes, mattress seams and luggage.
 
2017-11-06 04:24:31 PM  

Carousel Beast: She did it as part of a business transaction, and people here are all outraged that her non-business-insurance refused to cover it.


Not quite - she was using the car for personal reasons (going to visit a friend) when she had the accident.  The insurance company then went back through old correspondence, found her comment that she uses the car for work, and used that to void the policy.  They should have properly underwritten her policy and notified her before taking her premiums and issuing her policy.  The article isn't clear, but it seems the insurer had the data it used to void the policy all along.  I think insurers get a lot of flack for perfectly reasonable, legal behavior, but this situation seems pretty sleazy, or at least very sloppy on the part of the insurer.
 
2017-11-06 04:27:10 PM  

Carousel Beast: Why wouldn't it be?


Why wouldn't it be a considered a "delivery" to hand someone a physical receipt?!

Well, I suppose two reasons.  First, it obviously isn't what people mean by the word "delivery."  If I clean your gutters and give you a receipt, I can't stiff you with a $70 "delivery charge" for the act of handing you the receipt.  That's because giving you a receipt is not a "delivery."  Even though a receipt is a thing and I am giving it to you.

Secondly, if we define the word "delivery" in such a ridiculous way to include even the act of leaving the customer with a receipt, then virtually all business use of a vehicle is "deliveries," and there's no reason to even have a "deliveries" exception written into the law.  

I think it is quite clear that the word "delivery" applies to a certain customary delivery of goods, like delivering pizza or delivering packages---but it does not cover every act of leaving a physical item or substance with a customer.  Accidentally leaving a pen behind does not make your car a "delivery vehicle."  Neither does leaving a receipt, and in my opinion neither does leaving some screws or duct tape as part of a repair.
 
2017-11-06 04:31:32 PM  

Cubicle Jockey: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."
Is this a legit thing?

Yes. Bedbugs will die if subjected to a sustained high temperature of ~120 f.
The problem is getting the heat into all the places they can hide, like in the walls.


There is a solution in how to get the heat into there:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-11-06 05:09:06 PM  

a_room_with_a_moose: JohnBigBootay: a_room_with_a_moose: zez: "Winterhelt owns a small business selling heaters to kill bedbugs."

Is this a legit thing?

It is. Since they have become resistant to insecticides, heat is often used. Around 122 deg F knocks them down fairly quickly.

Me, I have a friend with a walk-in freezer. I'd trust putting my infested furniture in that for four days more than using heat treatment.

Sounds good. Now just cut up your walls and floors and shiat and take them to the freezer.

Very rarely does C. lectularius get in the walls. Cracks in the moulding, or creases in bedding and mattresses, yes. Under your wall to wall carpet or between the walls - unlikely. They have to come out and out and regularly feed, you know.

If they are in your walls, you have bat bugs
(Cimex adjunctus, where I am) and getting rid of the bats fixes that problem.

But what do I know? I've only been an entomologist for a couple of decades, or so.


What does studying the history of words have to do with bugs?
 
2017-11-06 05:13:37 PM  
Insurance companies only make money if they don't pay out.
 
2017-11-06 05:54:33 PM  
I've always wondered why conservatives get so worried about everyone having to have medical insurance, but they never say a word about required auto insurance.
 
2017-11-06 06:17:52 PM  

youre killing independent george: Wait, she bought bottom-dollar insurance and we're supposed to be surprised that it was a gutted and bare-bones policy that only covered the bare minimum and left the company with a ton of loopholes?

[img.fark.net image 400x304]


Exactly, if you have a business it's best to pay extra to have a direct person to to talk to about

1 insurance
2 law
3 accounting
4 investments

They are there to work for you if even just a few hours a year.
 
2017-11-06 08:01:50 PM  

etoof: I've always wondered why conservatives get so worried about everyone having to have medical insurance, but they never say a word about required auto insurance.


1) you don't have to have a car
2) there are other ways to meet financial responsibility laws without insurance
3)the car insurance marketplace, though flawed, is not beyond farked up
 
2017-11-06 08:14:40 PM  

RogueWallEnthusiast: If they are voiding your policy on any grounds, doesn't that essentially mean that you were not covered the whole time?  And as such shouldn't the insurance company have to give the money that you've spent back + interest that would have accrued?


