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(Wikipedia)   This week in the Saturday Morning Book Club: the works of Stephen King   ( en.wikipedia.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Stephen King, Locus Award, Bram Stoker Award, Dark Tower, nominee, British Fantasy Award, World Fantasy Award, Fantasy Award nominee  
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131 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 04 Nov 2017 at 10:00 AM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-04 07:53:10 AM  
I am Constant Reader.
 
2017-11-04 08:01:48 AM  
At the very top of my list are Dark Tower series and Firestarter. At the very bottom is Tommyknockers or Rose Madder. Or maybe Gerald's Game. Or maybe the Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon.

Love a lot of his short fiction. Shawshank and The Man in the Black Suit come immediately to mind.

One collection that can be entirely skipped is "Blockade Billy"
 
2017-11-04 08:03:02 AM  
The Talisman but not Black House, which was garbage.

The original Gunslinger, before all the retconning. Drawing of The Three and The Wastelands were amazing. Everything after that was awful.

But he is best writing short stories and novellas. Night Shift, Four Past Midnight and Different Seasons were all great.
 
2017-11-04 08:04:48 AM  
Black House wasn't garbage, it was awesome. Just not the same sort of book at all. Great read on a dreary day.
 
2017-11-04 08:08:01 AM  
And of his recent books, because for god's sake, we're not in 8th grade and it's not 1984 anymore, Revival and the Mr. Mercedes I really enjoyed. Didn't care a bit for Doctor Sleep. Haven't read the new one he wrote with his son Owen yet, but I'll probably read the new Joe Hill anthology before I get around it anyway. Joe Hill out-Stephen Kings his own father.
 
2017-11-04 08:08:12 AM  
Remember: The Talisman and Black House both had a co-author, Peter Straub.
 
2017-11-04 08:08:32 AM  
*Mr. Mercedes trilogy I mean
 
2017-11-04 08:13:35 AM  
Cujo.
 
2017-11-04 08:15:31 AM  
There's no debate that he is a very successful writer.  Seems to be almost branding it, though, with books written with one son, and promoting the other son's book at the same time.

The son bit seems a bit unfair. How many other writers get tweeted by SK?
 
2017-11-04 08:18:53 AM  
Carrie.
 
2017-11-04 08:20:50 AM  

BalugaJoe: Cujo.


I went looking for a gif of a dog getting smacked on the nose with a newspaper but was detoured by this.
i1.kym-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2017-11-04 08:22:22 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: There's no debate that he is a very successful writer.  Seems to be almost branding it, though, with books written with one son, and promoting the other son's book at the same time.

The son bit seems a bit unfair. How many other writers get tweeted by SK?


I have read stuff by Joe. He is a fantastic writer in his own right.
 
2017-11-04 08:24:18 AM  

RJReves: ElizaDoolittle: There's no debate that he is a very successful writer.  Seems to be almost branding it, though, with books written with one son, and promoting the other son's book at the same time.

The son bit seems a bit unfair. How many other writers get tweeted by SK?

I have read stuff by Joe. He is a fantastic writer in his own right.


I haven't, so I bow to your judgment.
 
2017-11-04 08:24:42 AM  

Confabulat: And of his recent books, because for god's sake, we're not in 8th grade and it's not 1984 anymore, Revival and the Mr. Mercedes I really enjoyed. Didn't care a bit for Doctor Sleep. Haven't read the new one he wrote with his son Owen yet, but I'll probably read the new Joe Hill anthology before I get around it anyway. Joe Hill out-Stephen Kings his own father.


Speaking of Joe Hill, I did really enjoy The Fireman.
 
2017-11-04 08:28:01 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: RJReves: ElizaDoolittle: There's no debate that he is a very successful writer.  Seems to be almost branding it, though, with books written with one son, and promoting the other son's book at the same time.

The son bit seems a bit unfair. How many other writers get tweeted by SK?

I have read stuff by Joe. He is a fantastic writer in his own right.

I haven't, so I bow to your judgment.


Of course, having the father he has undoubtedly helped in getting read by a publisher.

