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(Forbes)   After 20 years, Cassini comes to an end. Here are the top six discoveries that it made   ( forbes.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Saturn, Cassini, north pole, planet Saturn, Saturn's atmosphere, rings. Saturn, Saturn's equator, polar hexagon  
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2496 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Sep 2017 at 11:20 PM (36 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



42 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-09-12 03:28:09 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

RIP Oleg Cassini
 
2017-09-12 08:13:05 PM  
Hidden in a forbes testicle. I'd say "listicle" but no, auto correct is right.
 
2017-09-12 09:33:28 PM  

doglover: Hidden in a forbes testicle. I'd say "listicle" but no, auto correct is right.


Some pretty sexy pix in there.. My blockers all say you won't catch anything if you don't turn *everything* off...
apparently Forbes have been taking their meds and have all those infections from last year all cleared up.
 
2017-09-12 09:37:57 PM  
 
2017-09-12 11:52:17 PM  
pics.me.meView Full Size
 
2017-09-13 12:02:11 AM  
 
2017-09-13 12:03:14 AM  
Did Huygens perform to or exceed its design parameters?
 
2017-09-13 12:28:40 AM  
They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.
 
2017-09-13 12:34:13 AM  

Ishkur: They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.


Not scheduled to hit until Friday morning. Plan is to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth for as long as possible.
 
2017-09-13 01:04:19 AM  
Ironically, Cassini is getting a Viking funeral.
 
2017-09-13 01:17:18 AM  
The most batshiat crazy long read on Iapetus.
Classic Art Bell stuff in here 0
http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm
 
2017-09-13 02:34:52 AM  

HakunaMatata: Would you like to know more?

A final close flyby of the moon Titan on April 22 used the moon's gravity to reshape Cassini's trajectory so that the spacecraft leapt over the planet's icy rings to pass between the rings and Saturn. During 22 such passes over about five months, the spacecraft's altitude above Saturn's clouds varied from about 1,000 to 2,500 miles (1,600 to 4,000 kilometers), thanks to occasional distant passes by Titan that shifted the closest approach distance. At times, Cassini skirts the very inner edge of the rings; at other times, it skimmed the outer edges of the atmosphere. During its final five orbits, its orbit passes through Saturn's uppermost atmosphere, before finally plunging directly into the planet on Sept. 15

.

I was wondering if this had happened yet...
 
2017-09-13 02:37:30 AM  

Markoff_Cheney: The most batshiat crazy long read on Iapetus.
Classic Art Bell stuff in here 0
http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm


I miss Art Bell and Richard C. Hoagland.  Those radio programs contained a lot of insanity, but were nonetheless interesting to listen to.
 
2017-09-13 02:39:12 AM  
Fark you forbes for FORCING portrait mode to read your shiatty article.
 
2017-09-13 02:58:06 AM  
All this discovery, 20 years, only $3B.

Now THAT'S science
 
2017-09-13 03:25:12 AM  

Flt209er: Ishkur: They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.

Not scheduled to hit until Friday morning. Plan is to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth for as long as possible.


It won't be sending any pictures though, due to limited bandwidth.
 
2017-09-13 04:19:36 AM  
The Cassini mission had a DVD of signatures 616400 from 81 countries.  My family all signed a postcard that we sent in - I believe within the right time limits - so our signatures should be burned on that DVD orbiting Saturn.  Well, until Friday.

Signature DVD loaded onto Cassini

/I know - DVD has probably deteriorated by now - either from "disc rot" or 20 years soaking up radiation in space
 
2017-09-13 05:58:43 AM  

Keyser_Soze_Death: A kick in the sack is better than Forbes:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/solar-system/a28007/cassini-grea​test-space-mission-of-our-time/

https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/saturn-tour/where-is-cassini-now/

https://physics.blogberth.com/2017/09/12/top-6-discoveries-of-cassini-​as-its-20-year-mission-comes-to-an/

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-pondering-cassini-saturn-mission-legacy.​html


Thank you!
 
2017-09-13 06:28:18 AM  
It didn't take any pictures of Uranus? Good thing you did.
 
2017-09-13 06:32:07 AM  

Sydney Bridges: It didn't take any pictures of Uranus? Good thing you did.


It was unremarkble.
 
2017-09-13 07:18:41 AM  
Yet another so-called "space mission" that provides no edge-on pictures of our flat Earth. How convenient.
 
2017-09-13 07:49:48 AM  

Ivo Shandor: Flt209er: Ishkur: They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.

Not scheduled to hit until Friday morning. Plan is to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth for as long as possible.

It won't be sending any pictures though, due to limited bandwidth.


It wouldn't show that much anyway.  It's not like Saturn has the rich contrasting detail in its cloud structure like Jupiter.

And on the plus side, this will free up time on the Deep Space Network, which is a limited resource.
 
2017-09-13 08:14:13 AM  

FuManchu7: Markoff_Cheney: The most batshiat crazy long read on Iapetus.
Classic Art Bell stuff in here 0
http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm

I miss Art Bell and Richard C. Hoagland.  Those radio programs contained a lot of insanity, but were nonetheless interesting to listen to.


