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(The Stack)   How the blockchain could kill clickbait, at zero cost   (thestack.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, blockchain reputation, blockchain-based reputation, Social network service, Reputation management, blockchain reputation vote, annual four-week online, Ether Camp forums, global internet players  
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2531 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 07 Sep 2016 at 10:59 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



39 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2016-09-07 8:27:45 AM  
1. Require a Bitcoin microtransaction to click a link.

2. Bitcoin's upper limit of seven transactions-per-second ensures that globally, only 604,800 links may be clicked per day, assuming that every block is full and there are no redundant blocks. That's right--one out of eleven humans gets to click one link per day! Er, under optimal conditions, that is. In practice, it's more like one link per twenty or thirty humans per day.

3. Watch as the click backlog quickly overwhelms the memory pool of every single Bitcoin node.

4. Nobody can click anything or send any payments for anything.

5. Clickbait (and everything else) is destroyed at zero cost. QED
 
2016-09-07 8:45:26 AM  
"Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"
 
2016-09-07 8:52:41 AM  

pkjun: 1. Require a Bitcoin microtransaction to click a link.

2. Bitcoin's upper limit of seven transactions-per-second ensures that globally, only 604,800 links may be clicked per day, assuming that every block is full and there are no redundant blocks. That's right--one out of eleven humans gets to click one link per day! Er, under optimal conditions, that is. In practice, it's more like one link per twenty or thirty humans per day.

3. Watch as the click backlog quickly overwhelms the memory pool of every single Bitcoin node.

4. Nobody can click anything or send any payments for anything.

5. Clickbait (and everything else) is destroyed at zero cost. QED



So, you think everybody has bitcoin lying around?
 
2016-09-07 8:58:55 AM  

GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"


You won't believe what happens next!
 
2016-09-07 10:48:07 AM  

nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!


We attached a clickbait to a cat's head. What happens next will astound you!
 
2016-09-07 11:02:14 AM  

bdub77: nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!

We attached a clickbait to a cat's head. What happens next will astound you!


#7 blew my mind!
 
2016-09-07 11:15:49 AM  
Guys!  I've got the bestest idea to save online journalism....upvoting!

It's an unbeatable system of only the most pure, unbiased motivation.
 
2016-09-07 11:24:38 AM  
No reporter would ever think of automating the loading of their stories to collect ad and micropayment revenue. Unpossible.
 
2016-09-07 11:28:02 AM  
I'm failing to see the brilliance OR low cost of any system that requires users to opt in to achieve the desired result when the status quo is reading sources you select yourself. I also think it'd be really difficult for investigative reporters expecting a paycheck to do their work on spec and not wind up gaming the system to get more clicks.

Engineering always makes things seem simple until the human element is introduced and mucks things up.
 
2016-09-07 11:28:28 AM  
Not to sound like the slow kid in the class, but what's a blockchain?
 
2016-09-07 11:30:37 AM  
So the big idea to to turn what remains of professional journalism into Reddit.
 
2016-09-07 11:32:09 AM  

Chariset: Not to sound like the slow kid in the class, but what's a blockchain?


The most disturbing episode of Gumby, ever.
 
2016-09-07 11:35:18 AM  
When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

"We've developed the blockchain, but so far we've only used it as a currency best know for its use in illicit trade and the apparent ease with which it can be stolen or destroyed - how can we apply blockchains to something more, well, savory?"

"I know! We can use blockchains to express the relative reputation of journalists! Sure, it's dumb - we'd have to create a central authority, decide who's a journalist, force them to use the system, and then push it as a voting mechanism worldwide on which journalists would base their entire reputations - but the best part is that we can shut down naysayers by claiming that, if you're not on board with this, you're clearly supporting clickbait and therefore have no right to say anything bad about it."

"BRILLIANT!"

Farking morons.
 
2016-09-07 11:36:48 AM  
What clickbait writers DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW.
 
