Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Guy)   Programmers: Is your code ethical?   (medium.freecodecamp.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Pharmacology, Drugs, Drug, Prescription drug, Off-label use, Over-the-counter drug  
•       •       •

1700 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 22 Nov 2016 at 5:08 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2016-11-22 3:47:04 PM  
That's not unethical.  You did what the requirements told you to do.  Unethical would be purposely coding bugs into your software to harm the company or people or to make yourself look like a hero when you fix the bug.

This is more a morality thing - ex. if can't reconcile coding the logic for the cruise missile because it will kill people, then don't do it.
 
2016-11-22 4:23:44 PM  
I dunno, everytime I try to #include <ethics.h>, Microsoft Visual Studio crashes on me.
 
2016-11-22 4:32:41 PM  
Is any work anyone does perfectly "ethical" or "moral" when you take into account the entirety of the ethics and morality of the company you're working for?  Unless you work on your own, most likely no.  Most likely the company you work for is doing things that runs afoul of your ethics and morality.

I'm not going to pinpoint what is and is not ethical or moral, or which companies are more ethical or moral... just saying... you have a job.  Most likely with a company with very complex ethical and moral issues.

It's part of capitalism.

But you have to eat.

If what you're doing is ILLEGAL and you know it, then we're talking about something totally different.

But please... you're given something to code, you code it, you get paid, that's all you're responsible for.  This dude isn't responsible for the suicide of the girl mentioned in the article, and he shouldn't feel such.

He wrote a quiz application.  In code.  Got paid.  Forget about the rest, let the company deal with those issues.
 
2016-11-22 4:49:14 PM  
Dolla dolla bills, y'all!
 
2016-11-22 4:51:57 PM  
Are you working for a drug company?  If yes, you check your ethics at the door.
 
2016-11-22 5:15:00 PM  

UberDave: That's not unethical.


I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.
 
2016-11-22 5:24:05 PM  
I don't see my how my evil plans are helped by "ethics".
 
2016-11-22 5:34:55 PM  

palladiate: UberDave: That's not unethical.

I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.


I don't see where the coder knew of the side effects before hand. Are you arguing that a coder know all about the practices and products of the company employing him/her?
 
2016-11-22 5:41:03 PM  
That's why we outsource that sort of coding.
 
2016-11-22 5:45:14 PM  
No, but it's organic and free range.
 
2016-11-22 5:48:42 PM  
What he describes is absolutely an ethical issue, and it's a good example of why most professional societies have formal codes of ethics (though whether they follow them or not is a separate matter). If you can't see the ethical problems in the client's request, whether or not the side effects were known to the coder or the client, then whoever was in charge of your moral education has failed you badly.
 
2016-11-22 5:51:41 PM  

simplicimus: palladiate: UberDave: That's not unethical.

I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.

I don't see where the coder knew of the side effects before hand. Are you arguing that a coder know all about the practices and products of the company employing him/her?


He absolutely should have seen that the site misrepresented itself. It's obvious and he admits to noting that it seemed like sleazy marketing. I'm not saying it was the drug that made it unethical, it was the misrepresentation as to the site's nature and the quiz's answer pushing.

This is why the largest companies in the world have Ethics officers, ombudsmen, and spend millions on ethics training and compliance. This might be me being a corporate apologist here, but most major orgs don't aim to be unethical, and don't tolerate it if this sort of behavior is reported up to compliance.

If I were to develop a solution for our marketing that was designed to be confusing as to the sponsor of it, I would get reprimanded at least. The marketing genius in charge would absolutely get fired. I've seen it happen, and at one of the most disliked companies in the world.
 
2016-11-22 5:54:10 PM  
Take a page from this fellow's book. . .

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2016-11-22 5:54:35 PM  
My code favours fizzes over buzzes, is that wrong? Should I not have done that?

/As a part of a workshop we had to make a program to manage a shop
//So we invented a company that sold second hand exotic animals (used to belong to an old lady)
///Then in the next workshop we had to make it a website and add user functionality so people could place and view orders
////Because we already had the animals we branched out to exotic food and fur
 
2016-11-22 5:58:38 PM  
The ethics are not with the programmer. I assume there was no way to get the drug except though a doctor so getting people to ask a professional about drug X is not unethical, it is marketing. No different than "What kind of Chevy Volt are you?" except there is nothing to stop you from getting a Volt if you fall for it.

