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(Vanity Fair)   You are never going to guess what Equifax was lobbying for right before they got hacked. No, not that, you perv. Gutting regulations, but I liked your idea better   ( vanityfair.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Equifax, credit-reporting agency Equifax, Law, Information security, Computer security, Security, Damages, Equifax shares  
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1661 clicks; posted to Politics » on 12 Sep 2017 at 5:04 PM (44 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-09-12 02:31:07 PM  
Of course they were.

In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.

If Arthur Andersen could end up being dismantled due to the irresponsibility of a portion of the business not taking proper precautions, then Equifax can be put down.  Make the other companies take security seriously.
 
2017-09-12 02:57:36 PM  
FTFA: Equifax told the Journal that its PAC contributions "are made in a legal, ethical, and transparent manner."

Bribery that is legal and transparent is still bribery, and neither its legality nor transparency makes it ethical.
 
2017-09-12 02:58:11 PM  
Equifax told the Journalthat its PAC contributions "are made in a legal, ethical, and transparent manner."

So they legally bribe Congress.  What else is knew?
 
2017-09-12 03:18:18 PM  

BizarreMan: Of course they were.

In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties horrific punishments.

If Arthur Andersen could end up being dismantled due to the irresponsibility of a portion of the business not taking proper precautions, then Equifax can be put down.  Make the other companies take security seriously.


Fixed the namby pamby part. Continue.
 
2017-09-12 03:27:06 PM  
Think we'll end up with a national ID system after it's all said and done? Because it's not just credit we have to worry about.

http://www.idtheftcenter.org/Identity-Theft/id-theft-leads-to-multipl​e​-arrests-of-an-innocent-man.html
 
2017-09-12 03:27:48 PM  
The Tossers - Political Scum
Youtube 6llob-YGEAw
 
2017-09-12 03:28:58 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-12 04:04:50 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Equifax told the Journalthat its PAC contributions "are made in a legal, ethical, and transparent manner."

So they legally bribe Congress.  What else is knew?


We no everything.
 
2017-09-12 04:04:51 PM  

Nadie_AZ: BizarreMan: Of course they were.

In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties horrific punishments.

If Arthur Andersen could end up being dismantled due to the irresponsibility of a portion of the business not taking proper precautions, then Equifax can be put down.  Make the other companies take security seriously.

Fixed the namby pamby part. Continue.


I will allow the substitution.  Because what you and I may consider substantial penalties, by the time the regulators got involved, would probably slightly less than what you or I would pay for a speeding ticket.
 
2017-09-12 05:07:09 PM  
The whole point of them voting for Trump was that he'd get rid of all those worthless regulations so corporations can fark us as hard as they want, without consent, and there's nothing we can do about it but cry.

So ... this is not surprising in the least.
 
2017-09-12 05:11:27 PM  
I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.
 
2017-09-12 05:11:45 PM  
Right before......
 
2017-09-12 05:11:47 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: The whole point of them voting for Trump was that he'd get rid of all those worthless regulations so corporations can fark us as hard as they want, without consent, and there's nothing we can do about it but cry.

So ... this is not surprising in the least.


Nope. Burn the f*ckers down.
 
2017-09-12 05:12:40 PM  
Subby, I find your lack of faith in your betters to be disturbing. Are you running a multi-billion dollar corporation? Didn't think so. They know what's best for them, and for you. Just leave them alone already.
 
2017-09-12 05:14:54 PM  

freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.


Even more shady, on the way home from work there was an Equifax ad that was basically "We f*cked up but now we'll offer you a 'dark web scan' for free if you sign up for our service to try to bribe you back."
 
2017-09-12 05:17:01 PM  

freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.


First I have heard of this.  As far as I know classic insiders at the exec level have to plan stock sales months in advance.
 
2017-09-12 05:17:51 PM  
Experian?  Was it Experian?
 
2017-09-12 05:18:59 PM  

freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.


Supposedly, the CFO had no idea there was a breach.

LOL, like anyone will believe him.
 
2017-09-12 05:20:26 PM  
I am shocked (shocked!) that my very own congress-critter was (is?) in the front pocket of Equifax.
 
2017-09-12 05:25:53 PM  
why is everyone in this god forsaken country so farking crooked and greedy?
can we start publicly caning and/or shaming these assholes?

America is great, it's the Americans you have to look out for.

bunch of farking dicks.
 
2017-09-12 05:31:11 PM  

Icarus_Rising: I am shocked (shocked!) that my very own congress-critter was (is?) in the front pocket of Equifax.


I think you are required under Fark rules to use this gif/jpeg whenever you are truly shocked.

media0.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2017-09-12 05:31:26 PM  
I know this has been beat to death, but it's still relevant:
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2017-09-12 05:32:31 PM  
They'll blame it all on that guy in IT whose breath always smells like tuna salad, rebrand themselves as Xafiuqe and the stock will be back above $140/share within six months.  What Xafiuqe!
 
2017-09-12 05:34:31 PM  
 
2017-09-12 05:39:40 PM  
There really needs to be a corporate death penalty.
 