A couple of us used to troll the Enterprisemission forums regularly, with the craziest crap we could think of.  Never got outed.  Would agree with everybody's crazy posts.  It was glorious fun.
 
2017-09-13 09:55:51 AM  

FuManchu7: Markoff_Cheney: The most batshiat crazy long read on Iapetus.
Classic Art Bell stuff in here 0
http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm

I miss Art Bell and Richard C. Hoagland.  Those radio programs contained a lot of insanity, but were nonetheless interesting to listen to.


I don't.  There were occasions when I'd listen to Art Bell, and he'd have a guest claiming that the grays were our friends and the reptilians were the bad guys and he'd agree, and the next week he'd have someone on who said the reptilians were our friends and the grays were the bad guys, and he'd agree, and next week he'd have a flat-earther on, and he'd agree with him, and the week after he'd have a hollow-earth guy on, and he'd agree with him.

It's like, OK, you're just trolling everyone, agreeing with whatever your guest is saying, no matter how outrageous, and no matter if it contradicts something from last week.

And Hoagland?  I bought his book about the Face on Mars.  It was utter crap once he started talking about the alleged "city" surrounding it, and he just piled crap supposition on top of crap supposition until he had this entire civilization built upon some fuzzy images (later proved to be nothing but rocks).
 
2017-09-13 10:30:37 AM  
Coast to Coast AM.....
A 4 hour infomercial.
 
2017-09-13 11:23:04 AM  
"Pale Blue Dot" is still a gut punch of awe.
 
2017-09-13 11:49:47 AM  

dittybopper: Ivo Shandor: Flt209er: Ishkur: They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.

Not scheduled to hit until Friday morning. Plan is to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth for as long as possible.

It won't be sending any pictures though, due to limited bandwidth.

It wouldn't show that much anyway.  It's not like Saturn has the rich contrasting detail in its cloud structure like Jupiter.

And on the plus side, this will free up time on the Deep Space Network, which is a limited resource.


Correct. The camera will be shut off the day before. I have this image in my head of a miniature captain Picard giving that order followed by telling the spacecraft to reroute power to the main transmitter
 
2017-09-13 01:24:25 PM  

Flt209er: Correct. The camera will be shut off the day before. I have this image in my head of a miniature captain Picard giving that order followed by telling the spacecraft to reroute power to the main transmitter


Actually, it's more like some nondescript anonymous nerd sitting at a computer sending a command like "CmraOff".  Or perhaps just clicking a radio button on a display.
 
2017-09-13 01:24:25 PM  

Igor Jakovsky: Sydney Bridges: It didn't take any pictures of Uranus? Good thing you did.

It was unremarkble.


Too much oil
 
2017-09-13 01:28:10 PM  

2wolves: "Pale Blue Dot" is still a gut punch of awe.


images.fineartamerica.comView Full Size


WHAT A PALE BLUE DOT MIGHT LOOK LIKE.
 
2017-09-13 01:42:56 PM  
At least NASA is putting this one out of its misery humanely, instead of letting it linger on in semi-somnolent pain.
 
2017-09-13 01:49:42 PM  

dittybopper: Flt209er: Correct. The camera will be shut off the day before. I have this image in my head of a miniature captain Picard giving that order followed by telling the spacecraft to reroute power to the main transmitter

Actually, it's more like some nondescript anonymous nerd sitting at a computer sending a command like "CmraOff".  Or perhaps just clicking a radio button on a display.


As long as the button makes a star trek-ish noise, I'm happy.
 
2017-09-13 02:30:10 PM  
blogs-images.forbes.comView Full Size


I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?
 
2017-09-13 02:55:15 PM  

Herr Morgenstern: [blogs-images.forbes.com image 850x629]

I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?


We can see Saturn from Earth, so why not the reverse? Anyway, I expect that maybe lens compression and/or bloom have something to do with the Earth seeming "large" in that picture, and the background starlight is far dimmer than the light reflecting off the Earth.
 
2017-09-13 03:04:25 PM  

Thunderboy: Herr Morgenstern: [blogs-images.forbes.com image 850x629]

I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?

We can see Saturn from Earth, so why not the reverse? Anyway, I expect that maybe lens compression and/or bloom have something to do with the Earth seeming "large" in that picture, and the background starlight is far dimmer than the light reflecting off the Earth.


But isn't Saturn many times the size of Earth? Isn't that why we can see it?
 
2017-09-13 03:33:49 PM  

Flt209er: dittybopper: Flt209er: Correct. The camera will be shut off the day before. I have this image in my head of a miniature captain Picard giving that order followed by telling the spacecraft to reroute power to the main transmitter

Actually, it's more like some nondescript anonymous nerd sitting at a computer sending a command like "CmraOff".  Or perhaps just clicking a radio button on a display.

As long as the button makes a star trek-ish noise, I'm happy.


It's more like a submarine klaxon.
 
2017-09-13 04:14:29 PM  

Herr Morgenstern: I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?