Also the state might to take an interest in this because they forced the woman to not have insurance and I am pretty sure that all states require some insurance of some sort. Would they not be guilty of fraud by deception?
 
2017-11-06 08:19:18 PM  

Xcott: A spokesperson for Sonnet told CTV: "If you use your vehicle for business, you may cover it under your personal policy as long as it doesn't have commercial plates and isn't used for deliveries, carrying passengers for hire, renting to others or as an emergency vehicle."

There's got to be some legally precise definition of "deliveries," though, or else pretty much any business use could be construed as "deliveries."  Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?

This lady should probably check with a lawyer if carrying a heater somewhere really qualifies as a delivery.


I use my vehicle all the time to deliver myself to a location where a meeting is expected to occur. Is that a delivery?

Honestly I'm torn 50/50 on this. I totally get where the insurance company is coming from but unless the accident occurred during an obvious business delivery then it shouldn't be voided. On the flip side, I'm tired of this race to the bottom for the cheapest everything, if you buy a discount policy know that this is how they keep those policies discounted because the don't cover everything and frequently use every gimmick in the book as an excuse not to pay or at the very least to pay out less. It's cheap for a reason and typically it's not because their risk pool includes better drivers.

Ultimately I hope her business has solid liability insurance and umbrella coverage that she can use to pass the buck to if her personally insurance is refusing to cover it.
 
2017-11-06 08:21:59 PM  

MugzyBrown: etoof: I've always wondered why conservatives get so worried about everyone having to have medical insurance, but they never say a word about required auto insurance.

1) you don't have to have a car
2) there are other ways to meet financial responsibility laws without insurance
3)the car insurance marketplace, though flawed, is not beyond farked up


Oh, I get that. I'm just surprised some of the lower-IQ people don't.
 
2017-11-06 08:53:53 PM  

MugzyBrown: RogueWallEnthusiast: If they are voiding your policy on any grounds, doesn't that essentially mean that you were not covered the whole time?  And as such shouldn't the insurance company have to give the money that you've spent back + interest that would have accrued?

They'll probably refund the earned premium.

Every personal insurance policy has a similar exclusion. If you're a business, you should have business insurance.


So, you've never used your personal car to run an errand for your employer?
I'm not saying that's what his lady does. She says she occasionally would take a heater to someone using the car, as if she was doing this on the way home from work.  If that's true, the insurance company is being shady, especially if they knew this and continued accepting payments. Now, if she was delivering stuff for a few hours a day, that's a different story. Usually, this stuff is based on the "principal use" of the car.
 
2017-11-06 09:01:27 PM  

Carousel Beast: Xcott: hej: I don't follow. If you buy something which has to be delivered from a remote place to the place you want to receive it, this is considered "delivering" it. I'm not understanding what a receipt has to do with this or what other distinction you're trying to make here.

I asked:  "Is it a delivery if I bring any physical thing to a customer and leave it on site?"

A receipt is a physical thing that I bring to a customer and leave on site.  Surely that isn't a "delivery."

Why wouldn't it be? You are providing a service by taking something to someone. There are two modes for this: doing it as a favor, and doing it as part of a business transaction. She did it as part of a business transaction, and people here are all outraged that her non-business-insurance refused to cover it.


She wasn't using the car for business at the time of the accident. And it sounds like the insurance company knew how the car was being used, yet continued to accept payment. If so, exactly what were they insuring? I'd be fully on the insurance company's side if she had been making a delivery at the time of the accident, or if they had, upon learning of her occasional use of the car for business purposes, had informed her of the consequences at the time, or if she was in fact routinely using the car for business.
 
2017-11-06 10:36:47 PM  
I do light contract work in weekends, generally within ten miles of my house. I buy things like paint, vinyl spackle, etc., and often leave the extra for the homeowner, particularly paint. I bill for the materials, but haven't been paid in advance.

I suppose I am technically delivering them, but as building materials for which I don't charge a delivery fee, just straight time.

Huh. I'd bette check my insurance policy and check with HR to make sure my legal insurance is up to date.
 
2017-11-06 11:29:52 PM  
I'm blaming the insurance company for not up-selling her commercial auto insurance. That's where the money is at.
 
2017-11-07 04:33:05 AM  
When she signed up for auto insurance with Sonnet Insurance, she says she revealed that she uses her vehicle for work 30 per cent of the time.

That's not "occasional" business use.
 
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