Even if that weren't the case, who uses an online quiz for drug advice? For any advice more serious than what Sex In The City character you are.
 
2016-11-22 6:11:35 PM  
Sure, it's an ethical question for the developer.  He was told it was a general info website...so as soon as he knew that any question branch led to a specific drug sold by the same company that paid him, it was a moral decision he had to make to continue with that project.  Not saying I would have chosen any differently, at that stage in the game...but he knew what was going on at that point.
 
2016-11-22 6:24:01 PM  

CommonName2: The ethics are not with the programmer. I assume there was no way to get the drug except though a doctor so getting people to ask a professional about drug X is not unethical, it is marketing. No different than "What kind of Chevy Volt are you?" except there is nothing to stop you from getting a Volt if you fall for it.

Even if that weren't the case, who uses an online quiz for drug advice? For any advice more serious than what Sex In The City character you are.


Exactly. All advertising, short of "Here is product X. It does Y." (When it does actually do Y) - Is lying to some degree or another. Outside of an outright illegality, if people are too stupid to understand that - it's ultimately on them.

We should never forget every single thing in our media is designed to manipulate us. Sometimes it's for entertainment, other times it's to get us to do things; but it is always designed to part you from your money. You think it's a coincidence the first image you see in boner pill ads is a gorgeous woman?

Doritos are fun and lead to whimsical fun! Not to obesity and feeling bloated and gross because you just ate the whole bag without thinking.
 
2016-11-22 6:31:03 PM  
In this situation I'm hard pressed to say if I'd do much differently.

The best I generally try to do is if I identify something obviously stupid is state "We all realize that if we do X, Y has a very high likelihood of happening correct?" followed by me saying "I like to make sure if we make a bad decision we intend to make it on purpose and not by accident."
 
2016-11-22 6:37:27 PM  
Yes it is/was unethical but most and I mean most everything we do can in some form or another be described as unethical from someone else's point of view. We just have to pick the battles we fight.
 
2016-11-22 6:47:52 PM  

palladiate: This is why the largest companies in the world have Ethics officers, ombudsmen, and spend millions on ethics training and compliance. This might be me being a corporate apologist here, but most major orgs don't aim to be unethical, and don't tolerate it if this sort of behavior is reported up to compliance.


OK, I wouldn't know about that. All my coding was internal to the companies, nothing outward facing. And in this instance, working for a drug company should have indicated the "ethics" involved. A rigged quiz is not unexpected. But this approaches "Damn it Jim, I'm a coder, not a Doctor!"
 
2016-11-22 7:16:27 PM  

Lochsteppe: What he describes is absolutely an ethical issue, and it's a good example of why most professional societies have formal codes of ethics (though whether they follow them or not is a separate matter). If you can't see the ethical problems in the client's request, whether or not the side effects were known to the coder or the client, then whoever was in charge of your moral education has failed you badly.


Maybe the quiz just asked the right questions.
 
2016-11-22 7:20:20 PM  

palladiate: simplicimus: palladiate: UberDave: That's not unethical.

I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.

I don't see where the coder knew of the side effects before hand. Are you arguing that a coder know all about the practices and products of the company employing him/her?

He absolutely should have seen that the site misrepresented itself. It's obvious and he admits to noting that it seemed like sleazy marketing. I'm not saying it was the drug that made it unethical, it was the misrepresentation as to the site's nature and the quiz's answer pushing.

This is why the largest companies in the world have Ethics officers, ombudsmen, and spend millions on ethics training and compliance. This might be me being a corporate apologist here, but most major orgs don't aim to be unethical, and don't tolerate it if this sort of behavior is reported up to compliance.

If I were to develop a solution for our marketing that was designed to be confusing as to the sponsor of it, I would get reprimanded at least. The marketing genius in charge would absolutely get fired. I've seen it happen, and at one of the most disliked companies in the world.