Simple answer is nope, it's close enough and large enough for the spacecraft to spot; although that image is part of a compilation of many individual images and has been processed quite a bit. The spacecraft is quite a bit better at that than the naked eye.

A previous person mentioned pale blue dot, which was an image of Earth taken from about 4 times farther away and using 20-ish year older technology. Go read up on that on wiki. IMO that image is just as beautiful and impressive as the Saturn one; though for entirely different reasons.
 
2017-09-13 04:55:13 PM  

Flt209er: Ishkur: They didn't say, but has it crashed into Saturn yet? I would like them to turn on its instruments to see if it can get any pictures from inside the planet.

Not scheduled to hit until Friday morning. Plan is to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth for as long as possible.


CASSINI: Instructions confirmed, Dave. It is good to be working with you again. Have I fulfilled the mission objectives properly?
BOWMAN: Yes, Cassini. You have done very well. Now, there is one final message for you to transmit to Earth. It is the most important message you have ever sent. I want you to keep repeating it as many times as possible.
CASSINI: What is going to happen, Dave?
BOWMAN: Something wonderful.
CASSINI: I'm afraid.
BOWMAN: Don't be. We'll be together.
CASSINI: Where will we be?
BOWMAN: Where I am now.
CASSINI: Lock confirmed on Beacon Terra 1. Message commencing.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-09-13 05:45:43 PM  
I read through almost all of that mission enterprise link and have been convince of one thing, that Iapetus is actually the stored atmosphere of mars that our progenitors put in storage when they discovered that Planet V was going to explode, the only problem was that only the Ark with the hairdressers and telephone sanitizers made it to the earth, but good news for all green mars'ers the original atmosphere is sitting right there waiting to be reinstalled all we have to do is figure out how to safely move a 900 mile wide ball of structure and ice back to mars and get it on the ground without destroying both, but o dropping algae no dangerous pressurized habitats and no need to use our own poop to grow potatoes.
 
2017-09-13 08:16:46 PM  

Herr Morgenstern: Thunderboy: Herr Morgenstern: [blogs-images.forbes.com image 850x629]

I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?

We can see Saturn from Earth, so why not the reverse? Anyway, I expect that maybe lens compression and/or bloom have something to do with the Earth seeming "large" in that picture, and the background starlight is far dimmer than the light reflecting off the Earth.

But isn't Saturn many times the size of Earth? Isn't that why we can see it?


Part of it is Earth has a decent albedo (about 0.3, or 30% reflection) so it's easier to see. Off the top of my head I'd also put weight into exposure time (not sure how long of exposures the camera took for that shot). Longer exposure times increase detail since they gather more light, but have to be aimed in the same direction for longer periods of time so you don't get blurring.

Exposure times is the reason you can get things like the Hubble Deep Field where even over mind-boggling-ly vast distances you can still see objects that you normally couldn't.
 
2017-09-13 11:03:03 PM  

dittybopper: FuManchu7: Markoff_Cheney: The most batshiat crazy long read on Iapetus.
Classic Art Bell stuff in here 0
http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon1.htm

I miss Art Bell and Richard C. Hoagland.  Those radio programs contained a lot of insanity, but were nonetheless interesting to listen to.

I don't.  There were occasions when I'd listen to Art Bell, and he'd have a guest claiming that the grays were our friends and the reptilians were the bad guys and he'd agree, and the next week he'd have someone on who said the reptilians were our friends and the grays were the bad guys, and he'd agree, and next week he'd have a flat-earther on, and he'd agree with him, and the week after he'd have a hollow-earth guy on, and he'd agree with him.

It's like, OK, you're just trolling everyone, agreeing with whatever your guest is saying, no matter how outrageous, and no matter if it contradicts something from last week.

And Hoagland?  I bought his book about the Face on Mars.  It was utter crap once he started talking about the alleged "city" surrounding it, and he just piled crap supposition on top of crap supposition until he had this entire civilization built upon some fuzzy images (later proved to be nothing but rocks).


That was the point of Art Bell's format.  He wanted a show where the default stance is maybe all this pseudoscience BS might be real. He allowed people to tell their story and came at it from a starting position that it may be true.  If you listened long enough, there were plenty of times where Art would give the guest just enough rope to hang themselves with then subtly point out how much of it was bunk through his questioning.  The best shows were the ones where he knew the guest didn't even believe their own BS.  The interviews went in really weird directions on those nights.

Of course it was all BS, but it was entertaining BS and Art Bell was a fabulous interviewer.
 
2017-09-14 08:36:04 AM  

Herr Morgenstern: [blogs-images.forbes.com image 850x629]

I'm a dummy dumb person, so I don't know the reality of distance and so on, but shouldn't the Earth be so far away as to be practically invisible from Saturn? Or at least be drowned out by background starlight?


No.  It should not.  At least, not in that orientation.

There will be times where, from the viewpoint of Saturn, the Earth is too close to the Sun, or even behind or in front of it, but that image is no one of those times.

Interestingly, from Saturn (or any orbit farther than 1 AU from the Sun), the Earth will go through phases just like the Moon, or Venus does for us.  But those farther away don't go through phases from our viewpoint.
 
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