2017-09-12 05:41:47 PM  

Snarfangel: There really needs to be a corporate death penalty.


I like it...if corporations are people, then corporations can be sentenced to capital punishment.
 
2017-09-12 05:46:25 PM  

A Cave Geek: Snarfangel: There really needs to be a corporate death penalty.

I like it...if corporations are people, then corporations can be sentenced to capital punishment.


What of those "captains of industry" that drove these corporations?
 
2017-09-12 05:50:51 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: A Cave Geek: I know this has been beat to death, but it's still relevant:
[i.pinimg.com image 736x736]

His cousin's still correct, as well:

[img.fark.net image 568x379]

"The royalists of the economic order have conceded that political freedom was the business of the Government, but they have maintained that economic slavery was nobody's business. They granted that the Government could protect the citizen in his right to vote, but they denied that the Government could do anything to protect the citizen in his right to work and his right to live.

Today we stand committed to the proposition that freedom is no half-and-half affair. If the average citizen is guaranteed equal opportunity in the polling place, he must have equal opportunity in the market place."


Now we have this guy.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-12 05:59:40 PM  

grumpfuff: freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.

Even more shady, on the way home from work there was an Equifax ad that was basically "We f*cked up but now we'll offer you a 'dark web scan' for free if you sign up for our service to try to bribe you back."


Equifax sets up their 143,000,000 victims with free one year trials of Equifax TrustID after which they have 143,000,000 existing customers they can auto-renew and/or spam to BUY more Equifax services.

Imagine,  "Don't want your Equifax protection to expire!  Equifax could give away your data again!"
or "Nice information we have on you. Be a shame if something else was to happen with it."

I actually paid Equifax the $10 fee - with a new credit card number! - to freeze my Equifax records.

Equifax will come out if this smelling like a rose, after they give some execs golden parachutes and can a crew of IT staff - the staff that was ignored every time they asked for new security systems.
 
2017-09-12 06:00:01 PM  
Another day, another farking over of the country by a corporation that will suffer minimal consequences at best.
 
2017-09-12 06:02:35 PM  

mcreadyblue: freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.

Supposedly, the CFO had no idea there was a breach.

LOL, like anyone will believe him.


Want a read that will make laugh, cry and cause your brain to seek to escape out of your eyeballs?

Why insider trading should be legal

"Who is the victim? Well, you might think: I am. I just lost all or most of the money I had put on the stock. But I should be thanking the guy who sold me his shares. How come? Well, I wanted to buy that stock anyway. If he hadn't come along and sold those shares to me, I would have paid a higher price. If I paid more for the stock, I would have lost more money. That's common sense. The more insiders selling me shares of the fraud, the less I would lose."
 
2017-09-12 06:02:49 PM  

Snarfangel: There really needs to be a corporate death penalty.


There was. As above Arthur Anderson was dead inside of 3 months after Enron.

In this case, unless consumers boycott lenders that use Equifax and the banks drop them, there's not going to be any pressure on Equifax.
 
2017-09-12 06:02:53 PM  
So I just thought of something, and someone please tell me I'm a moron.

One of the things I've heard you can do about this is freeze your credit report.  Then someone won't be able to take out a loan or get a credit card in your name until you unfreeze it.  But what do you need to prove your identity to unfreeze your credit?  Your name, address, date of birth, and social security number.

And what was the information that got stolen?  Your name, address, date of birth, and social secgoddamnit!

But here's the silver lining: at least one of those bits of information you can change.  Your name, DOB, and SSN might be traded around the criminal underworld until decades after you're dead, but at least you can protect yourself by selling your house.

Oh, and freezing & unfreezing your credit isn't free in most states.  I'm having a hard time coming up with a more extortion like racket than credit reporting companies short of the actual mob.
 
2017-09-12 06:05:37 PM  

freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.


Especially since at that level you have to file notice of intent to sell stock long before you actually sell it.  So unless they can come up with a copy of the memo they sent to the SEC, it's a pretty cut-and-dried case which I'm sure will end up with them getting more than a slap on the wrist.

Although probably not as much as an indian burn.
 
2017-09-12 06:07:10 PM  

mcreadyblue: freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.

Supposedly, the CFO had no idea there was a breach.

LOL, like anyone will believe him.


CASINO(1995) ACE FIRES IDIOT COWBOY
Youtube JcZHSGyos6g
 
2017-09-12 06:29:05 PM  

netringer: grumpfuff: freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.

Even more shady, on the way home from work there was an Equifax ad that was basically "We f*cked up but now we'll offer you a 'dark web scan' for free if you sign up for our service to try to bribe you back."

Equifax sets up their 143,000,000 victims with free one year trials of Equifax TrustID after which they have 143,000,000 existing customers they can auto-renew and/or spam to BUY more Equifax services.

Imagine,  "Don't want your Equifax protection to expire!  Equifax could give away your data again!"
or "Nice information we have on you. Be a shame if something else was to happen with it."

I actually paid Equifax the $10 fee - with a new credit card number! - to freeze my Equifax records.