The only "ethics officer" I've ever known existed to prove that management was without fault and never ordered unethical behavior (however willing they were to fire ethical behavior that might not complete the contract).  The engineers were expected to meet the contract by ethical means, whether it existed or not.  When you left the company, the most important item you *had* to hand over was the ethics handbook.  Presumably the above was spelled out a little to carefully in the handbook.
 
2016-11-22 7:29:47 PM  

CommonName2: The ethics are not with the programmer. I assume there was no way to get the drug except though a doctor so getting people to ask a professional about drug X is not unethical, it is marketing. No different than "What kind of Chevy Volt are you?" except there is nothing to stop you from getting a Volt if you fall for it.

Even if that weren't the case, who uses an online quiz for drug advice? For any advice more serious than what Sex In The City character you are.


Naive teenagers who don't know any better?
 
2016-11-22 7:41:43 PM  
I've got code in the D5 nuclear missile, the Abrams tank, and the Seawolf submarine sonar system.  Had a clearance for all of em.  Nope, I don't feel the least bit guilty about it.  The job paid well, the work was interesting, my co-workers were great.
 
2016-11-22 7:45:39 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: palladiate: simplicimus: palladiate: UberDave: That's not unethical.

I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.

I don't see where the coder knew of the side effects before hand. Are you arguing that a coder know all about the practices and products of the company employing him/her?

He absolutely should have seen that the site misrepresented itself. It's obvious and he admits to noting that it seemed like sleazy marketing. I'm not saying it was the drug that made it unethical, it was the misrepresentation as to the site's nature and the quiz's answer pushing.

This is why the largest companies in the world have Ethics officers, ombudsmen, and spend millions on ethics training and compliance. This might be me being a corporate apologist here, but most major orgs don't aim to be unethical, and don't tolerate it if this sort of behavior is reported up to compliance.

If I were to develop a solution for our marketing that was designed to be confusing as to the sponsor of it, I would get reprimanded at least. The marketing genius in charge would absolutely get fired. I've seen it happen, and at one of the most disliked companies in the world.

The only "ethics officer" I've ever known existed to prove that management was without fault and never ordered unethical behavior (however willing they were to fire ethical behavior that might not complete the contract).  The engineers were expected to meet the contract by ethical means, whether it existed or not.  When you left the company, the most important item you *had* to hand over was the ethics handbook.  Presumably the above was spelled out a little to carefully in the handbook.


Ouch, did you work for Wells Fargo?
 
2016-11-22 7:50:42 PM  
I've written much code for minicomputers, all of it non-PC.
 
2016-11-22 8:04:54 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


While 1 {
While party.on { party.down }
sleep 1000
While !party.on { KillAllHumans() }
}

/looks ethical to me
//besides, someone has to bend girders and I ain't doing it
///According to my calculations, this robot will qualify for a boat loan.
 
2016-11-22 8:10:13 PM  

Boudyro: CommonName2: The ethics are not with the programmer. I assume there was no way to get the drug except though a doctor so getting people to ask a professional about drug X is not unethical, it is marketing. No different than "What kind of Chevy Volt are you?" except there is nothing to stop you from getting a Volt if you fall for it.

Even if that weren't the case, who uses an online quiz for drug advice? For any advice more serious than what Sex In The City character you are.

Exactly. All advertising, short of "Here is product X. It does Y." (When it does actually do Y) - Is lying to some degree or another. Outside of an outright illegality, if people are too stupid to understand that - it's ultimately on them.

We should never forget every single thing in our media is designed to manipulate us. Sometimes it's for entertainment, other times it's to get us to do things; but it is always designed to part you from your money. You think it's a coincidence the first image you see in boner pill ads is a gorgeous woman?

Doritos are fun and lead to whimsical fun! Not to obesity and feeling bloated and gross because you just ate the whole bag without thinking.


Did you miss RTFA where it says it doesn't represent itself as a advertisement. A website branded with FritoLays talking up the virtues of Doritos is not the same.
 