But, yeah, worth a read. I would highly recommend "Horns"
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-11-04 08:29:29 AM  
I liked Tommyknockers, but I don't go around telling people to read it. I have always thought that a good editor could have turned Tommyknockers into a great SF horror novel. It was around the transition from good short fiction to editorless bloated bricks. I have a few of the late King bricks which I didn't finish or didn't start.
 
2017-11-04 08:34:50 AM  
I like his shorter stories but the only 'replace a broken couch leg' sized book of his that I could make it all the way through was 'The Stand'
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-11-04 08:37:30 AM  
Recoil Therapy

The original Stand was one of the books from the time when editors could make him cut material. Even though it's big it could have been bigger. Later, it was bigger.
 
2017-11-04 08:49:24 AM  
King and in general, 11/22/63 is the best fiction book I've read in a long time.  It's not a horror novel, but still incredibly scary.
 
2017-11-04 08:49:50 AM  
IT actually scared me while reading it the 1st time.  I was scared in broad daylight.

I just read 1922 and watched it on Netflix.  Really enjoyed them.
 
2017-11-04 08:55:54 AM  

Jake Havechek: King and in general, 11/22/63 is the best fiction book I've read in a long time.  It's not a horror novel, but still incredibly scary.


"Under the Dome" part 2, when the method lab blows, was some intense writing.

One of my single favorite King book scenarios is in "Wizard and Glass": the Mejican standoff in The Travellers Rest with the Big Coffin Hunters.

I could go for a few Cuthbert stories.
 
2017-11-04 09:00:23 AM  

ZAZ: Recoil Therapy

The original Stand was one of the books from the time when editors could make him cut material. Even though it's big it could have been bigger. Later, it was bigger.


Seriously? Holy crap (obviously read it a looong time ago)

/although to be fair would be kind of hard to tell a story about people from all over the county gathering together in two locations without tracking a bunch of them on their journey there.  Not if you wanted people to actually give a crap about any of the characters anyway.  Tom Clancy suffered from that too
 
2017-11-04 09:04:42 AM  

ZAZ: Recoil Therapy

The original Stand was one of the books from the time when editors could make him cut material. Even though it's big it could have been bigger. Later, it was bigger.


In the hard back version there was awesome artwork by Berni Wrightson.
 
2017-11-04 09:17:02 AM  
Oh also The Eyes of the Dragon was pretty good.
 
2017-11-04 09:35:02 AM  

Jake Havechek: King and in general, 11/22/63 is the best fiction book I've read in a long time.  It's not a horror novel, but still incredibly scary.


Have you read Time and Again - Finney?  It was better, and even King acknowledges his debt to the book.
 
2017-11-04 09:57:04 AM  
I'd kind of lost track of King until we were on a vacation a couple of years back, and I picked up "Full Dark No Stars" at an airport bookstore. Really enjoyed it.
 
2017-11-04 09:58:18 AM  

ZAZ: Recoil Therapy

The original Stand was one of the books from the time when editors could make him cut material. Even though it's big it could have been bigger. Later, it was bigger.


Yeah, I read the unabridged version. It could have been cut by half and still need editing.

First book of his I read and still my nostalgic favorite was Needful Things.
 
2017-11-04 10:04:04 AM  
Like RJReves I am also a Constant Reader.

He's the only author who's books I buy on the day of release and always have them done within a week.

My absolute favorite is Lisey's Story for personal reasons.
 
2017-11-04 10:14:35 AM  

HedlessChickn: Like RJReves I am also a Constant Reader.

He's the only author who's books I buy on the day of release and always have them done within a week.

My absolute favorite is Lisey's Story for personal reasons.


How's that constant reading working out for you when you don't know the difference between whose and who's?

Because I believe King would.
 
2017-11-04 10:16:33 AM  
As a teenager I was not much of a reader. I struggled finding something that I wouldn't get bored with. The first book I actually read, the kind of reading other people talked about was The Green Mile. I read it as the series of smaller books. I was 14 I think. I remember asking my dad to buy each one. I can't remember how long each one took but I remember days spent totally entrenched in a story and a place not mine. It was wild. I still have them all somewhere.