Equifax will come out if this smelling like a rose, after they give some execs golden parachutes and can a crew of IT staff - the staff that was ignored every time they asked for new security systems.


Oh, I wasn't for a second implying they'd be punished for this f*ck up.
 
2017-09-12 06:30:00 PM  

Nadie_AZ: A Cave Geek: Snarfangel: There really needs to be a corporate death penalty.

I like it...if corporations are people, then corporations can be sentenced to capital punishment.

What of those "captains of industry" that drove these corporations?


They can go down with the ship.
 
2017-09-12 06:37:05 PM  
Karac:
Oh, and freezing & unfreezing your credit isn't free in most states.  I'm having a hard time coming up with a more extortion like racket than credit reporting companies short of the actual mob.

Almost like it was designed that way ...
 
2017-09-12 06:47:09 PM  
 
2017-09-12 07:05:24 PM  
Domino effect:

In my gmail spambox, I'm receiving phishing pitches based on the Equifax breach.

"Just enter your information, we'll tell you if you're safe or at risk from the Equifax incident! Trust us!" -- written with less discernable grammar, of course.
 
2017-09-12 07:16:05 PM  
"Oh, your credit score is now 200?  Sorry, 'bout that!  If you write 50 letters stating your case to us and every other credit reporting agency, keep your nose clean, and subscribe to our special service, it'll likely be restored during your lifetime.  Is there anything else I can help you with?"
 
2017-09-12 07:40:57 PM  

BizarreMan: In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.


I think negligence at this level should be a capital offense.  Shoot the farkers and televise it as an example to others.  That's the only solution that prevents this from happening again.
 
2017-09-12 07:45:36 PM  

bk3k: BizarreMan: In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.

I think negligence at this level should be a capital offense.  Shoot the farkers and televise it as an example to others.  That's the only solution that prevents this from happening again.


Punishment scaled by cumulative impact on society?
 
2017-09-12 08:18:35 PM  

scanman61: Punishment scaled by cumulative impact on society?


Yes that's exactly how it should be from the start.

netringer: In this case, unless consumers boycott lenders that use Equifax and the banks drop them, there's not going to be any pressure on Equifax.


The best you can hope for is they just set up shop under another corporate shell.  They can just start up a new company(owned by the same people as the old company), and "sell" their business assets(including data) to the "new" company.  Thus they've escaped all liability (in every form).

And the great thing about sociopaths is they don't give a fark about the damage they cause to others.  They care more about the golf games they miss as a result of these events.  This is nothing but an inconvenience to them.  There is no incentive for them - or the next Equifax - to be less belligerently negligent.
 
2017-09-12 08:23:51 PM  

bk3k: BizarreMan: In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.

I think negligence at this level should be a capital offense.  Shoot the farkers and televise it as an example to others.  That's the only solution that prevents this from happening again.


Or a Michael Fay-style ass-caning.
 
2017-09-12 08:34:30 PM  

Bith Set Me Up: bk3k: BizarreMan: In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.

I think negligence at this level should be a capital offense.  Shoot the farkers and televise it as an example to others.  That's the only solution that prevents this from happening again.

Or a Michael Fay-style ass-caning.


Might be a good opening act.  Run some Superbowl style ads in between that and the main event.
 
2017-09-12 08:41:44 PM  

scanman61: bk3k: BizarreMan: In my opinion, if you're going out there and intentionally grabbing all of that sweet data about people and fail to protect it then there needs to be substantial penalties.

I think negligence at this level should be a capital offense.  Shoot the farkers and televise it as an example to others.  That's the only solution that prevents this from happening again.

Punishment scaled by cumulative impact on society?


No need to change the laws to anything so dramatic.
Just make make their sentences run consecutively.  Do that and the individual sentence doesn't even have to be a felony; any old misdemeanor would do.

How many years would a single hour per person effected come out to equal?
 
2017-09-12 08:44:31 PM  

netringer: grumpfuff: freetomato: I'm no expert, but those executives selling their stock right the SHTF seems mighty "insider tradey" to me.

Even more shady, on the way home from work there was an Equifax ad that was basically "We f*cked up but now we'll offer you a 'dark web scan' for free if you sign up for our service to try to bribe you back."

Equifax sets up their 143,000,000 victims with free one year trials of Equifax TrustID after which they have 143,000,000 existing customers they can auto-renew and/or spam to BUY more Equifax services.

Imagine,  "Don't want your Equifax protection to expire!  Equifax could give away your data again!"
or "Nice information we have on you. Be a shame if something else was to happen with it."

I actually paid Equifax the $10 fee - with a new credit card number! - to freeze my Equifax records.

Equifax will come out if this smelling like a rose, after they give some execs golden parachutes and can a crew of IT staff - the staff that was ignored every time they asked for new security systems.


There are already several Class Action suits filed against Equifax for this specific breach. Their shareholders will get boned, but you're right that the Board will probably get a slap on the wrist.
 
2017-09-12 10:11:27 PM  
I'm never surprised that Congress is bought and paid for.  I'm just always surprised as to how cheaply they are bought.
 
2017-09-12 10:12:28 PM  
Ok, honey? Where's my gun?
 
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