2016-11-22 8:12:01 PM  
More than a decade ago I worked for a company that slowly morphed into an MLM when their products became commoditized.  I was tasked with writing a modeling suite to track payouts along the "pyramid", so to speak.  When I was handed the task I focused almost exclusively on the 10ft view; writing and optimizing a recursive function to track the data.  I can't tell you how important that task has been to my career.  What I learned in that job has massively impacted my professional life (and continues to).  In the end I found a way to exploit the speed of the legacy database we were using that absolutely trounced our competitor's SQL solution; the product was slick and FAAAAST.  I was very proud...

And then once it was complete, I stepped back and saw what it was used for: To dupe rubes out of their money.  Old people, immigrants and the working poor robbed blind using flashy fast software I had written.  The people that commissioned it were the shadiest of the shady, but I had handed them to the tools to do it.

When I left, no one knew how the software worked and none of the "corrections models" could be applied to keep the downlines profitable for the smug assholes at the top.  My brilliant solution was retired not 2 months later.  Good riddance.
 
2016-11-22 8:12:45 PM  

wildcardjack: That's why we outsource that sort of coding.


Easier to blame the problem on the outside that way. Smart.

That's Trump league.
 
2016-11-22 8:17:58 PM  
All I have  to say is read your EULA. We put very interesting information there (That no one reads because it is like 100 pages in 8 font).
 
2016-11-22 8:27:54 PM  

palladiate: This is why the largest companies in the world have Ethics officers, ombudsmen, and spend millions on ethics training and compliance. This might be me being a corporate apologist here, but most major orgs don't aim to be unethical, and don't tolerate it if this sort of behavior is reported up to compliance.


This isn't about being a "corporate apologist". In some fields, being unethical (and getting caught) can ruin you. A drug testing company that doesn't act ethically can find their license suspended by the FDA. That frequently ruins the company.

I worked for a drug company and they had these stories and a lot of pleading to raise things, as far as the CEO if you weren't happy, and that was about the fact that she didn't want to be poor any time soon.

Or look at VW's diesel scam. They went from 7 in 10 customers viewing VW favourably to 2 in 10.
 
2016-11-22 9:43:04 PM  

CommonName2: Even if that weren't the case, who uses an online quiz for drug advice? For any advice more serious than what Sex In The City character you are.


...why do you think the quiz was aimed at teenage girls?
 
2016-11-22 9:43:57 PM  

toraque: I dunno, everytime I try to #include <ethics.h>, Microsoft Visual Studio crashes on me.


The Roslyn Package strikes again!

/fark VS2015
 
2016-11-22 9:49:39 PM  

SkittlesAreYum: Did you miss RTFA where it says it doesn't represent itself as a advertisement. A website branded with FritoLays talking up the virtues of Doritos is not the same.


You don't get it. Any website you visit is selling you something. Whether it's a product or an idea, No one puts out anything in this world with the hopes it will be ignored.

Sure sometimes that product or idea is good, neutral, or evil. But the only reason it is on the web is someone somewhere wants other people to act or react to it - generally for their personal profit in either gratification or income.
 
2016-11-22 10:35:37 PM  

Snotnose: I've got code in the D5 nuclear missile, the Abrams tank, and the Seawolf submarine sonar system.  Had a clearance for all of em.  Nope, I don't feel the least bit guilty about it.  The job paid well, the work was interesting, my co-workers were great.


You sound more like an engineer than the code weiner in the article. As an engineer you've already given up the bit of personality needed to worry about things like morality, you just want the damned thing to work already.
 
2016-11-22 10:57:11 PM  
Ethical shmethical.  As long as it's pretty enough to get me laid.
 
2016-11-22 11:04:40 PM  

Boudyro: SkittlesAreYum: Did you miss RTFA where it says it doesn't represent itself as a advertisement. A website branded with FritoLays talking up the virtues of Doritos is not the same.

You don't get it. Any website you visit is selling you something. Whether it's a product or an idea, No one puts out anything in this world with the hopes it will be ignored.

Sure sometimes that product or idea is good, neutral, or evil. But the only reason it is on the web is someone somewhere wants other people to act or react to it - generally for their personal profit in either gratification or income.