Now I go through waves where I'll read a bunch for a few month then not read for a long time.

Definitely though, The Green Mile changed my opinion on reading for the better. First book to do so!
 
2017-11-04 10:23:10 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: HedlessChickn: Like RJReves I am also a Constant Reader.

He's the only author who's books I buy on the day of release and always have them done within a week.

My absolute favorite is Lisey's Story for personal reasons.

How's that constant reading working out for you when you don't know the difference between whose and who's?

Because I believe King would.


Just woke up and haven't had my first cup of coffee.

Otherwise, it's working out just fine, thanks.
 
2017-11-04 10:27:52 AM  

HedlessChickn: ElizaDoolittle: HedlessChickn: Like RJReves I am also a Constant Reader.

He's the only author who's books I buy on the day of release and always have them done within a week.

My absolute favorite is Lisey's Story for personal reasons.

How's that constant reading working out for you when you don't know the difference between whose and who's?

Because I believe King would.

Just woke up and haven't had my first cup of coffee.

Otherwise, it's working out just fine, thanks.


Didn't notice who the poster was.  Sorry.
 
2017-11-04 10:33:25 AM  
My favorite King book is The Stand, the Unabridged version.  (It needs the Netflix/HBO Treatment)
Close second 11/22/63, and I just finished books 2 and 3 in the Mr. Mercedes trilogy.  Very good stories.  I will be interested to see how Audience converts the next two books to TV.

Speaking of Joe Hill, The Fireman SUCKED.  He really needed an editor to tell him to trim the sections down.  Each piece went on way too long.

We did love Horns, Heart Shaped Box, and NOS48U.
 
2017-11-04 10:39:48 AM  

BizarreMan: My favorite King book is The Stand, the Unabridged version.


That's also my favorite King book. However, considering the only other King book I read was the original version on The Stand, it's not much of a data set.
 
2017-11-04 10:41:38 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: Didn't notice who the poster was.  Sorry.


No harm, no foul.

Cheers!

Also, I have a signed End of Watch (Third book of the Hodges Trilogy)

It's the only time I've traveled to see an author, and it was a 3 hour trip.

I was in third row center because I showed up way early. By the time the talk started the hall was utterly packed.

There's nothing quite like it.
 
2017-11-04 10:45:22 AM  
11/22/63 is connected to the Dark Tower via It.  I think because Jake runs into Richie and Bev in Derry. The hole he passes through relocated later, and the Old Ones probably modified those holes into doors, eons later.  The Yellow Card man is a person chosen to be trained to monitor these doors by some powerful forces to try to prevent their potential misuse.
 
2017-11-04 10:51:25 AM  

HedlessChickn: ElizaDoolittle: Didn't notice who the poster was.  Sorry.

No harm, no foul.

Cheers!

Also, I have a signed End of Watch (Third book of the Hodges Trilogy)

It's the only time I've traveled to see an author, and it was a 3 hour trip.

I was in third row center because I showed up way early. By the time the talk started the hall was utterly packed.

There's nothing quite like it.


My wife and I saw him on the tour for 11/22/63 in New Orleans.  Price of admission was buy a hardbound book.  Out of 1,500 books distributed at the door, they had randomized in 300 signed ones.  My wife was one of the lucky 300.  It was so damn funny because I had looked and mine wasn't signed.  She's all "I'm not going to look, I'm not going to look."  She held out for maybe five minutes before her curiosity got the best of her and she looked.
 
2017-11-04 10:59:29 AM  
The Stand and The Dark Tower series, of course. The Stand was the first book I read by King, and I loved it. I got sucked into it, that first half and all the world building and destroying, and I was just floored. I think I read that over the course of 2-3 days, or something fairly ridiculous.

The most recent of his I've read is 11/22/63, which was amazing. I read it over 6 months ago, and I still think about it. The feelings it evokes at the end - melancholy, bittersweet - just really sticks with me. The choices Jake had to make.