2016-09-07 11:39:42 AM  
FTA: I believe that we can solve this problem by building a global decentralized unstoppable news source with reputation system for investigative journalist and payment directly to the reporter

So it'll be cat videos and whack-job sensationalist conspiracy stories that rise to the top. The invisible hand of the free market can't solve this problem.
 
2016-09-07 11:45:23 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: pkjun: 1. Require a Bitcoin microtransaction to click a link.

2. Bitcoin's upper limit of seven transactions-per-second ensures that globally, only 604,800 links may be clicked per day, assuming that every block is full and there are no redundant blocks. That's right--one out of eleven humans gets to click one link per day! Er, under optimal conditions, that is. In practice, it's more like one link per twenty or thirty humans per day.

3. Watch as the click backlog quickly overwhelms the memory pool of every single Bitcoin node.

4. Nobody can click anything or send any payments for anything.

5. Clickbait (and everything else) is destroyed at zero cost. QED


So, you think everybody has bitcoin lying around?


That's your problem with his plan?
 
2016-09-07 11:46:28 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

what clickbait really needs.
 
2016-09-07 11:49:25 AM  

Chariset: Not to sound like the slow kid in the class, but what's a blockchain?


Basically a distributed ledger.
 
2016-09-07 12:19:04 PM  

eltejon: bdub77: nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!

We attached a clickbait to a cat's head. What happens next will astound you!

#7 blew my mind!


If that blew your mind, wait until you see what Nell Carter looks like now!!
 
2016-09-07 12:20:02 PM  
Why do micropayments always cost at least a dollar?
 
2016-09-07 12:25:16 PM  

nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!


reminds me of the old matchbook covers with the guy in a lab coat holding a fistful of dollars. you just knew you were in for something good.
 
2016-09-07 12:31:15 PM  

GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"


The judges would have also accepted "one weird old trick."
 
2016-09-07 12:38:15 PM  
Internet voting! What could go wrong!
 
2016-09-07 12:48:17 PM  

SuperChuck: Benevolent Misanthrope: pkjun: 1. Require a Bitcoin microtransaction to click a link.

2. Bitcoin's upper limit of seven transactions-per-second ensures that globally, only 604,800 links may be clicked per day, assuming that every block is full and there are no redundant blocks. That's right--one out of eleven humans gets to click one link per day! Er, under optimal conditions, that is. In practice, it's more like one link per twenty or thirty humans per day.

3. Watch as the click backlog quickly overwhelms the memory pool of every single Bitcoin node.

4. Nobody can click anything or send any payments for anything.

5. Clickbait (and everything else) is destroyed at zero cost. QED


So, you think everybody has bitcoin lying around?

That's your problem with his plan?


[thatsthejoke.jpg]
 
2016-09-07 1:59:43 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2016-09-07 2:00:30 PM  

FormlessOne: When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

"We've developed the blockchain, but so far we've only used it as a currency best know for its use in illicit trade and the apparent ease with which it can be stolen or destroyed - how can we apply blockchains to something more, well, savory?"

"I know! We can use blockchains to express the relative reputation of journalists! Sure, it's dumb - we'd have to create a central authority, decide who's a journalist, force them to use the system, and then push it as a voting mechanism worldwide on which journalists would base their entire reputations - but the best part is that we can shut down naysayers by claiming that, if you're not on board with this, you're clearly supporting clickbait and therefore have no right to say anything bad about it."

"BRILLIANT!"

Farking morons.


If you're going to have to use a central authority anyway, why even bother with a blockchain?
 
2016-09-07 2:42:59 PM  
Blockchains are not a solution to anything, other than the problem of "How do I commit crimes online?"
 
2016-09-07 3:48:21 PM  
Google and Facebook are both behind it and that's a good thing?

Google is one of the primary reasons we have content farms and click-bait in the first place.
 
2016-09-07 4:10:52 PM  

secularsage: I'm failing to see the brilliance OR low cost of any system that requires users to opt in to achieve the desired result when the status quo is reading sources you select yourself. I also think it'd be really difficult for investigative reporters expecting a paycheck to do their work on spec and not wind up gaming the system to get more clicks.