Trust me, I get it, I just think you're wrong for equating all methods of marketing and advertising.
 
2016-11-22 11:42:01 PM  

simplicimus: palladiate: UberDave: That's not unethical.

I'm pretty sure the ethics training at my company disagrees whole-heartedly with that claim. Participating in a project that materially misrepresents itself or the company is unethical. Was this guy alone in his ethics violation?  No. was the company culture likely ok with unethical behavior? Almost certainly. Just because he wasn't alone in this doesn't absolve him.

I don't see where the coder knew of the side effects before hand. Are you arguing that a coder know all about the practices and products of the company employing him/her?


I be more concerned that they created a quiz that was passed off as a helpful service and that all the responses were rigged to return the same drug choice to get around Canadian drug advertising laws. This is the marketing department and those above them being unethical because they demanded a program that circumvents the meaning of the law with the most flimsy excuse and tried to pass it off as an independent survey, when it was clearly not.
 
2016-11-23 12:16:40 AM  
Is it me or is "ethical" not used anymore by anyone? This rant might sound a little "get off my lawn".

In the workplace I work with younger kids. Most of them would lie/cheat to get their sales numbers, especially if rewards are given to them as a result. No matter if you taught them the right way to do it, they would try and cheat their way out of it.
The younger directors staff are the same, same with "it looks good on paper" type of mentality. No matter if its bad for the business you work for, or for the industry you work for.

Recently I had to deal with a ticket, same kind of unethical behavior ( two tickets for the same infraction, one sent via mail AFTER the 1st one was paid up ). We are talking about a police officer here. I will be contesting the ticket and it will be bad for the ticketing cop, then why did he did it?

I wonder how much the Millennial mindset is affecting them? Is it because they had everything easy and now they are in the real life and "its not fair, its not as easy if I dont get to decide my failures"? "You are not teaching me the right way".

Real life is full of choices, most of them have two outcomes, one bad, one good. You can choose to take the right one every-time. When you get old you look back and you get to think about what you have done and for whom. That might screw up the way you think about yourself.

I could blame the lack of real christian education, but that wouldnt be right. There is more to this. I really wonder whats causing this.
 
2016-11-23 12:26:50 AM  

Lonestar: Real life is full of choices, most of them have two outcomes, one bad, one good.


I've been around for 63 years. My take is that there are three possible outcomes, the best, the worst and the most likely. There are always people who take shortcuts and people who stab you in the back if they see it as personally beneficial. It doesn't matter if they're Millennials, Boomers, or some alphabet generation. People are always people.
/Unless they're soylent green. That's different.
 
2016-11-23 1:11:32 AM  
"I advised her to get off the drug ASAP. Thankfully, she listened."

I think giving uneducated medical advice is more serious than coding a marketing web site.

Perhaps he should have advised his sister to consult her doctor regarding side effects.
 
2016-11-23 3:44:40 AM  
No, it barely works.
 
2016-11-23 4:08:16 AM  
I worked for a company with medical divisions, a web development provider that maintained some medical product sites, and for a marketing firm that had some drug and medical clients.  In none of the cases would any of them have ever signed off on quiz requirements that the obvious nature was misleading and so very discoverable by the public.  And I did work on a site dedicated to a known condition.  I'd say 15% said "ask your doctor about X".  75% would say "You have symptoms similar to Y, consult your physician for a more complete exam if you are concerned that this may be true."  The rest said "Your symptoms don't match condition Z but this site offers suggestion only, if you have concerns about your health, talk to your physician."  It's nice and transparent (there is some serious low level suggestion going on in how and when they use doctor vs physician, but that is a different matter) and carefully neutral.  Because their goal is not to get you saying "I need X." Their goal is to get your butt in front of your doctor so they can say "You need X."  Because they can be as sleazy with your doctor as they want for the most part.  They are like a player on the hunt only looking you get the doctor's defenses down do they can get into their prescription pad.  And while they could stall endlessly on styles, colors and layout details, those question scenarios had clearly been vetted, edited, approved, revised, re-approved, finalized and finally had all the sign offs attached before I ever saw so much as a single mock up.  They might miss some detail on something like a combo box versus a drop down, but all decision flow definitions missing????  Not a snowball's chance in hell that happened.