Jake Havechek: 11/22/63 is connected to the Dark Tower via It.  I think because Jake runs into Richie and Bev in Derry. The hole he passes through relocated later, and the Old Ones probably modified those holes into doors, eons later.  The Yellow Card man is a person chosen to be trained to monitor these doors by some powerful forces to try to prevent their potential misuse.


I know I've heard most (all?) of his books are connected. And I think there are actual other books connecting all the worlds? I've never gone through that rabbit hole to see, but that is fascinating that it can all be connected.
 
2017-11-04 11:02:10 AM  
And of course, as an aspiring writer, his On Writing is wonderful as well. Just clean and down to earth, and something that I think any writer can relate to, even if it's not their style of writing there's something to learn.

One thing that struck me reading through On Writing it just how ordinary he is. He's had his ups and downs, but he still seems like a down to earth, genuinely good guy - to cliche, the one you'd like to have a beer with (if he drank).
 
2017-11-04 11:04:09 AM  

RadicalEd: I know I've heard most (all?) of his books are connected. And I think there are actual other books connecting all the worlds? I've never gone through that rabbit hole to see, but that is fascinating that it can all be connected.


The vast majority of all of his novels and a shiat ton of his short stories are connected to The Dark Tower series.
 
2017-11-04 11:07:49 AM  

RJReves: ElizaDoolittle: There's no debate that he is a very successful writer.  Seems to be almost branding it, though, with books written with one son, and promoting the other son's book at the same time.

The son bit seems a bit unfair. How many other writers get tweeted by SK?

I have read stuff by Joe. He is a fantastic writer in his own right.


Agreed.  Loved Heart Shaped Box.
 
2017-11-04 11:08:50 AM  
The last book of his that I read was Dreamcatcher.  I didn't enjoy it.
Then I saw the movie adaptation.  It was just....so....bad.
 
2017-11-04 11:10:31 AM  

basicstock: The last book of his that I read was Dreamcatcher.  I didn't enjoy it.
Then I saw the movie adaptation.  It was just....so....bad.


Even King hates that novel.

He wrote it while recovering from being hit by the van and was doped up.

As a side note, he wrote that one by hand.
 
2017-11-04 11:12:32 AM  

RJReves: I am Constant Reader.


I am  Constant Reader.
 
2017-11-04 11:13:20 AM  
King's short story The Long Walk is the one that I reread every couple of years.  One of his best.
 
2017-11-04 11:30:21 AM  

basicstock: The last book of his that I read was Dreamcatcher.  I didn't enjoy it.
Then I saw the movie adaptation.  It was just....so....bad.


I think we would be remiss if we don't discuss the screen adaptations of his works, which run the full spectrum from awesome (Shawshank, Green Mile, Misery, Dolores Claiborne) thru pretty good (Firestarter, Carrie, Salem's Lot) all the way down to absolutely terrible (Dreamcatcher, as you brought up, Cujo, which was a dog of a book and movie, The Gunslinger)
 
2017-11-04 11:33:03 AM  

ZAZ: I liked Tommyknockers, but I don't go around telling people to read it. I have always thought that a good editor could have turned Tommyknockers into a great SF horror novel. It was around the transition from good short fiction to editorless bloated bricks. I have a few of the late King bricks which I didn't finish or didn't start.


I also liked Tommyknockers, but lordy, it needed heavy editing to be great horror.
 
2017-11-04 11:34:32 AM  
Needful Things was the last King novel I've read.  It didn't feel nearly as bloated as some of his other stuff.  The Mist could have been cut down a bit.
 
2017-11-04 11:42:48 AM  
The one story that both freaked me out and hooked me as a young reader was Survivor Type. Monsters and ghosts and spooky clowns didn't phase me, but that story struck a nerve. The solitude, the desperate hunger... there's no fear like primal fear.
 
2017-11-04 11:45:56 AM  

Veda_Pierce: King's short story The Long Walk is the one that I reread every couple of years.  One of his best.


Ah yes, The Bachman Books.

Also contained "Rage", King's prescient school shooter story, and The Running Man, which was only vaguely related to the movie theoretically based upon it.
 
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