Engineering always makes things seem simple until the human element is introduced and mucks things up.


This is why I advocate for the replacement of all humans with potato battery powered computers running anxiety simulations.
 
2016-09-07 4:54:38 PM  

ciderczar: [i.imgur.com image 800x1199]


I've seen that before and I can still break his weak pasty ass right in half if I'm properly caffeinated.
 
2016-09-07 5:01:05 PM  

triptheory: eltejon: bdub77: nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!

We attached a clickbait to a cat's head. What happens next will astound you!

#7 blew my mind!

If that blew your mind, wait until you see what Nell Carter looks like now!!



You won't believe how much weight she's lost!
 
2016-09-07 5:17:15 PM  

George_Spelvin: triptheory: eltejon: bdub77: nekom: GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"

You won't believe what happens next!

We attached a clickbait to a cat's head. What happens next will astound you!

#7 blew my mind!

If that blew your mind, wait until you see what Nell Carter looks like now!!


You won't believe how much weight she's lost!


Living in a box for over 25 years!
 
2016-09-07 5:34:34 PM  

GooberMcFly: "Clickbait could stopped with one simple trick.  You'll never guess what it is"


(Sponsored link on Fark)
 
2016-09-07 6:57:22 PM  
I hereby fart on this thread.
 
2016-09-07 8:41:38 PM  

2chris2: Blockchains are not a solution to anything, other than the problem of "How do I commit crimes online?"


Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.
 
2016-09-07 10:34:16 PM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: 2chris2: Blockchains are not a solution to anything, other than the problem of "How do I commit crimes online?"

Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.


How so?
 
2016-09-07 11:30:41 PM  
anfrind:
Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.

How so?


Haven't you heard of the internet of things?

It means that your toaster will communicate with your refrigerator to tell it that you are out of bread, and then your refrigerator will automatically order bread, which will be delivered to you via drone, and the refrigerator will pay for it using bitcoins.

Of course, nobody would possibly want any of this to happen, but if they did, then bitcoins would have a purpose.  (well, they still wouldn't, because bitcoins are incapable of scaling up to widespread use)
 
2016-09-08 7:16:21 AM  

anfrind: Yankees Team Gynecologist: 2chris2: Blockchains are not a solution to anything, other than the problem of "How do I commit crimes online?"

Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.

How so?


2chris2: anfrind:
Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.

How so?

Haven't you heard of the internet of things?

It means that your toaster will communicate with your refrigerator to tell it that you are out of bread, and then your refrigerator will automatically order bread, which will be delivered to you via drone, and the refrigerator will pay for it using bitcoins.

Of course, nobody would possibly want any of this to happen, but if they did, then bitcoins would have a purpose.  (well, they still wouldn't, because bitcoins are incapable of scaling up to widespread use)


Again, not currency.

You need some sort of ledger to electronically account for distinct objects with no central authority. A block chain can do that.
 
2016-09-08 11:51:05 AM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: anfrind: Yankees Team Gynecologist: 2chris2: Blockchains are not a solution to anything, other than the problem of "How do I commit crimes online?"

Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.

How so?

2chris2: anfrind:
Well...some form of it will likely be critical to Internet of Things and then programmable matter. But as currency, yeah.

How so?

Haven't you heard of the internet of things?

It means that your toaster will communicate with your refrigerator to tell it that you are out of bread, and then your refrigerator will automatically order bread, which will be delivered to you via drone, and the refrigerator will pay for it using bitcoins.

Of course, nobody would possibly want any of this to happen, but if they did, then bitcoins would have a purpose.  (well, they still wouldn't, because bitcoins are incapable of scaling up to widespread use)

Again, not currency.

You need some sort of ledger to electronically account for distinct objects with no central authority. A block chain can do that.


But if you throw out the "no central authority" requirement, it turns out that there are already dozens if not hundreds of electronic payment services that can already do that, and can do it far more efficiently than any existing blockchain-based technology.
 
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