Tldr version: Hey look at this total real, not even a little made up story on my completely not an add for my site post....
 
2016-11-23 6:07:22 AM  

pup.socket: it barely works.


Isn`t that the new marketing phrase from Apple?
 
2016-11-23 8:30:34 AM  
The Boobiess in this thread represent about 90% of what's wrong with business ethics in this country today.  Starting with the near-godwin in the first 2 sentences - i can hardly believe that was typed non sarcastically, except i can because tons of people actually think like that.

let's go through those bullet points:
 - ethics has nothing to do with coding for the military.  it has to do with doing what is right, not deceptive, and not harmful to employers AND customers.  be they military projects or not.
- this guy is joking but a lot of people do seem to think that if ethics isn't included as part of their compiler or part of the project spec then it's not required.  that's absurd, it's everyone's responsibility.
- ethics is great until you have to get paid.  then chuck ethics in the trash, get paid, go home.  that's an amazing sentiment.  one that a lot of people seem to have.
- "dolla dolla bills, y'all" i think this is a summary of #3.
- and why is it that certain industries are accepted to have such a staggeringly low bar for ethical behavior?  in advertising practices in this case, but in other practices for other industries.
 
2016-11-23 12:56:39 PM  
Just had an argument with my boss yesterday about a programming decision, not quite as ethically an issue.

My response was, "I will not do that, its stupid", I will however gladly tell whoever wants to know, just how stupid.
 
2016-11-23 1:22:59 PM  

Lonestar: Is it me or is "ethical" not used anymore by anyone? This rant might sound a little "get off my lawn".

In the workplace I work with younger kids. Most of them would lie/cheat to get their sales numbers, especially if rewards are given to them as a result. No matter if you taught them the right way to do it, they would try and cheat their way out of it.
The younger directors staff are the same, same with "it looks good on paper" type of mentality. No matter if its bad for the business you work for, or for the industry you work for.

Recently I had to deal with a ticket, same kind of unethical behavior ( two tickets for the same infraction, one sent via mail AFTER the 1st one was paid up ). We are talking about a police officer here. I will be contesting the ticket and it will be bad for the ticketing cop, then why did he did it?

I wonder how much the Millennial mindset is affecting them? Is it because they had everything easy and now they are in the real life and "its not fair, its not as easy if I dont get to decide my failures"? "You are not teaching me the right way".

Real life is full of choices, most of them have two outcomes, one bad, one good. You can choose to take the right one every-time. When you get old you look back and you get to think about what you have done and for whom. That might screw up the way you think about yourself.

I could blame the lack of real christian education, but that wouldnt be right. There is more to this. I really wonder whats causing this.


It isn't entirely an age thing. It's more that many people go through life without ever really considering what their values are. It's hard to stick to something you haven't defined. If it's a characteristic of the young, it's simply because the kids haven't had time to develop the backbone an older person has about such things.

One of religion's contributions to civilization it is that no adult raised in a religious home can say they weren't taught a set of values. Some of those values are either ignored or run contrary to honoring all of humanity, but there is good there too.

In our modern era we really haven't replaced that religious indoctrination with anything as clearly defined. As religion has faded a strong streak of moral relativism has developed in our culture and that is not conducive to creating people who have clearly defined values.

I have a natural set of core values I followed instinctively. I've always been exceedingly honest, loyal, empathic, and had an independent streak a mile wide, but until I started defining and considering those values it was much easier to lose sight of them in the day-to-day grind of living. Thankfully I never did anything too terrible during that stretch.

I know some folks will consider it cheesy, but nowadays I hand-write my daily to do list on a legal pad - and always at the very top of the page - goes a five word mantra of "Honesty, Loyalty, Empathy, Consistency, Freedom". I do this just to give myself a daily reminder of what values I consider most core to who I am and who I want to be.

The TLDR was said best by this 'ole boy:

Aaron Tippin - You've Got To Stand For Something
Youtube Z_s-Qk07KxA
 
Displayed 48 of 48 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.